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Full text of "Thirty-Eighth Report of the State Board of Charity of Massachusetts. 1916"

3 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/thirtyeighthrepoOOmass 



Public Document 



No. 17 



THIETY-EIGHTH ANNUAL EEPOET 



State Board of Chaeity 



MASSACHUSETTS ; 



Year ending November 30, 1916. 




tt 



BOSTON: 

WRIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

32 DERNE STREET. 

1917. 

c 

TV 



STATE LIBRARY OF MASSACHUSETTS. 
MARIO 1919 

STATE HOUSE, BOSTON 






Publication of this Document 

appeoved by the 
Supervisor op Administration. 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

Past and Present Members of the Board . . . . . . vi, vii 

Presentation of the Report ........ viii 

Part I 

General Work of the Board. 
Organization of the Report ......... 2 

Organization of the Board ......... 3 

By-laws 4 

Duties of the Board 6 

Staff Organization .......... 7 

Recommendations for Legislation 9 

New Laws affecting the Board ........ 12 

The State Institutions .......... 25 

Trustees . 26 

Numbers ........... 27 

Capacity 27 

Cost of Maintenance . . . . . . . . .29 

Movement of Population and Expenditures ..... 29 

The Institutions severally ........ 35 

The State Infirmary . . . . . . . .35 

The State Farm 40 

Norfolk State Hospital 43 

The State Training Schools 45 

Lyman School for Boys ........ 46 

Industrial School for Boys . . . . . . .49 

Industrial School for Girls ....... 52 

Massachusetts Hospital School ....... 55 

The State Tuberculosis Sanatoria ....... 58 

Rutland State Sanatorium . . . . . . .59 

North Reading State Sanatorium . . . . . .61 

Lakeville State Sanatorium ....... 63 

Weetfield State Sanatorium . . . . , '. .65 

Penikese Hospital ......... 68 

Financial Administration of Institutions . . . . . . .76 

Inventory . . '. ........ 76 

Receipts . . . . . . . . . . . 81 

* Expenditures .......... 83 

Analysis of Maintenance and Net Per Capita Cost . . . ."' . 84 

Comparison of Appropriations and Expenditures .... 96 

Appropriations for Special Purposes ...... 98 

Net Cost to the Commonwealth ....... 100 

Analysis of Pay Roll .102 



IV 



CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

The County Training Schools 109 

Supervision of the Settled Poor . . . . . . . .114 

Settled Poor in Families . . . . . . . . .115 

Dependent Minor Children in Almshouses . . . . .116 

Dependent Minor Children in Families with Settlement . . .117 

Penalty incurred by Cities and Towns for Failure to make Pauper Returns . 118 
Supervision of Mothers' Aid . . . . . . . . .119 

Supervision of Wayfarers' Lodges and Public Lodging Houses . . . 142 

Administrative Duties of the Board ....... 144 

After-care of Women and Children discharged from the State Infirmary . 150 

The State Minor Wards 161 

Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants . . . . . . . 182 

Licensed Lying-in Hospitals . . . . . . _ . . <■' . 192 

Tuition of State Minor Wards . . . " . . .195 

The Board's Finances . . . . . . . . . . 199 

Meetings of the Board . . . . . . . . . .216 



Part II 



Incorporated Private Charities. 
Investigation of Charitable Organizations seeking Incorporation 
Inspection of Charitable Corporations . . . . . 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations . 

Abstracts of Reports ........ 

Alphabetical Index ........ 



in 

v 

xi 

-366 

366 



Part III 

Almshouses and Statistics of Poor Relief by Cities and Towns. 

The City and Town Almshouses ........ iii 

Laws relating to .......... iii 

Inspection ............. iv 

Almshouses closed .......... iv 

Management .......... iv 

Construction ........... v 

Inmates ........... vi 

Consumptive Inmates ......... vii 

Defective Inmates .......... vii 

Vagrants ........... viii 

Act relative to the Lodging of Tramps and Vagrants by Cities and 

Towns viii 

Libraries of Books .......... viii 

Farm and Farm Products ........ ix 

Fire Protection ............ ix 

Recommendations made ......... ix 

Special Recommendations ........ xi 

Fall River xi 

Woburn ........... xii 

Almshouse Visitors .......•• xiii 

Reports 1-92 

Statistics of the Poor Relief , . 95 

Numbers relieved .......... • • • 95 

Cost of Poor Relief 99 



CONTENTS. 



Statistics of the Poor Relief — Concluded. page 

Table I. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by 

Cities and Towns . . . . . .101 

II. — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by 

the State 107 

III. — Movement of Poor Supported or Relieved . . 107 

IV. — Classification by Color, Nativity and Sex . . . 108 
V. — Native-born Poor Persons, Classified by Parent Na- 
tivity ........ 108 

VI. — Classification by Present Age ..... 109 
VII. — Classification by Mental Defect and Sex . . . 109 

VIII. — Classification of Discharges by Character of Discharge 

and Sex 110 

IX. — Classification of Foreign-born by Countries of Birth . 110 
X. — Percentage of Classes of Persons Relieved to Whole 

Number Relieved . . . . . .111 

XI. — Numerical Relation to Whole Population of Several 

Classes of Persons Relieved . . . . .111 

XII. — Cost to Cities and Towns of Support and Relief 112-122 

XIII. — Net Cost to State of Support and Relief in Institutions 

and in Families ....... 123 

XIV. — Total Net Cost of Public Poor Relief . . • . 123 



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State House, Boston, April 1, 1917. 
To His Excellency the Governor and the Honorable Council. 

The Thirty-eighth Annual Report of the State Board of 
Charity, covering the year from December 1, 1915, to Novem- 
ber 30, 1916, is herewith respectfully presented. 

LEOXTIXE LIXCOLX, Chairman 

CHARLES H. ADAMS, Vice-Chairman 

CHARLES R. JOHXSOX 

A. C. RATSHESKY 

JEFFREY R. BRACKETT 

THOMAS DOWNEY 

MARY A. BARR 

ROBERT M. MERRICK, M.D. 

KATHARINE H. LEONARD 



REPORT 

OF THE 

State Boaed of Chaeity 



Part I 



Geneeal Woek of the Boaed 



ORGANIZATION OF THE REPORT. 



The following report is divided for convenience into three 
parts. Part I. deals with the general work of the Board, its 
duties, both supervisory and administrative. This part is the 
main text of the report, and is published only with the full 
report. 

Part II. is devoted entirely to the Board's duties with refer- 
ence to private charitable enterprises. It is published as a 
separate pamphlet and serves as a handbook of the incorporated 
charities of the Commonwealth. It contains an introductory 
analysis of the year's investigations of petitions for the incor- 
poration of charitable enterprises, under Acts of 1910, chapter 
181; also an account of the inspection of charitable corpora- 
tions, under Acts of 1909, chapter 379. The main body of this 
part of the report is given up to abstracts of the annual returns 
made to the Board by private charitable corporations under 
the requirements of Revised Laws, chapter 84, section 14, as 
amended by Acts of 1913, chapter 82. 

Part III. contains an introductory analysis of the year's 
inspections of almshouses, together with an abstract of condi- 
tions found at each institution. At the end of this part is a 
chapter on poor relief, which contains text and tabulated anal- 
ysis of the returns of poor persons relieved, made by the re- 
spective cities and towns under the provisions of Revised Laws, 
chapter 81, section 40. Part III. is published as a separate 
pamphlet, and serves as a handbook for almshouse wardens 
and other local public relief officials. 

As provided by statute, 2,000 copies of the full report are 
printed. There are issued in addition 1,000 copies of Part II. 
and 500 copies of Part III. 

For convenience in publishing, the index to each of the three 
parts is to be found at the end of its own text instead of at 
the end of the book. 



GENEEAL WOEK OF THE BOAED. 



ORGANIZATION. 
The membership of the Board is as follows: — 

Leon tine Lincoln, Fall River, Chairman. 
Charles H. Adams, Melrose, Vice-Chair man. 
Charles R. Johnson, Worcester. 
Abraham C. Ratshesky, Boston. 
Jeffrey R. Brackett, Boston. 
Thomas Downey, Boston. 
Miss Mary A. Barr, Boston. 
Robert M. Merrick, M.D., Boston. 
Miss Katharine H. Leonard, Springfield. 

Standing Committees. 

Committee on State Adult Poor: Mr. Ratshesky, Mr. Adams, 
Mr. Johnson, Miss Barr, Dr. Merrick and the Chairman. 

Committee on State Minor Wards: Mr. Brackett, Mr. Adams, 
Mr. Downey, Miss Barr, Miss Leonard and the Chairman. 

Committee of General Visitation and Inspection: Mr. Rat- 
shesky, Miss Leonard, Dr. Merrick, Miss Barr, Mr. Johnson, 
Mr. Brackett and the Chairman. 

Committee on Inspection of Almshouses: Mr. Johnson, Dr. 
Merrick, Mr. Downey, Miss Barr and the Chairman. 

Committee on Finance: Mr. Downey, Mr. Adams, Mr. Rat- 
shesky and the Chairman. 

Committee on Social Service: Miss Barr, Mr. Adams, Miss 
Leonard, Mr. Brackett and the Chairman. 

Executive Committee: Mr. Lincoln, Mr. Adams, Mr. Ratshesky, 
Mr. Brackett, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Downey, Miss Barr. 

Executive Officers. 
Robert W. Kelso, Secretary of the Board. 
Frank W. Goodhue, Superintendent of State Adult Poor. 
James E. Fee, Superintendent of State Minor Wards. 

In addition to its executive officers the Board employs a reg- 
ular paid force of 51 men and 109 women, and receives the 
gratuitous services of 42 auxiliary visitors and 96 almshouse 
visitors, all women, and 40 parole visitors, all men. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BY-LAWS OF THE BOARD. 

1. The Board shall, at its regular meeting in June in each 
year, elect by ballot a Chairman and Vice-Chairman, who shall 
each hold office for one year, or until his successor shall have 
been chosen. Any vacancy in the office of Chairman or Vice- 
Chairman, during the year for which he may be elected, shall be 
filled by ballot. In the absence or disability of the Chairman or 
Vice-Chairman, a Chairman pro tempore may be chosen as the 
Board may determine. 

2. Regular meetings of the Board shall be held on the first 
and third Fridays of each month in the rooms of the Board at 
the State House, at two and one4ialf o'clock in the afternoon, or 
at such other place and hour as the Board may from time to 
time direct. Special meetings may be called by the Chairman, or, 
in his absence, by the Vice-Chairman, at such time and place 
as may be most convenient for the members of the Board; and 
in notifying such meetings the Secretary shall specify the sub- 
jects to be considered. Four members shall constitute a quorum 
for the transaction of business. 

3. The Committees of the Board shall be: (1) a Committee on 
State Adult Poor, to consist of five members; (2) a Committee 
on State Minor Wards, to consist of five members; (3) a Com- 
mittee of General Visitation and Inspection, to consist of six 
members; (4) a Committee on Inspection of Almshouses, to 
consist of four members; (5) a Committee on Finance, to con- 
sist of three members; (6) a Committee on Social Service, to 
consist of five members; — all to be appointed by the Chair- 
man; (7) an Executive Committee, to consist of the Chairman, 
the Vice-Chairman and the Chairmen of the Standing Commit- 
tees. The Chairman of the Board shall be, ex officio, an addi- 
tional member of each of the Standing Committees. The Com- 
mittee on State Adult Poor and the Committee on State Minor 
Wards shall severally hold meetings immediately before the 
monthly meetings of the Board, for the purpose of considering 
the reports of the Superintendents of Divisions, and preparing 
recommendations for the Board. The Committee of General 
Visitation and Inspection shall make monthly reports to the 
Board. The Committee on Inspection of Almshouses shall 
superintend and direct the visitation and inspection of city and 
town almshouses, and shall make monthly reports to the Board. 
The Committee on Finance shall have general supervision of the 
expenditures of the Board under the several annual appropria- 
tions. The Executive Committee shall act for the Board in 
the intervals between its meetings, whenever immediate action 
is demanded; such action shall be reported at the next regular 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 5 

meeting of the Board, and, if no objection is made, shall be 
regarded as the will of the Board. 

4. There shall be a Secretary of the Board, to be appointed 
by the Board. He shall be the Clerk of the Board, its auditor, 
and its disbursing officer. He shall be present at the meetings 
of the Board and of the Executive Committee, and keep a record 
of all transactions. He shall, subject to the direction of the 
Board, prepare the Annual Report and other reports and sta- 
tistics; execute all provisions of the laws relating to incorporation 
of charities; execute all provisions of the laws relating to in- 
spection and supervision, except such as are assigned to the 
Superintendents of State Adult Poor and State Minor Wards; 
and study and report to the Board on methods of public aid 
in this country and abroad. He shall make a monthly report 
to the Board of his audits and of other matters of concern to 
his office, and shall perform such other work as may be required 
of him. 

5. There shall be a Superintendent of State Adult Poor, to be 
appointed by the Board. He shall, subject to the direction of 
the Board, execute all the provisions of the laws relating to sane 
inmates of the State Infirmary and the State Farm, the sick 
State poor, those ill of dangerous diseases, and those receiving 
temporary relief; He shall also make all necessary examinations 
and investigations regarding the settlement of all sane persons 
receiving public aid. He shall make monthly visits to the 
State Infirmary and the State Farm, and quarterly visits to 
the Rutland State Sanatorium, the North Reading State San- 
atorium, the Lakeville State Sanatorium, and the Westfield 
State Sanatorium, and report upon their condition. His reports 
shall be made monthly, and he shall also annually, on or before 
December 15, furnish a summary of his work for the preceding 
fiscal year. He shall certify monthly to the Superintendents of 
the Foxborough State Hospital, the Massachusetts Hospital 
for Epileptics, and the Massachusetts School for the Feeble- 
minded, the amounts due from cities, towns and individuals for 
the support of inmates of the above-named institutions; and 
shall perform such other duties as may be required of him. 
There shall be a Deputy Superintendent, who shall be under the 
direction of the Superintendent, and who shall have charge 
of the work relating to the outdoor poor. The Superintendent 
shall also, subject to confirmation by the Board, designate one 
member of his staff as his assistant. 

6. There shall be a Superintendent of State Minor Wards, to 
be appointed by the Board. He shall, subject to the direction 
of the Board, execute all the provisions of the laws relating to 
neglected and dependent children and juvenile offenders, and 



6 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

shall provide for the placing and visitation of all such children. 
Monthly visits shall be made under his direction to the Lyman 
School for Boys, the State Industrial School for Girls, the Massa- 
chusetts Hospital School, and the Industrial School for Boys, with 
reports upon their condition. He shall have charge of all moneys 
belonging to State minor wards. His reports shall be made 
monthly, and he shall annually, on or before December 15, 
furnish a summary of his work for the preceding fiscal year, 
and shall perform such other duties as may be required of him. 
There shall be a Deputy Superintendent, who shall be under the 
direction of the Superintendent, and who shall have charge of 
the children over three years of age and of the infants. 

7. All officers, agents and other employees appointed by the 
Board shall hold office during the pleasure of the Board. 

8. These by-laws may be amended by a vote of two-thirds 
of the full Board, at any regular meeting, after previous notice 
of the change that is desired in the same by any member has 
been mailed to each member by the Secretary, three days, at 
least, before any vote shall be taken by the Board to make the 
proposed change. 

DUTIES OF THE BOARD. 

The duties of the Board may be divided into two main 
groups, namely, supervisory and administrative. As a conse- 
quence of these obligations the Board is also required to report 
and publish the results of its work, with tabulated statements 
regarding the number of poor persons relieved in the Common- 
wealth at public expense, together with the cost thereof. 
Finally, it is empowered, in like manner with other boards and 
commissions, to recommend to the Legislature such changes in 
existing laws and the enactment of such new measures as it 
deems advisable. This year, by direction of Resolves of 1916, 
chapter 46, the Board has been making a study to determine 
the expediency of State control, care and treatment of all 
juvenile offenders, and the advisability of the acquisition by the 
Commonwealth of the Rainsford Island School. 

In more specific form the supervisory duties comprise : — 
The visitation and inspection of the State Infirmary at 
Tewksbury; the State Farm at Bridgewater; the Norfolk State 
Hospital for Inebriates at Norfolk; the Lyman School for Boys 
at Westborough; the Industrial School for Boys at Shirley; 
the State Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster; the Massa- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 7 

chusetts Hospital School at Canton; the State Sanatoria at 
Rutland, North Reading, Lakeville and Westfield; the city and 
town almshouses; the county training schools; the children in 
the custody of the Lyman and Industrial Schools cared for in 
families; the children supported by cities and towns and adults 
supported in families, other than their own, by cities and 
towns; and such charitable corporations reporting to the Board 
as ask for, or consent to, such visitation and inspection; inves- 
tigation, with public hearing, and report to the Secretary of 
the Commonwealth in all cases of applications for the incor- 
poration of charitable organizations; supervision of the work 
of the cities and towns in the relief of mothers with dependent 
children under fourteen years of age; supervision of wayfarers' 
lodges and public lodging houses, as provided in chapter 606 
of the Acts of 1914. In addition, the Board has, with reference 
to the Hospital Cottages for Children at Baldwinville, the super- 
visory duty formerly carried by the State Board of Insanity. 

The administrative duties are as follows: — 

(a) The discharge of sane inmates of the State Infirmary 
and the State Farm; the execution of laws relative to the re- 
lease on parole of prisoners at the State Farm; the investiga- 
tion as to legal settlement of persons, possibly State cases, who 
have been supported, relieved or buried by cities and towns, 
and of sane inmates of State institutions; the directing of aid 
of unsettled persons by cities and towns; the transfer of sane 
paupers from one institution to another; the sending of paupers 
to the places within and without the State where they belong; 
and the administration of the leper hospital at Penikese Island. 

(6) The care and maintenance of delinquent, neglected and 
dependent children coming into the custody of the Board 
through court commitment and otherwise; and the execution 
of the laws concerning abandoned infants and infant boarding 
houses; and the licensing of lying-in hospitals. 

STAFF ORGANIZATION FOR CAERYING OUT FUNCTIONS. 

A. Supervisory Functions. 

The visitation and inspection of State institutions is made 

by committees of the Board and by the executive officers. 

Inspection of almshouses is made by an inspector working under 



8 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the direction of the committee on almshouses. In this duty 
the Board is greatly assisted by its corps of unpaid friendly 
visitors of whom there were 95 last year. The supervision of 
local relief to mothers with dependent children is carried out 
by a supervisor and corps of visitors attached to the Division 
of State Adult Poor. The county training schools are visited 
and reported upon by the secretary, while supervision of local 
child placing is done by the regular staff of visitors. The 
secretary is responsible to the Board for all matters of super- 
vision relating to private charitable enterprises, under Revised 
Laws, chapter 84, Acts of 1909, chapter 379, and Acts of 1910, 
chapter 181. This branch of the Board's activities, in par- 
ticular that which relates to private charities and the inspec- 
tion of institution plant and finances, is reviewed by the com- 
mittee of general visitation and inspection. For report of the 
year's work under this group see Part I., pages 25-108, and 
the whole of Parts II. and III. 

B. Administrative Functions. 

The administrative functions of the Board are carried out 
through two main divisions, namely, the Division of State 
Adult Poor and the Division of State Minor Wards. To the 
Division of State Minor Wards falls all duties relating to the 
care and maintenance of minors in the Board's custody, and 
the ancillary duties of licensing and inspection of infant board- 
ing houses and lying-in hospitals. The work of this division 
is reviewed by the committee on State Minor Wards. An 
account of the year's results will be found on pages 161-198 of 
Part I. 

All other administrative functions are executed through the 
Division of State Adult Poor, the work of its superintendent 
and staff being reviewed by the committees on State Adult 
Poor and Social Service. The results are reported on pages 
114-161 of Part I. 

All standing committees, except the committee on finance 
and the executive committee, meet at regular intervals. The 
full Board meets regularly on the first and third Fridays of 
each month. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 9 

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LEGISLATION. 

The following are the recommendations of the Board for 
legislative action, all of which have been forwarded to the 
Secretary of the Commonwealth as required by Acts of 1910, 
chapter 452 : — 

1. Further Extension of the State's Facilities for In- 

stitutional Care of Feeble-minded Persons. 
The critical need of further protection of the community 
against the effects of feeble-mindedness by cutting off this 
prolific source of public dependency has been recognized by the 
Legislatures of 1915 and 1916 in the appropriation of funds with 
which to purchase a site and construct the first unit of an 
institution plant. A substantial appropriation should be added 
this year and the institution recognized as a thing in being. 
To this end the State Board of Charity renews its recommenda- 
tion of 1914, 1915 and 1916, that a board of trustees be created 
to administer the new school for the feeble-minded at Belcher- 
town, under the general supervision of the Commission on 
Mental Diseases. No bill accompanies this recommendation. 

2. Establishment of a Hospital for the Care and Treat- 

ment of Sick State Minor Wards. 

The need of provision for hospital care for sick State minor 
wards long ago reached an acute stage. It is manifest in the 
annual requests of the trustees of the State Infirmary for 
buildings in which to house State wards, and in the recom- 
mendations of the State Board of Charity for a hospital for sick 
State children. 

The recommendation for such a hospital, to be located at 
some place other than Tewksbury, has been made by the 
Board in 1914, 1915 and 1916. The Board has constantly in 
its care hundreds of children, each one of whom is for days, 
weeks or perhaps months in need of hospital treatment. Such 
children are for the time being incapable of placement in 
homes. They require treatment in some institution until their 
health is such that th,ey may be sent out into the community. 
With a total of 6,031 children in the Board's care, this margin 



10 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

of cases requiring hospital treatment is constant, and may be 
expected to increase each year in exact proportion to the 
normal increase in the total number of wards. 

The Board has no hospital in which to treat these children. 
Some, falling sick in their foster homes, are cared for by private 
hospitals at State expense. Most are sent to the State In- 
firmary, the only public institution to which the Board can send 
them. Here they are out of place and greatly hamper the In- 
firmary in its more legitimate activities. Thus located, they are 
an ever-increasing danger to themselves. At the same time, 
they lose the benefit of special care and treatment so frequently 
demanded by the miserable condition in which they are found 
by the authorities and in which they remain at the time of 
commitment to the Board's custody. A bill accompanies this 
recommendation. 

3. Creation of a Separate Board of Trustees to Ad- 
minister Penikese Hospital, retaining only the 
Supervision in the State Board of Charity. 
As represented in former years, though the State Board of 
Charity has always believed that lepers should be cared for on 
the mainland where nearness of friends and relatives would 
soften the sadness of exile, and where the outlay of public 
money would be much less, while the danger to the community 
would be no greater, it has nevertheless maintained and de- 
veloped the hospital located on the island of Penikese in re- 
sponse to the absolute demand of the public that persons suf- 
fering with this disease shall be isolated in some place remote 
from the daily life of the people; and this work will be cheer- 
fully continued, should the Legislature consider that the wiser 
course. This recommendation of a separate administrative 
board is made in the belief that it is now possible to secure the 
services of specialists in this disease upon such a hospital 
board, and in the further belief that the administration of State 
institutions and their supervision should in all cases be placed 
in separate bodies, and that the duties of a board primarily 
supervisory in nature should not be complicated by admin- 
istrative duties, where necessity or considerations of public 
expediency do not appear. A bill is submitted. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 11 

4. Provision at Norfolk State Hospital for the Recep- 

tion and Care of Female Inebriates. 
Chapter 73 of the General Acts of 1915 authorized the com- 
mitment of female inebriates to Norfolk State Hospital. The 
Legislature has thus recognized at once the needs for these 
unfortunates of some provision more humane than confinement 
among the criminal and the insane, and the injustice of a dis- 
crimination between the sexes in the discharge of the State's 
obligation. But though the statutes now authorize commit- 
ment to Norfolk State Hospital, no provision has thus far 
been granted for their reception. The trustees this year ask 
for a reception ward and a dormitory cottage, these to represent 
a first unit of the women's colony. The State Board of Charity 
approves the recommendation and urges its adoption. No bill 
is submitted by this Board. 

5. Amendment of Chapter 181 of the Acts of the Year 
1910, rendering the approval of the state board 
of Charity requisite to the Incorporation of Pri- 
vate Charities, and providing that All Changes 
of Name or of Purpose shall be investigated in 
Like Manner with Petitions for Incorporation. 

Under the existing statute the Board is required to investi- 
gate all petitions for the incorporation of private charities, 
to give public hearings and to report its findings to the Secre- 
tary of the Commonwealth. The operation of this law, in 
connection with chapter 402 of the Acts of the year 1903, 
requiring annual reporting by all charities, and chapter 379 
of the Acts of the year 1909, providing annual inspection 
of incorporated charitable agencies, is demonstrating beyond 
•all question the wisdom of State supervision of incorporated 
charitable agencies. Though this policy is of recent date, the 
incorporated charities of the entire Commonwealth have come 
to look upon State supervision as a help in the development 
of right standards of relief. Bearing in mind the public trus- 
teeship involved in every private charity, the Board believes 
that the time has come when its special knowledge in the field 
of private charities should be brought to bear upon all new 



12 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

petitions for the incorporation of charities by rendering its 
approval requisite to the issuance of a charter. The recom- 
mendation is repeated from former years. A bill is submitted. 

6. Amendment to Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1913 to pro- 
vide an Increase from $7 per Week to $10.50 per 
Week in the Rate of Reimbursement allowed by the 
Commonwealth to Cities and Towns for Sick Aid in 
Local Hospitals. 
Under the provisions of section 15 of chapter 85 of the 
Revised Laws, the Commonwealth has for many years allowed 
reimbursement to cities and towns for aid rendered to sick 
persons in local hospitals where such persons were found with- 
out settlement. Formerly the amount of such reimbursement 
was fixed at a maximum of $5 per week, this rate appearing 
at that time to approximate the average amount expended by 
cities and towns for such aid. In 1913 this maximum was in- 
creased to $7, though it appeared that the average amount 
paid by the cities and towns for such aid was probably in excess 
of that amount. 

This Board believes the intent of the law to be the reim- 
bursement of the average reasonable amount paid. It is also 
satisfied that the average reasonable amount paid is at the 
present time not less than $10.50 per week. It therefore rec- 
ommends that that amount be fixed as the maximum limit of 
reimbursement. A bill is submitted. 



LAWS AFFECTING THE BOARD, PASSED BY THE LEGISLA- 
TURE OF 1916. 

General Acts of 1916. 

Chapter 55. 

An Act requiring local boards of health to notify the 
state department of health of cases of dangerous 
diseases. 
Section 1. Section fifty-two of chapter seventy-five of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by section one of chapter four hun- 
dred and eighty of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
seven, is hereby further amended by striking out the words 
"smallpox, diphtheria, scarlet fever or of any other", in the 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 13 

third line, and inserting in place thereof the word : — any, — 
by striking out the word "board", in the fourth and sixth lines, 
and inserting in place thereof the word: — department, — and 
also by striking out the words "the secretary thereof shall forth- 
with transmit a copy of such notice to the state board of char- 
ity", in the eighth and ninth lines, and inserting in place thereof 
the words : — upon request the state department of health shall 
forthwith certify any such reports to the state board of charity, 
— so as to read as follows : — Section 52. If the board of health 
of a city or town has had notice of a case of any disease declared 
by the state department of health to be dangerous to the public 
health therein, it shall within twenty-four hours thereafter give 
notice thereof to the state department of health stating the name 
and the location of the patient so afflicted, and upon request the 
state department of health shall forthwith certify any such reports 
to the state board of charity. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved March 21, 1916. 

Chapter 66. 

An Act relative to the employment of certain minors in 
the summer season. 
The second paragraph of section seventeen of chapter seven 
hundred and seventy-nine of the acts of the year nineteen hun- 
dred and thirteen is hereby amended by adding at the end there- 
of the following: — provided, however, that children who are over 
fourteen but under sixteen years of age and who do not possess 
such ability to read, write and spell in the English language as 
is required for the completion of the fourth grade of the public 
schools of the city or town in which they reside, may be granted 
an employment certificate good for the summer vacation, subject 
to all other provisions relating to the employment of children 
between fourteen and sixteen years of age, — so that said second 
paragraph will read as follows : — No such school record shall be 
issued or accepted and no employment certificate shall be granted 
unless the child possesses the educational qualifications enumer- 
ated in section one of chapter forty-four of the Revised Laws as 
amended by section one of this act: provided, however, that chil- 
dren who are over fourteen but under sixteen years of age and 
who do not possess such ability to read, write and spell in the 
English language as is required for the completion of the fourth 
grade of the public schools of the city or town in which they 
reside may be granted an employment certificate good for the 
summer vacation, subject to all other provisions relating to the 
employment of children between fourteen and sixteen years of 
age. [Approved March 22, 1916. 



U STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1! 



Chapter 160. 

An Act to provide for exchange of information between 
the state board of charity and overseers of the poor 
and the massachusetts commission for the blind, a xd 
to provide for aiding persons with seriously defective 
eyesight. 

Section 1. Section two of chapter three hundred and eighty- 
five of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and six is hereby 
amended by inserting at the end thereof the words : — The state 
board of charity and the overseers of the poor of cities and towns 
are hereby directed to aid the commission by reporting whenever 
outdoor or indoor aid is granted to families in which there is a 
blind member or members, and the commission is hereby directed 
to report in turn to the state board of charity and the overseers 
of the poor of cities and towns any activity on their part in 
relation to blind persons who or whose families are known to be 
receiving or to have received public outdoor or indoor aid, — 
so as to read as follows : — Section 2. The commission shall be 
authorized to prepare and maintain a register of the blind in 
Massachusetts, which shall describe their condition, cause of 
blindness and capacity for education and industrial training. 
The chief of the bureau of statistics of labor is hereby directed 
to aid the commission by furnishing it from time to time, upon 
its request, with the names, addresses and such other facts con- 
cerning the blind as may be recorded by the enumerators in 
taking any decennial census. The state board of charity and 
the overseers of the poor of cities and towns are hereby directed 
to aid the commission by reporting whenever outdoor or indoor 
aid is granted to families in which there is a blind member or 
members, and the commission is hereby directed to report in 
turn to the state board of charity and the overseers of the poor 
of cities and towns any activity on their part in relation to blind 
persons who or whose families are known to be receiving or to 
have received public outdoor or indoor aid. 

Section 2. Said chapter three hundred and eighty-five is 
hereby further amended by inserting a new section after section 
two to be numbered 2 A, as follows: — Section 2 A. The com- 
mission is further authorized to register cases of persons whose 
eyesight is seriously defective or who are liable to become visu- 
ally handicapped or blind, and to take such measures, in co- 
operation with other authorities, as it may deem advisable for 
the prevention of blindness or conservation of eyesight, and, 
in appropriate cases, for the education of children and for the 
vocational guidance of adults having seriously defective sight. 
[Approved April 27, 1916. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 15 

Chapter 188. 

An Act to authorize the granting of temporary licenses 
to sell certain articles for charitable purposes. 

Section 1. The overseers of the poor in any city and the 
board of selectmen in any town may under such conditions as 
they may deem proper, grant to any organization engaged ex- 
clusively in charitable work a special license authorizing it upon 
a particular day and for a charitable purpose named in such 
license, to sell through its accredited agents in the streets and 
other public places within such city or town, or in any designated 
part thereof, flags, badges, medals, buttons, flowers, souvenirs 
and similar small articles: provided, that no person under sixteen 
years of age shall be accredited as such agent, that each agent 
shall wear in plain sight while engaged in selling such articles a 
badge, provided by such organization and approved by the 
authority issuing the license, bearing upon it the name of such 
organization and the date on which the license is to be exercised, 
and that no such agent shall be authorized to make or attempt 
to make such sales in front of any private premises against the 
objection of the owner or occupant thereof. The exercise of the 
licenses hereby provided for shall be subject to the provisions of 
all statutes, ordinances, by-laws, rules and regulations not incon- 
sistent herewith. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 10, 1916. 

Chapter 197. 

An Act to promote the building and use of tuberculosis 
hospitals in cities and towns. 

Section 1. Chapter five hundred and ninety-seven of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and eleven, as amended in 
section one by section one of chapter six hundred and thirty- 
seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and twelve and 
by chapter fifty-seven of the General Acts of the year nineteen 
hundred and sixteen, is hereby further amended by striking out 
said section one and inserting in place thereof the following : — 
Section 1. Every city or town which places its patients suffering 
from tuberculosis in a municipal or incorporated tuberculosis 
hospital in this commonwealth, or in a building or ward set 
apart for patients suffering from tuberculosis by a municipal or 
incorporated hospital in this commonwealth, shall be entitled to 
receive from the commonwealth a subsidy of five dollars a week 
for each patient who is unable to pay for his support, or whose 
kindred bound by law to maintain him are unable to pay for the 



16 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

same; but a city or town shall not become entitled to this sub- 
sidy unless, upon examination authorized by the trustees of hos- 
pitals for consumptives, the sputum of such patient be found 
to contain bacilli of tuberculosis, nor unless the hospital building 
or ward be approved by said trustees, who shall not give such 
approval unless they have by authority of law, or by permission 
of the hospital, full authority to inspect the same at all times. 
Said trustees may at any time withdraw their approval. In the 
case of those hospitals having a bed capacity which, in the 
judgment of the said trustees, is in excess of the number of beds 
needed for patients exhibiting tubercle bacilli in their sputum, 
in the localities which these institutions serve, the subsidy above 
provided for shall be allowed for such patients not exhibiting 
tubercle bacilli in their sputum as, in the joint opinion of the 
superintendent of the institution and of the state district health 
officer of the district in which the hospital is situated, are bona 
fide cases of consumption and have been in the institution more 
than thirty days. Said trustees shall not approve claims for 
subsidy hereunder for more than thirty days prior to the date 
when notice is mailed to them that a subsidy in any given case 
is claimed. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 11, 1916. 

Chapter 243. 

An Act relative to delinquent children. 

Section 1. Section five of chapter four hundred and thirteen 
of the acts of the year nineteen- hundred and six is hereby 
amended by inserting after the word "cases", in the eighth 
line, the words : — except that the trial of the said appeals in 
the superior court shall not be in conjunction with the other 
business of that court, but shall be held in a session set apart 
and devoted for the time being exclusively to the trial of juvenile 
cases. This shall be known as the juvenile session of the superior 
court, and shall have a separate trial list and docket. All juvenile 
appeal cases in the superior court shall be transferred to this list, 
and shall be tried, unless otherwise disposed of by direct order 
of the court. In any appeal case the superior court before pass- 
ing sentence or before ordering other disposition shall be supplied 
with a report of any investigation thereon made by the proba- 
tion officer of the court from which the appeal was taken, — 
so as to read as follows: — Section 5. Hearings upon cases aris- 
ing under this act may be adjourned from time to time. A 
child that has been adjudged by the court a wayward or de- 
linquent child may appeal to the superior court, and such child 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 17 

shall, at the time of such adjudication, be notified of its right 
to appeal. The appeal, if taken, shall be entered, tried and 
determined in like manner as appeals from trial justices in 
criminal cases, except that the trial of the said appeals in the 
superior court shall not be in conjunction with the other business 
of that court, but shall be held in a session set apart and devoted 
for the time being exclusively to the trial of juvenile cases. This 
shall be known as the juvenile session of the superior court, and 
shall have a separate trial list and docket. All juvenile appeal 
cases in the superior court shall be transferred to this list, and 
shall be tried, unless otherwise disposed of by direct order of the 
court. In any appeal case the superior court before passing sen- 
tence or before ordering other disposition shall be supplied with 
a report of any investigation thereon made by the probation 
officer of the court from which the appeal was taken. The 
provisions of section thirty-four of chapter two hundred and 
seventeen, and of section twenty-two of chapter two hundred and 
nineteen of the Revised Laws, relative to recognizances in cases 
continued or appealed, shall be applicable in cases arising under 
this act. 

A child under fourteen years of age, who has been held for 
examination or trial, or to prosecute an appeal to the superior 
court, if unable to furnish bail, shall be committed to the care 
of the state board of charity or of a probation officer. The 
person to whose care it is so committed shall provide for its safe 
keeping and for its appearance at its examination or trial, or at 
the prosecution of its appeal. 

A child fourteen or more years of age, so held, if unable to 
furnish bail shall be so committed to a probation officer, unless 
the court, upon immediate inquiry, shall be of opinion that, if 
so committed, such child will not appear at such examination 
or trial, in which case said child may be committed to jail. 

Said probation officer shall have all the authority, rights and 
powers, in relation to a child committed to his care under this 
section, and in relation to a child released to him, as provided 
in section three, which he would have if he were surety upon 
the recognizance of such a child. 

Section 2. Section six of said chapter four hundred and 
thirteen is hereby amended by striking out all after the word 
"kept", in the fifth line, down to and including the word "trials'', 
in the seventh line, and inserting in place thereof the following: 
— Said session shall be separate from that for the trial of crim- 
inal cases, shall not be held in conjunction with other business 
of the court, and shall be held in rooms not used for criminal 
trials; and in places where no separate juvenile court room is 
provided the hearings, so far as possible, shall be held in cham- 



18 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

bers, — and by adding at the end of the section, the words: — 
and the court shall have power to exclude the general public 
from the room, admitting only such persons as may have a 
direct interest in the case, — so as to read as follows : — Sec- 
tion 6. Courts shall designate suitable times for the hearing of 
cases of juvenile offenders, and wayward or delinquent children, 
which shall be called the session for children, for which a separate 
docket and record shall be kept. Said session shall be separate 
from that for the trial of criminal cases, shall not be held in 
conjunction with other business of the court, and shall be held 
in rooms not used for criminal trials; and in places where no 
separate juvenile court room is provided the hearings, so far as 
possible, shall be held in chambers. No minor shall be allowed 
to be present at any such hearing unless his presence is neces- 
sary, either as a party or as a witness; or, in the opinion of the 
court, in the interests of justice; and the court shall have power 
to exclude the general public from the room, admitting only such 
persons as may have a direct interest in the case. 

Section 3. Section eight of said chapter four hundred and 
thirteen is hereby amended by inserting after the word "girls", 
in line twenty-four, the following : — until discharged by the 
trustees of the school, but not for a longer period than, — and 
also by inserting after the word "years", in the twenty-fifth 
line, the words: — but nothing in this act shall affect or abridge 
the powers of said trustees to parole, — so as to read as follows: — 
Section 8. At the hearing of a complaint against a child the 
court shall examine such child, and any witnesses that appear, 
and take such testimony relative to the case as shall be produced. 
If the allegations against a child are proved, it may be adjudged 
a wayward or delinquent child, as the case may be. 

If a child is adjudged a wayward child, the court may place 
it in the care of a probation officer for such time and upon such 
conditions as may seem proper, or may deal with it in the man- 
ner provided bv law for the disposal of the case of a neglected 
child. 

If a child is adjudged a delinquent child, the court may place 
the case on file, or may place the child in the care of a probation 
officer for such time and on such conditions as may seem proper. 
If it is alleged in the complaint upon which the child is so ad- 
judged, that a law of the commonwealth has been violated, the 
court may, with the consent of the state board of charity, author- 
ize said board to take and indenture such child, or place it in 
charge of any person, and if at any time thereafter such child 
proves unmanageable, to commit such child, if a boy under 
fifteen years of age, to the Lyman school for boys, or if a girl 
under seventeen years of age, to the state industrial school for 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 19 

girls, until discharged by the trustees of the school, but not for 
a longer period than until such child attains the age of twenty- 
one years; but nothing in this act shall affect or abridge the 
powers of said trustees to parole. Said board may provide for 
the maintenance, in whole or in part, of any child so indentured 
or placed in charge of any person. 

The court shall also have power to commit such delinquent 
child to any institution to which it might be committed upon a 
conviction for such violation of law, excepting a jail or house of 
correction, and all laws applicable to a boy or girl committed 
upon such a conviction shall apply to a delinquent child com- 
mitted under this section. 

Section 4. Said chapter four hundred and thirteen is hereby 
further amended by striking out section thirteen and inserting 
in place thereof the following: — Section 13. Any parent or 
guardian or person having the custody or control of a wayward 
or delinquent child, as defined by this act, who shall be found 
to have knowingly or wilfully encouraged, aided, caused or 
abetted, or connived at, or has knowingly or wilfully done any 
act or acts to produce, promote or contribute to the delinquency 
or waywardness of such child shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and may be punished by a fine of not more than fifty dollars or 
by imprisonment for not more than six months. The court, 
however, may release on probation under the provisions of sec- 
tion eighty-four of chapter two hundred and seventeen of the 
Revised Laws, as amended by chapter eight of the acts of the 
year nineteen hundred and eleven, subject to such orders as it 
may make as to future conduct tending to produce or contribute 
to such delinquency or waywardness, or it may suspend sentence 
under the provisions of section one of chapter two hundred and 
twenty of the Revised Laws, as amended by chapter six hundred 
and fifty-three of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
thirteen, or before trial, with the defendant's consent, it may 
allow the defendant to enter into a recognizance, in such penal 
sum as the court may fix, conditioned to comply with such terms 
as the court may order for the promotion of the future welfare 
of the child, and the said case may then be placed on file. The 
provisions for appeal and recognizance stated in section five of 
this act shall be applicable to cases arising under this section. 
The Boston juvenile court shall have jurisdiction, concurrent 
with the municipal court of the city of Boston, of complaints 
under this section. 

Section 5. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved May 22, 1916. 



20 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Chapteh 286. 

Ax Act to provide foe the construction by counties of 

TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITALS FOR CITIES AND TOWNS HAVING 
LESS THAN FIFTY THOUSAND INHABITANTS. 

Section 1. The county commissioners of each county in the 
commonwealth, except Suffolk, Xantucket and Dukes County, 
are hereby authorized and directed to provide adequate hospital 
care for all those persons residing in cities or towns having less 
than fifty thousand population, as determined by the latest 
United States census, within the boundaries of their respective 
counties and suffering from consumption, who are in need of such 
hospital care and for whom adequate hospital provision does not 
already exist. The said hospital provision shall be available for 
patients on or before the first day of January, nineteen hundred 
and eighteen; but if, in order to comply with the provisions of 
this section, it is necessary for any county to construct a new 
building at an expense exceeding ten thousand dollars, including 
any necessary payment for land, or to make substantial additions 
to or alterations in an existing building at an expense exceeding 
ten thousand dollars, such new construction, addition or altera- 
tion need not be completed until the first day of September, 
nineteen hundred and eighteen. 

Section 2. A contract entered into before January first of 
the year nineteen hundred and seventeen for a term of years not 
less than five nor more than twenty-five, and approved by the 
state department of health after a petition made to the said 
department and a public hearing thereon, between (a) boards 
of county commissioners of two adjoining counties, or (b) boards 
of county commissioners of any county and the legally consti- 
tuted authorities of any city within the same county, or (c) 
either county commissioners or the legally constituted authorities 
of cities of fifty thousand or more inhabitants and the trustees 
or authorities of any existing or future privately endowed tuber- 
culosis institution, or the trustees of any fund available for the 
purpose of supplying hospital facilities for persons suffering from 
consumption, for the express purpose of supplying, within a 
reasonable time as provided in the conditions of approval of the 
state department of health, and guaranteeing adequate hospital 
provision for consumptives coming under the provisions of this 
act, shall be held to be satisfactory compliance with the pro- 
visions of this act for such counties, sections of counties, or for 
such cities or classes of individuals, as the case may be, as are 
designated in the contract; and such contracts shall, subject to 
the approval of the state department of health, be renewable 
upon such terms as shall be satisfactory to the contracting 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 21 

parties: provided, however, that if such contracts are not renewed 
and approved by the state department of health at least nine 
months before their expiration, or if the contracts are renewed 
and the state department of health shall refuse approval on the 
ground that by reason of changed circumstances the contract 
will be inadequate properly to protect the public health of the 
communities affected by it, and the contracting parties fail within 
six months before the time when the previous contract expires to 
agree to a renewal of the contract upon terms approved by the 
state department of health,- the duties and obligations relative 
to supplying adequate hospital care for such counties, or sections 
of counties, cities or classes of individuals imposed upon county 
commissioners and city governments by this act shall be in full 
force and effect. 

Section 3. "Adequate" hospital provision for consumptives 
within the meaning of this act shall be held to mean at least 
one such hospital bed for each two deaths from consumption in 
the county, counties, parts of a county, or cities served by such 
hospitals, as the case may be, as determined by computing the 
average number of deaths from consumption per annum for the 
years nineteen hundred and eleven to nineteen hundred and 
fifteen, inclusive, in the communities served by such hospitals, 
and by a similar quinquennial computation by the state depart- 
ment of health thereafter. 

Section 4. Cities having more than fifty thousand inhabit- 
ants within the meaning of this act, and also cities and towns 
having less than fifty thousand inhabitants within the meaning 
of this act but already possessing and continuing to furnish 
adequate tuberculosis hospital provision according to section 
three, shall be exempt from the provisions of this act and shall 
not be required to pay any part of the county tax which is 
assessed in order to comply with the provisions of this act. 

Section 5. County commissioners are authorized and directed, 
subject to the approval of the state department of health, to 
erect one or more hospitals within their respective counties to 
carry out the provisions of this act, or they may in the case of 
counties having a total population of less than fifty thousand 
inhabitants, as determined by the latest United States census, 
arrange to obtain tuberculosis hospital care for those consumptives 
coming within their jurisdiction by entering into a contract with 
a tuberculosis institution in a neighboring county in accordance 
with the provisions of section two. No new tuberculosis hospital 
shall be erected under the provisions of this act having a total 
capacity of less than fifty beds. 

Section 6. County commissioners are authorized and directed 
in carrying out the provisions of this act, to raise and expend 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. T. D. 17. 

such sums of money for acquiring land and constructing and 
equipping hospitals, and for the purchase, alteration and en- 
!::rment of existing buildings, as may be necessary to carry 
out the provisions of this act. They are authorized to borrow 
on the credit of the county the said sums of money, and to issue 
the notes of the county therefor, with interest at a rate not ex- 
ceeding five per cent per annum, payable semi-annually. The 
notes shall be signed by the county treasurer and countersigned 
by a majority of the county commissioners. The county may 
sell the said securities at public or private sale on such terms or 
conditions as may be deemed proper, but the proceeds shall be 
used only for the purposes specified by this act. Said notes may 
be renewed from time to time until such time as all the cities 
and towns liable have paid to the county treasurer the amounts 
assessed. All reimbursement from cities and towns shall be 
applied to the payment of temporary debt incurred under the 
provisions of this act by said counties 

Sbctic h 7. When the hospital is completed and equipped, the 
county commissioners shall determine the cost of the same, to- 
gether with the interest paid or due on the bonds or notes issued 
therefor, and shall apportion the same to the several cities and 
towns that are liable under this act, in accordance with their 
valuation used in assessing the county taxes. And each of the 
cities and towns liable under this act to contribute to the con- 
struction and equipment of said hospital, shall pay its proportion 
:: ^:d expenses into the treasury of the county in such manner 
and in such instalments as the county commissioners shall, by a 
special order direct; and if any city or town shall neglect or re- 
fuse to pay its proportion as required by said order, the county 
commissioners shall, after notice to the city or town, and unless 
sufficient cause is shown to the contra:;. i^ue a warrant against 
the city or town for the sum which it was ordered to pay, with 
interest, and the costs ;f the notice and warrant; and the same 
shall be collected and paid into the county treasury, to be applied 
in payment of the expenses aforesaid. 

Sectiob 8. Any city or town upon which any part of the 
expense \: .instruction of said hospital shall have been 
or apportioned by the county commissioners may incur indebted- 
and may issue bonds or other securities for the payment 
of their respective assessments, outside of their statutory debt 
limit. Such bonds or other securities shall be issued upon the 
serial plan, in accordance with the provisions of chapter seven 
hundred and nineteen of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and thhz- a fai as they apply, and shall be payable ithin 
aftei then respective dates of issue. 

Skctioh r The county shall provide for the care, mainte- 
nance and repair of said hospital. In Janua : ra.cn year the 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 23 

county commissioners shall apportion the cost of the same for 
the previous year to the cities and towns liable under this act, 
in the same proportion in which the cost of the construction was 
assessed, and shall issue their warrant against the cities and 
towns for the amount or percentage for which the cities and 
towns are severally assessed to pay for the maintenance, care and 
repair of said hospital. The county may, thirty days after a 
demand in writing for payment, recover in an action of contract 
against any city or town liable to pay any part of the cost of 
construction, maintenance or repair of said hospital, the amount 
for which the same may be liable. 

Section 10. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of 
this act county commissioners may purchase or lease, or take by 
right of eminent domain, such land, not exceeding five hundred 
acres in extent, as they may deem necessary or convenient. 
Damages for the taking of land or for the doing of any other act 
under authority hereof may be recovered in the manner provided 
by law for the recovery of damages in the case of land taken for 
highways. If land is taken by right of eminent domain, the 
county commissioners shall file in the registry of deeds for the 
district where the land is situated, a plan and description of the 
land taken sufficiently accurate for identification, whereupon title 
to the land shall vest in the county, to be held for said hospital 
district. 

Section 11. The county commissioners shall be trustees of 
the hospitals erected under the provisions of this act, shall make 
suitable regulations for their government, and shall appoint 
superintendents and such other officers and employees as may 
be necessary for the proper conduct of such hospitals. The 
superintendents and other physicians employed shall be appointed 
subject to the approval of the trustees of hospitals for con- 
sumptives. 

Section 12. Patients shall be admitted to the said hospitals 
through application by the boards or departments of health of 
the cities and towns served by the hospitals. The charges for 
the support of patients shall be based on the actual cost of their 
care and treatment, exclusive of all interest or other expenses 
pertaining to the construction, equipment or permanent upkeep 
of the institution, which expenses shall be a charge against the 
county, as provided in section six. Patients may be admitted 
who pay for their care in whole or in part, on terms fixed by the 
trustees, or for whom such payment in whole or in part is made 
by others; but all patients shall be admitted in the order of their 
application, and no preference shall be given to paying patients 
over others. The charge for the support of the patient in any 
hospital established hereunder shall be paid by the city or town 
by which he is sent to the hospital, so far as the same or any 



24 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

part thereof is not paid by the patient, or in his behalf, as afore- 
said. If the patient has no known settlement in the common- 
wealth the charge shall be paid by the commonwealth upon the 
approval of the bills by the state board of charity in the same 
manner as provided by chapter three hundred and eighty of the 
acts of the year nineteen hundred and nine. Such charges may 
afterward be recovered by the city or town or by the treasurer 
of the commonwealth, as the case may be, from the patient if 
he is able to pay, or from any person or kindred bound by law 
to maintain him, in the manner now provided by section ten of 
chapter four hundred and seventy-four of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and seven, as amended by chapter seventeen 
of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and twelve, for the re- 
covery of unpaid charges for the support of inmates of the state 
sanatoria. All cities and towns paying for the support of patients, 
an amount exceeding fifty per cent of the actual cost of main- 
taining them in hospitals erected, or utilized by contract, under 
the provisions of this act shall be entitled to any payment or 
repayments allowed under the laws of the commonwealth in the 
same manner and subject to the same conditions which now ap- 
ply to the support of tuberculosis patients in a city or town 
tuberculosis hospital. 

Section 13. The situation, plans for construction and actual 
construction of any new hospitals or additions to any existing 
hospitals, provided for the purpose of carrying out the provisions 
of this act, shall be subject to the approval of the state depart- 
ment of health. The state department of health, for each hos- 
pital maintained by counties under the provisions of this act, 
and for each hospital caring under contract with county com- 
missioners for tuberculosis patients, shall annually in January 
appoint from the inhabitants of the cities or towns served by the 
aforesaid hospitals an unpaid board of five official visitors, of 
whom two shall be women, whose duty it shall be to visit the 
said hospitals from time to time and to make such suggestions 
and recommendations relative to the improvement of their man- 
agement, and to the efficient and humane care of patients, as 
they may deem proper, jointly to the county commissioners and 
the state district health officer within whose jurisdiction the 
institution is situated. 

Section 14. The mayors of the cities of Chelsea and Revere 
and the chairman of the board of selectmen of the town of Win- 
throp shall have and exercise, for the purposes of this act, the 
powers given to county commissioners, and they are hereby 
designated as a board of trustees for the tuberculosis hospital 
district comprising the cities of Chelsea and Revere and the town 
of Winthrop, and they are hereby authorized and directed to 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 25 

provide adequate hospital care for persons residing in the cities 
of Chelsea and Revere and the town of Winthrop suffering from 
consumption who are in need of such hospital care in the same 
manner as county commissioners are directed in section one. 

Section 15. Nothing in this act shall be construed to repeal 
chapter five hundred and twenty-seven of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and thirteen, or chapter one hundred and 
fifty-three of the General Acts of the year nineteen hundred and 
fifteen, or section thirty-five of chapter seventy-five of the Re- 
vised Laws and the amendments thereof, in so far as the said 
acts pertain to cities having a population of fifty thousand or 
more inhabitants within the meaning of this act, or in so far as 
such acts pertain to the care of diseases other than consumption or 
to the inspection of institutions by the state district health officers; 
but so much of the said acts as requires cities and towns having 
less than fifty thousand population to make hospital provision 
for tuberculosis patients is hereby repealed. [Approved June 1, 
1916. 

Resolves of 1916. 

Chapter 46. 

Resolve providing for an investigation by the state board 
of charity as to the advisability of the acquisition 
by the commonwealth of the suffolk school for boys 
in the city of boston. 

Resolved, That the state board of charity shall investigate and 
determine whether it is expedient for the public interest and for 
the commonwealth to assume the control, care and treatment of 
all juvenile offenders under the law, and to unify under one cen- 
tral authority the training, instruction and reformatory treatment 
of boys in industrial schools, and shall also consider the advisa- 
bility of the acquisition by the commonwealth by purchase or 
otherwise of the land and buildings constituting the Suffolk 
School for Boys in the city of Boston, and of the maintenance of 
the same by the commonwealth. The board shall report the 
result of its investigation, with drafts of any legislation which it 
may recommend, to the next general court on or before the 
second Wednesday in January. [Approved April 11, 1916. 

THE STATE INSTITUTIONS. 

The State institutions under the supervision of the Board 
are: the State Infirmary at Tewksbury; the State Farm at 
Bridgewater; the Norfolk State Hospital; the Lyman School 
for Boys at Westborough; the Industrial School for Boys at 



26 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Shirley; the State Industrial School for Girls at Lancaster; the 
Massachusetts Hospital School at Canton; the North Reading 
State Sanatorium; the Rutland State Sanatorium; the Lake- 
ville State Sanatorium; and the Westfield State Sanatorium. 

The supervisory powers of the Board over these institutions 
extend to the right of investigation and recommendation as to 
any matters relating to the institutions, but the administra- 
tion of each is vested in separate Boards of Trustees. 

One private charitable institution, the Hospital Cottages for 
Children at Baldwinville, is subject to the Board's visitation, 
under the provisions of Acts of 1914, chapter 762. This insti- 
tution has been aided by State appropriations, and has five 
members among its trustees who are appointed by the Gov- 
ernor. 

The State Infirmary and the State Farm are controlled by 
one Board of Trustees. Its membership is as follows: Leonard 
Huntress, Lowell, Chairman; Mrs. Mary E. Cogan, Stoneham; 
Galen L. Stone, Brookline; Nellie E. Talbot, Brookline; Francis 
W, Anthony, Haverhill; Dennis D. Sullivan, Middleborough; 
Walter F. Dearborn, Cambridge. 

The Norfolk State Hospital for the care and treatment of 
inebriates is administered by the following Board of Trustees: 
W. Rodman Peabody, Cambridge, Chairman; Robert A. Woods, 
Boston; Philip R. Allen, Walpole; James J. Phelan, Boston; 
Frank L. Locke, Maiden; Edwin Mulready, Rockland; Otho 
L. Schofield, M.D., Wellesley. 

The Trustees of Massachusetts Hospitals for Consumptives 
administer the four sanatoria, but have no powers over the 
tuberculosis wards of the State Infirmary. The Board is con- 
stituted as follows: Arthur K. Stone, M.D., Boston, Chairman; 
Albert C. Getchell, Worcester; Charles J. Downey, M.D., 
Springfield; Sylvia B. Knowlton, Newton; Daniel L. Prender- 
gast, Brookline; Simon Swig, Taunton; George A. Dunn, 
Gardner. 

The three training or industrial schools fall under the control 
of the Trustees of the Massachusetts Training Schools. The 
Board is as follows: Carl Dreyfus, Boston, Chairman; James 
J. Sheehan, Peabody; Mary Josephine Bleakie, Brookline; 
Matthew Luce, Cohasset; John F. Scully, Brockton; Amy 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 27 

Ethel Taylor, Lexington; Charles M. Davenport, Boston; 
James W. McDonald, Marlborough; Lewis M. Palmer, Fram- 
ingham. 

The Massachusetts Hospital School is administered by the 
following Board of Trustees: Edward H. Bradford, M.D., Bos- 
ton, Chairman; Leonard W. Ross, Mattapan, Secretary; Walter 
C. Baylies, Taunton; William F. Fitzgerald, Brookline; Alfred 
S. Pinkerton, Worcester. 

In addition to the eleven State institutions which the Board 
supervises is Penikese Hospital, the Massachusetts hospital for 
the care and treatment of persons afflicted with leprosy. This 
institution is administered directly by the State Board of 
Charity. For the sake of uniformity and comparison all 
twelve institutions are grouped together in this report. Report 
of the Hospital Cottages for Children will be found with that 
of other private charities in Part II. 

Numbers. 
The total number of cases under care in these State charitable 
institutions during the year was 21,395, a number less by 2,574 
than the corresponding total for 1915. Of the total number, 
16,721 were males and 4,674 were females. Nine thousand four 
hundred seventy were for hospital treatment; 2,292 were 
juvenile delinquents; 7,700 were adult offenders, mostly chronic 
drunkards; and 1,933 were indigent persons, having no legal 
settlement and not included in the above classifications. Of the 
hospital cases, 3,492 were suffering from pulmonary tuber- 
culosis; 1,634 were insane, including 916 at the State Farm 
who were criminally insane. For movement of population see 
Table II. following. 

Capacity. 
The year has witnessed a gratifying decrease in the total 
population of the charitable institutions as a group. The State 
sanatoria are crowded, as always, but with this exception the 
Lyman School is the single institution remaining that shows a 
daily average population in excess of its normal capacity. It 
is to be noted, however, that seven of the entire group have at 
some time during the year had in their care a number in excess 



28 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



of their normal capacity. One of these, the State Infirmary, 
reached an excess of 322, though its daily average was 32 beds 
below the normal capacity. As normal capacity is taken to 
imply permanent quarters for housing and care of inmates, it is 
not to be understood that an excess in numbers over normal 
means no facilities for care. The State sanatoria make tem- 
porary provision by the use of tents, and other devices are 
resorted to in order to provide proper care and comfort for pa- 
tients. Nevertheless, a daily census in excess of the normal 
usually means crowding, with all its attendant risks of fire, 
personal injury and loose discipline. Improved industrial con- 
ditions are responsible for the marked decline in numbers at the 
Infirmary and Farm and at Norfolk State Hospital. 

The accompanying table shows the fluctuations of daily at- 
tendance above and below the normal capacity for each insti- 
tution. 



Capacities of the Several State Charitable Institutions for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1916. 



Institutions 


Normal 
Capacity 


Largest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Smallest 
Number 
present 

at 

Any One 

Time 


Daily ; Increase 
Average ; of Daily 
Number j Average 
present ) over 
during Normal 
the Year Capacity 


Decrease 
of Daily 
Average 

over 
Normal 
Capacity 


State Infirmary .... 


2,336 


2,658 


2,081 


2,304.00 


- 


32.00 


State Farm .... 


3,213 


3,109 


2,524 


2,745.00 


- 


468.00 


Norfolk State Hospital 


400 


293 


110 


198.38 


- 


201.62 


Lyman School for Boys 


413 


479 


436 


448.00 


35.00 


- 


Industrial School for Boys 


240 


258 


182 


220.70 


- 


19.30 


Industrial School for Girls 


299 


290 


237 


266.00 


- 


33.00 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


300 


277 


198 


261.52 


- 


38.48 


Rutland State Sanatorium 
North Reading State Sanatorium 


354 


356 


340 


348.00 


- 


6.00 


194 


202 


195 


200.34 


6.34 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


246 


281 


246 


263.00 


17.00 


- 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


229 


270 


258 


263.78 


34.78 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


19 


12 


9 


10.88 


- 


8.12 


Totals 


8,243 


8,485 


6,816 


7,529.60 


93.12 


806.52 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 29 

Cost of Maintenance. 
The combined appropriations for the maintenance of the 
State charitable institutions in 1916 were $1,969,719.47. The 
total expenditures on the same account were $1,956,414.35. 
Of the sum expended, $726,313.45 was for salaries, wages and 
labor; all other expenses, $1,230,100.90. For the coming year 
the respective Boards of Trustees submit estimates for main- 
tenance appropriations, as shown in Table I. To the tabula- 
tion is added for better comparison the Board's own estimate 
for Penikese Hospital. Estimates for special purposes will be 
considered later in this report under each of the institutions 
separately. 

Comparative View of Movement of Population and of 

Expenditures. 
The movement of population in the twelve institutions is 
shown in brief but comparative form in Table II. Inmates are 
classified by sex, while the daily average attendance appears in 
a column adjoining the average number of officers and em- 
ployees. The average number of persons employed, shown in 
this table, is obtained from an exact analysis of the pay rolls, 
reducing all employment to a basis of days. Table III. affords 
a comparative view of expenditures at all the institutions, clas- 
sified as "current" and " extraordinary." Tables II. and III. 
are drawn in accordance with the statistical form adopted by 
the National Conference of Charities and Correction, May 15, 
1906. 



30 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



33 



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34 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



35 



The Institutions Severally. 
A brief statement relating to the general supervision of each 
institution will be followed by comparative and more detailed 
consideration of financial administration. 



The State Infirmary, Tewksbury. 

John H. Nichols, M.D., Superintendent. 

Numbers. 





Sane 


Insane 


Totals 


INMATES 


a 


a 
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s 

1 


u 
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d 

% 


TO 

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d 


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Number December 1, 1915 . 


928 


345 


405 


1,678 


196 


505 


701 


1,124 


850 


405 


2,379 


Admitted during year . 


2,511 


531 


780 


3,822 


51 


116 


167 


2,562 


647 


780 


3,989 


Discharged during year 


2,613 


573 


812 


3,998 


49 


103 


152 


2,662 


676 


812 


4,150 


Number November 30, 1916 . 


826 


303 


373 


1,502 


198 


518 


716 


1,024 


821 


373 


2,218 



Number of maternity cases, 136. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,852,162.89. 
Normal capacity of plant, 2,336. Value per unit of capacity, 
$792.87. Provides almshouse and hospital care for indigent 
persons not chargeable for support to any city or town. During 
the year 6,368 persons have been under care, 876 less than in 
1915, and 930 less than in 1914. The largest daily census was 
2,658, the smallest, 2,081, the daily average being 2,304. For 
the preceding year the corresponding figures were 3,107 and 
2,341, with a daily average of 2,601.34. 

Seven thousand ninety cases, of which 4,893 were males and 
2,195 females, were treated in the general hospital wards, — 
4,972 medical and 2,118 surgical. In this number were 1,087 
cases of tuberculosis (967 of which were cases of phthisis), 34 
of diphtheria, 3 of typhoid fever, 11 of whooping cough, 62 
of chicken pox. Of the 627 deaths, 259 were from tuberculosis. 
Of the 967 cases of pulmonary tuberculosis in the consumptive 
ward, 802 cases were males, 165 females. Of this number, 6 
were discharged as disease arrested, 18 apparently arrested, 3 
apparently cured, 42 quiescent, 305 relieved, 259 died, 88 not 
relieved. 



36 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Five hundred seventy-seven surgical operations were per- 
formed. 

Of the 136 births at this institution during the year, 74 were 
males and 62 were females. Of this number there were 126 
living births, namely, 68 males and 58 females. Among the 
mothers of these children, 58 were born in the United States, 
18 in Ireland, 4 in England, 18 in the British Provinces, 38 in 
other countries. For an account of this Board's work with 
mother and baby cases at this institution, see page 150, post. 

The daily average number of insane patients was 703. There 
were 49 cases of tuberculosis and 88 deaths in this department. 

Progress in the treatment of syphilitics is still hampered by 
shortage in the supply of neosalvarsan. So great has been the 
difficulty in obtaining sufficient material that treatment has 
been confined to those patients only whose disease is in the 
infectious stage and those who show active symptoms. Other 
cases have been given mixed treatment as usual. 

Since the beginning of this treatment in 1912, 1,092 patients 
have received a total of 4,117 doses of salvarsan, neosalvarsan 
or diarsenol. One hundred thirty-five of these patients have 
been treated during 1916, the doses given totaling 319. The 
laboratory for its part shows 1915 Wassermann reactions done 
during the year, with the following results: positive, 8.4 per 
cent; doubtful, 13.2 per cent; negative, 78.4 per cent. In spite 
of the limitations the report of the year's work in the treat- 
ment of specific cases is very encouraging. 

Next to the Rutland State Sanatorium, the State Infirmary 
affords the largest tuberculosis hospital in the State. The 
total number of cases of pulmonary tuberculosis cared for 
during the year was 967, of whom 802 were males and 165 
females. Eighteen of these were young children. The classi- 
fication of these patients on admission was as follows : incipient, 
54; moderately advanced, 142; advanced, 601; far advanced, 
170. The discharges numbered 451: classified as arrested, 9; 
apparently arrested, 18; quiescent, 42; relieved, 305; not re- 
lieved, 88; died, 259. 

The two important facts to be noticed with regard to these 
classifications are, first, that there have been 64 fewer patients 
in the daily average throughout the year than in 1915, and 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 37 

second, that in spite of this fact the number of advanced and 
far advanced cases received was considerably larger than in 
1915. 

The general decline in totals is attributable to greater activ- 
ity on the part of local hospitals, dispensaries and societies. In 
addition to the figures just given there were 49 cases among the 
insane and 120 cases of other forms of tuberculosis, in which 
latter group there were 18 deaths. 

The greatest emergency demand made upon the institution 
during the year has resulted from the sudden influx of drug 
cases in November. These cases totaled 66. Due to police 
activities in the larger cities at the beginning of winter, all the 
State's facilities were taxed to capacity. Norfolk State Hos- 
pital, with a capacity of 25 beds, was soon filled. Long Island 
Hospital was also congested, and cases were turned toward the 
State Infirmary in ever-increasing numbers. The institution 
has no special facilities for segregation, and is compelled, there- 
fore, to treat such cases in the general wards, — a process 
which, in view of the mental attitude commonly entertained by 
the drug user, is destructive of discipline and detrimental to 
the comfort and safety of the other patients. Since the close 
of the year the emergency has subsided; but it may be pre- 
dicted with assurance that, should the urgent need arise again, 
some special provision for housing drug cases apart will have to 
be provided. 

The superintendent and a loyal staff still struggle against 
increasingly heavy odds to provide for the hundreds of minors 
who find their way to the Infirmary, chiefly through lack of 
accommodation elsewhere. In the past they have sought 
separate housing quarters in an attempt to remove the chil- 
dren from almshouse influences. But this proposal has been 
disapproved by the State Board of Charity as an improper ex- 
pansion of the institution, which if embarked upon would tend 
to make permanent the residence of great numbers of children 
at this almshouse Infirmary where they do not belong. The 
alternative offered by the State Board has been the extension of 
the State's facilities for the care of the feeble-minded, and the 
establishment of hospital provision at the Massachusetts Hos- 
pital School for sick State minor wards. The first of these 



38 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

improvements would remove the majority of the 150 feeble- 
minded children always to be found in residence here, while the 
second would remove from 150 to 200 State wards who are 
constantly occupying the children's ward under treatment. 

But the Legislature, down to the present, has refused both 
these alternatives. Meanwhile the Infirmary trustees have their 
problem. They ought not to have these children, but in fact 
they do have them and perforce must provide for them. It is 
to be hoped the Legislature of 1917 may see its way to grant 
both the State Board's recommendations, looking to better 
classification with its undoubted consequence, — the saving of 
lives. 

The record of infectious diseases for the year is favorable. 
With an average daily population of 2,304 inmates, of whom 
over 400 were children, there were but 34 cases of diphtheria, 3 
cases of typhoid, 63 cases of chicken pox and 11 cases of whoop- 
ing cough. Complete isolation is impracticable with present 
equipment, so that the outbreak of such a disease as diphtheria 
becomes instantly a most serious menace. It is greatly to the 
credit of the institution authorities that these epidemic dis- 
eases made no greater headway. 

As one means of improving the condition of the children, the 
trustees during the year have greatly extended their schooling 
facilities for the little folks. The total enrollment was 220, 
exclusive of some special classes. The total number of classes 
was 33. The number of teachers, 10. Aside from the academic 
instruction, the boys receive practical lessons in manual train- 
ing, which turn the various institution activities to account 
as a method of training. 

With an appropriation of $513,300, a total of $512,081.27 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $176,862.22 was for salaries, wages and 
labor; all other expenses, $335,219.05. Weekly per capita cost 
of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $4,245. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, $26,551.43. Net cost of main- 
tenance to the Commonwealth, $485,529.84. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number 
of inmates, 1 to 6.3. For detailed analysis of receipts and 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 39 

expenditures, see pages 81-108. The trustees estimate that 
$593,409 will be necessary for maintenance in 1917. (See table, 
pages 30, 31.) 

The most important improvement carried on during the year 
has been the construction of the nurses' home, for which the 
Legislature of 1914 granted $72,863. Many delays have been 
encountered in securing materials, so that the building will 
probably not be occupied before the spring of 1917. Minor 
improvements include the installation of 3,000 feet of 4-inch 
water supply pipe from the pumping station to the power 
plant, the erection of a garage at the west gate, the extension 
of a high-pressure steam line to the men's consumptive ward, 
and the addition of 400 feet to the subway system. 

The plant has suffered a loss estimated at $10,000 by the 
burning of the horse stable in the early part of December. 
Several vehicles were burned, but, due to the hard work of 
employees, the 8 horses in the building at the time were all 
rescued. This old wooden stable had been long recognized as a 
fire risk to the institution, so that its removal, in view of the 
safety of the patients, cannot be greatly deplored. 

The trustees ask the following special appropriations, all of 
which are approved by this Board: — 

1. Mechanical handling of coal ...... $14,800 00 

2. Hospital for women . . 162,000 00 

3. Real estate 3,950 00 



$180,750 00 



The first item is a repetition of former years, and seeks on 
economic grounds to make possible the handling of the large 
supply of coal used at this plant without the necessity, as at 
present, of suffering serious limitations in methods of pur- 
chase and considerable demurrage in the process of unloading. 

The second item meets a general need which has grown more 
acute with each succeeding year. Present facilities do not 
permit reasonable classification of the female patients who come 
to the Infirmary. It has been evident for many years that 
steps must be taken on a broad scale to bring the facilities of 
the State Infirmary to the standard of a modern hospital. 



40 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Existing facilities, though administered with care and skill, are 
not such as permit the arrangement necessary to successful 
treatment of the female hospital problem as a whole. 



The State Farm at Bridgewater. 

Hollis M. Blackstone, Superintendent. 

Numbers. 



INMATES 


Pattpers 


Prisoners 


Criminal 

Insane 


» 
Totals 


M. 


F. 


T. 


M. 


F. 


T. 


All Males 


Number December 1, 1915 
Admitted during year 
Discharged during year . 
Number November 30, 1916 . 


621 

891 

1,079 

433 


1 
1 


621 

892 

1,080 

433 


1,287 
3,755 
3,912 
1,130 


173 
579 
574 

178 


1,460 
4,334 
4,486 
1,308 


826 
90 
72 

844 


2,907 
5,316 

5,638 
2,585 


Classificatio 


n of dis 


charge 


s: death 


s, 160; r 


emoval 


3, 5,478. 







Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $1,774,180.77. 
Normal capacity of plant, 3,213. Value per unit of capacity, 
$552.18. 

Provides custodial care for persons of both sexes committed 
by the courts for drunkenness or vagrancy; also almshouse 
care for indigent persons not chargeable to any city or town; 
and hospital care for insane male convicts. Persons committed 
for drunkenness are in almost all cases chronic drunkards. 

During the year, 8,223 persons have been cared for, — 266 
less than last year, and 308 more than in 1914. Largest daily 
census, 3,109; smallest, 2,524; daily average, 2,745. Of the 
whole number under care, 5,794 were prisoners, 1,513 were 
paupers and 916 were insane convicts. The total number of 
commitments was 4,334, of which 3,878, or 89.4 per cent, were 
for drunkenness. Of these 4,334 persons committed, 1,161, or 
26.7 per cent, were returned for violation of parole; 3,181, or 
73.3 per cent, of all these new commitments had served time at 
the State Farm before. Of all commitments, 31.7 per cent 
were made from Boston. A comparative classification of all 
commitments, showing data for nine years, follows: — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



41 



Classification of Commitments. 



Cause 


1907 


1908 


1909 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 


Drunkenness . 


2,900 


3,177 


3,417 


3,783 


4,272 


3,945 


4,136 


3,589 


3,613 


3,878 


Tramping 


78 


144 


99 


107 


90 


67 


66 


113 


76 


37 


Vagrancy- 


263 


505 


359 


350 


419 


381 


331 


395 


467 


296 


All others 


93 


120 


124 


133 


180 


129 


148 


156 


165 


123 


Totals 


3,334 


3,946 


3,999 


4,373 


4,961 


4,522 


4,681 


4,253 


4,321 


4,334 





The total number of persons leaving the institution during 
the year, whether by death, discharge or release on parole, was 
5,638. The deaths numbered 160. 

* It is to be noted that though the total number of persons 
under care during the year in this institution is 266 less than 
the number cared for in 1915, the number of commitments for 
drunkenness increased 265. The whole prison department 
shows a decrease for the year of 20, and the number of de- 
pendents admitted to the almshouse department has decreased 
247. 

The total number of persons under care during the year falls 
266 short of the corresponding total for 1915. At the same 
time, the number of commitments for drunkenness jumped from 
3,613 to 3,878, an increase of 265. The commitments for 
vagrancy and tramping fell short of the previous year by 210. 

Improved industrial conditions have been responsible in the 
main for the large reduction in the total under care. The super- 
intendent states that never in his experience have there been so 
many special or pardon releases in response to requests and 
proffered work by employers. This Board, in the exercise of its 
authority to release inmates of the State Farm, has honored 
the requests of employers for the release of prisoners on their 
undertaking to help keep them straight, wherever the public 
interest or the welfare of the prisoner did not appear to be 
prejudiced. 

Out of an appropriation of $385,750, a total of $385,723.63 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $118,375.80 was for salaries, wages and 



42 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

labor; all other expenses, $267,347.83. Weekly per capita 
cost of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and re- 
funds from maintenance, 82.639. Total receipts from all sources 
other than the State treasury, 821,609.95. Xet cost of main- 
tenance to the Commonwealth, 8364,113.68. Ratio of daily 
average number of persons employed to daily average number 
of inmates, 1 to 14.3. The trustees estimate that 8447,000 will 
be necessary for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) 
For detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 
81-108. 

The Legislature of 1916 granted appropriations for an exten- 
sion of the sewage-disposal system; for ice storage and refriger- 
ation; for repairing the piggery; and for a high-tension electric 
power unit. These have all been satisfactorily installed. 

Another important improvement during the year has been 
the reclaiming of 100 acres of brush land for intensive tillage. 
This extends the acreage fit for tillage to 902. 

For the coming year the trustees ask the following special 
appropriations: — 

1. Colony building 89,000 00 

2. Office building for asylum department .... 4,500 00 

3. New storage barn and young stock 6,500 00 

4. Increased coal dumping facilities 5,000 00 



825,000 00 



These requests represent normal development in the functions 
of the institution. The colony building would permit the ex- 
tension of the right policy of keeping the men on the land. 
The new location, at a distance from the main plant, would 
give the men a smaller group with a valuable classification, and 
would at the same time avoid the necessity of conveying large 
numbers of men back and forth twice each day over a distance 
upwards of two miles. The new barn is essential to central 
storage and to the proper housing of the young stock. The 
coal dumping facilities is a request practically forced upon the 
trustees by the proper requirements of the railroad company. 
Improvements must be effected to save the present trestle. 

These requests are all approved by this Board. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 43 

Norfolk State Hospital. 
Irwin H. Neff, M.D., Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $458,787.10. 
Normal capacity of plant, 400. Value per unit of capacity, 
$1,146.96. . 

Provides care and treatment for inebriates and users of drugs 
in cases not deemed incurable; also detention colony for non- 
criminal chronics. 

This institution was opened for the admission of patients 
June 1, 1914, at which time all the inebriate patients at the 
Foxborough State Hospital were transferred to the Norfolk 
State Hospital. 

During the year 1,642 cases have been cared for, representing 
1,220 separate individuals. Of the whole number, 255 were in 
residence at the beginning of the year. The remaining 1,387 
cases were admitted during the year, while 1,434 were dis- 
charged, leaving 208 at the close of the year. There were 8 
deaths. The total number of admissions include 307 who were 
returned from visits or leave of absence and 659 nominally for 
discharge, the actual admissions being 1,080. Of this number, 
894, or 82.7 per cent, were voluntary, while 186, or 17.2 per 
cent, were committed. 

Nine hundred thirty-five, or 87 per cent, of the admissions 
for the year were alcoholics, and 145, or 13 per cent, were drug 
inebriates. 

The daily average number of inmates was 198.38; largest 
daily census, 293; smallest, 110. 

Lack of a job is the circumstance that encourages drinking. 
As may be expected, therefore, Norfolk State Hospital, for the 
care and treatment of the more hopeful inebriate, is of all our 
State institutions most sensitive to economic conditions in the 
community. During the past year there has been no lack of 
employment, and the hospital in consequence has had an aver- 
age population very little above 200, even though the capacity 
of the plant at the beginning of the year was 270 and had 
risen, through the building of five more cottages, to 400 in 
November. And the decline in alcoholics is the more marked 
by reason of the fact that the number of drug users has in- 



44 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

creased, and threatened, for at least a portion of the year, to 
require emergency measures to house the influx of cases. The 
operation of the Harrison law and the activities of the Boston 
authorities were responsible for this increase in commitments. 

The trustees have continued to pursue their previous vigor- 
ous policy in the development of the out-patient department. 
Looking upon their institution as a link in the process of care 
and treatment of inebriates and drug users, dependent for its 
full effectiveness upon the pre-institution treatment and the 
after-care and follow-up work with paroled patients, they have 
sought to interrelate their work closely with that of the proba- 
tion system and the courts, so that the court may have the 
assistance of experts in the proper disposition of persons found 
guilty. To this end the trustees have extended their branch 
of out-patient offices during the year to include Fall River, 
Lawrence, Salem, Brockton, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Green- 
field, Northampton and Worcester. 

Out of an appropriation of $135,590.47, a total of $125,664.96 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $50,919.81 was for salaries, wages and 
labor; all other expenses, $74,745.15. Weekly per capita cost 
of maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds 
from maintenance, $11,925. 

Total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury, 
$3,381.07. Net cost of maintenance to the Commonwealth, 
$122,283.89. Ratio of daily average number of persons em- 
ployed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 2.4. The trus- 
tees estimate that $149,744.46 will be necessary for mainte- 
nance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For detailed analysis 
of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

The group of five brick cottages with a capacity of 30 beds 
each has been completed, as also the central dining room at 
the oval. These additions place the hospital on a 400-bed basis, 
and serve to smooth out many of the difficulties in early de- 
velopment. 

The trustees request the following special appropriations for 
the coming year : — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 45 

1.. Hospital building and receiving wards for women . . $50,600 00 

2. pottage for women ........ 27,839 00 

3. Sewer and water construction 9,671 00 

4. Outside wiring 600 00 



$88,710 00 



These first two items represent the proposal for an extension 
of the plant for the reception of female inebriates as provided 
in the statutes. The position of the woman who has fallen 
victim to alcoholism or drugs is hard at best. When it becomes 
necessary to place her in an asylum among the insane, or to 
commit her to the women's prison at Sherborn w T ith felons and 
the worst offenders, her condition is hardly improved, and her 
treatment does not savor of remedy. Better classification and 
treatment should be provided. By chapter 73, General Acts of 
1915, the Legislature provided for the commitment of such 
cases to Norfolk State Hospital, but at the same session denied 
the necessary appropriation to prepare for their reception. A 
similar request was denied again last year. This year the re- 
quest is repeated. The State Board of Charity approves both 
items, and urges that they be granted. 

THE STATE TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

TJie Lyman School for Boys at Westborough, the Industrial 
School for Boys at Shirley, and the Industrial School for Girls 
at Lancaster are the three industrial schools provided by the 
State for juvenile delinquents. They are administered by a 
single Board of Trustees known as the Trustees of the Massa- 
chusetts Training Schools, with offices at the State House, 
Boston. 

Boys under fifteen years of age may be committed to the 
Lyman School, and under eighteen years of age to the school at 
Shirley. Girls under seventeen go to the institution at Lan- 
caster. All persons committed remain under the control of the 
trustees during minority. For greater efficiency in administra- 
tion, the Lyman School cares for boys under fifteen, while 
those over that age go to Shirley. 

The total number of persons under care in these three in- 
stitutions during the year was 2,292. Of these, 1,121 were boys 



46 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

under fifteen, all at Lyman School, 652 were boys fifteen a^d 
over, at Shirley, and 519 were girls under seventeen, cared hot 
at Lancaster. 

In the three schools there were, at the beginning of the year, 
985 inmates, namely, 723 boys and 262 girls. One thousand 
three hundred seven were received during the year, and 1,351 
went out either by discharge or upon parole, viz., 1,118 boys 
and 233 girls, leaving 941 on November 30, 1916. 

The year has witnessed a marked decrease in numbers in two 
of the three schools. Lyman school, with a daily average of 
446.38 inmates for the first month of the period, and an actual 
population of 478 on the first day of the year, dropped to an 
average of 428.13 for the last month, and an actual population 
of 441 on the last day. Shirley showed corresponding averages of 
248.17 for the first month and 221.50 for the last, and an actual 
census of 245 and 214, respectively. Lancaster began the year 
with 262 girls and closed with 286. The three schools as a 
group show a decrease of 9 per cent in population during this 
year. 

The reasons appear to be largely economic. Fewer commit- 
ments result from a greater demand for labor, which greatly 
aids the corrective process of probation. The same demand 
aids the parole department in the placement of boys out of the 
schools. Thus with fewer commitments and an enlarged list of 
paroles, the numbers in residence show a welcome decline. 

The combined appropriations for the maintenance of the 
three schools totaled 8291,295. On this account, 8290,805.83 
was expended. Subtracting all receipts from sources other 
than the State treasury, the net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth was 8288,728.52. Details of administration 
and cost are considered under each school separately, as fol- 
lows : — 

Lyman School for Boys, Westborough. 

Elmer L. Coffeen, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 8534,306.51. 
Normal capacity, 413. Value per unit of capacity, 81,293.72. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent 
boys under fifteen years of age. Cottage plan. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 47 

During the year 1,121 cases have been under care, represent- 
ing 689 separate individuals. This total number of cases is 31 
less than in 1915 and 59 more than in 1914. The number in the 
school at the beginning of the year was 478; admissions num- 
bered 643; discharges, 680; remainder at the close of the year, 
441. The daily average number of inmates was 448.5, — 6.5 
more than in 1915. 

The list of causes of admission in the 643 cases received dur- 
ing the year was as follows: absconders returned, 129; assault, 
4; attempting to cash forged order, 1; breaking and entering, 
65; breaking glass, 1; burglary, 1; carrying firearms, 1; de- 
linquent child, 79; larceny, 49; molesting switch, 2; returned 
or transferred from other institutions, not penal, 13; returned 
from place of parole or board, 244; running away, 5; trans- 
ferred by the State Board of Charity, 23; stubbornness, 20; 
setting fires, 4; obtaining money under false pretenses, 1; 
false alarm of fire, 1. Two hundred fifty-seven of the fore- 
going cases were committed by the courts. Of this number, 
160 had been arrested before and 57 had been inmates of 
other institutions. Twelve per cent were of American parent- 
age, 40 per cent were of foreign parentage, 29 per cent of mixed 
parentage, and 19 per cent were unknown. Seven of these boys 
were foreign born, while 249 were born in the United States. 

The industrial value of the print shop and the new shoe-mak- 
ing equipment has been demonstrated anew this year. An 
average of 30 boys are kept in the printing plant learning the 
trade, and incidentally producing all the departmental printing 
work for this school and for the school at Shirley. The shoe 
shop, which now makes all the shoes for these two schools, 
accommodates almost as many. There is now a fair sized list 
of boys who have gone out from Lyman School into the com- 
munity and are earning from $7 to Sll a week at these trades. 

Phelps cottage, situated one-half mile from the main plant, 
houses the younger boys. By the opening of the year its reno- 
vation had been completed and five boys were in residence. 
In the following month the group had increased to 15, and 
in February reached 20, which is the normal capacity of the 
cottage. 

In midwinter of 1916 an epidemic of colds and la grippe kept 



4S STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the hospital department filled with temporary cases. At one 
time in January 50 boys, or one-fifth of the total enrollment, 
were in bed in the hospital. This trouble soon abated, how- 
ever, and the remainder of the year has shown only occasional 
instances of minor ailments. 

Reduction in enrollment has greatly relieved the tension 
caused by the serious overcrowding of the last two years. In 
those years administration was difficult. One slight evidence 
of the fact was the number of boys who took advantage of in- 
creased opportunities and ran away. In 1913 the number of 
absconders was 118. In 1914 it was 116. It is less to the 
credit of the school management to have to report that with 
fewer numbers this year there have been more runaways than 
in any former year in the history of the school. The total 
was 137, and the proportion of such elopements to the average 
daily population 1 in every 3.2. 

In seeking the cause of so many breaches of discipline it 
should be noted that the staff has had much to contend with. 
During the summer the superintendent fell ill, and his condition 
of ill health continued so that in November an extended leave 
of absence was accorded. 

The good results obtained by the parole department con- 
tinue. As this department increases in its scope and effective- 
ness the institution takes its place in an ever more complete 
sense as a step in the process of reformation as contrasted with 
the abandoned institution theory that it is a great unit in 
itself, standing alone. In the present system as applied in this 
State it represents the laboratory reservoir into which children 
are placed for analysis, and from which they are taken as soon 
as it appears that there is a chance for reinstatement in the 
community. The family home is the normal place for the 
child. Institution care is an instrument of public correction 
made necessary by the inability of the child to continue in the 
community without detriment to himself or the public. Such 
process of correction or reformation embodies the closely re- 
lated steps of probation, institution and parole. Xo one step is 
complete without the others, and the recognition of this abso- 
lute dependence of the institution upon its pre-institution and 
its after-care steps is not the least of the results obtained by 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 49 

the intelligent parole system now in operation in connection 
with all three of our State industrial schools. 

With an appropriation of $126,850, a total of $126,848.43 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $52,120.59 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $74,727.84. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $5.40. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $414.42. Net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, $126,434.01. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 
5.1. The trustees estimate that $141,793 will be necessary for 
maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For detailed 
analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

The total expended out of appropriations for special purposes 
was $13,870.86. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following esti- 
mates, with a request for special appropriations covering the 
same : — 

1. Purchase of the Bailey place, adjoining school . . . $5,700 00 

2. Extension and repair of cow barn 3,000 00 

3. Fireproof record vault and fittings 1,450 00 

4. Changes in administration building ..... 1,300 00 



$11,450 00 

Industrial School foe Boys, Shirley. 
George P. Campbell, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $302,470.62. 
Normal capacity of plant, 240. Value per unit of capacity, 
126. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over 
fifteen and under twenty-one years of age. Only boys under 
eighteen may be admitted. 

During the year 652 cases have been cared for, representing 
522 separate individuals. This total number of cases is 33 
more than in the preceding year. The number in the school at 
the beginning of the year was 245. Admissions numbered 407; 
discharges, 438; remainder at the close of the year, 214. The 



50 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

largest daily census was 258; the smallest, 182; daily average, 
220.7. 

The list of causes of admission in the 407 cases received 
during the year was as follows: absconders returned, 75; as- 
sault, 4; assault and battery, 3; attempt to commit rape, 3; 
breaking and entering, 32; breaking and entering and larceny, 
33; carrying weapons, 3; drunkenness, 4; disturbing religious 
assembly, 1; forgery, 4; highway robbery, 1; idle and dis- 
orderly, 4; injuring gravestones, 1; larceny, 83; returned after 
leave of absence, 15; riding freight, 1; robbery, 2; sodomy, 2; 
setting fires, 2; stubborn child, 33; trespass, 2; vagrancy, 2; 
waywardness, 6; returned from parole, 87; returned from in- 
stitutions, not penal, 4. 

Two hundred twenty-one of the foregoing cases were com- 
mitted by the courts. Of the boys thus committed 138 had 
been arrested before and 37 had been inmates of other institu- 
tions. Thirty-nine, or 17.6 per cent, were foreign born, while 
the remaining 187, or 82.8 per cent, were born in the United 
States. The average population of 220.70 exceeds the average 
of the preceding year by 23.58. 

Throughout a considerable portion of the year the organiza- 
tion of this institution has been radically affected by the 
diphtheria epidemics which broke out in the summer of the 
year preceding. It became necessary in the absence of ade- 
quate hospital and isolation facilities to segregate the cottage 
group, making each cottage a unit in itself. No communica- 
tion of any sort between these groups was allowed. As a result 
many functions of the school requiring assembly were inter- 
rupted. The disease finally disappeared upon the approach of 
warm weather and after an isolation camp was established at a 
distance from the center of activities. 

In spite of this serious interruption of daily routine much 
in the way of improvement by the labor of inmates has been 
accomplished. With an unfavorable farming season the in- 
stitution has produced more than half of its food. Land- 
clearing operations have yielded 350 cords of wood. Much 
labor has been supplied by the inmates in hauling materials and 
concreting in connection with the administration building in 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 51 

process of construction. The trustees hope to occupy this new 
building before spring of the coming year. 

In addition to this activity three of the old Shaker cottages 
have been refitted as living quarters for employees, and the old 
tailor shop turned to the same use. 

Out of an appropriation of $82,695, a total of $82,207.70 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $34,703.85 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $47,503.85. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $7,048. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $1,213.93. Net cost of maintenance to 
the Commonwealth, $80,993.77. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 
to 3.8. The trustees estimate that $89,311 will be necessary 
for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For de- 
tailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

The new storehouse was formally opened in March. It will 
accommodate a year's supply of staple commodities. Con- 
struction of the new water tower has not been commenced, but 
materials have been purchased and the work is to be pushed 
forward as soon as the weather permits. 

For the coming year the trustees submit the following esti- 
mates, with a request for special appropriations covering the 
same : — 

1. New cottage for 30 boys and attendants, and for fur- 

nishing, heating and equipping the same . . . $24,500 00 

2. Relocating and renovating a Shaker cottage for use for 

living quarters 1,545 00 

3. Infirmary building, including furnishings .... 26,500 00 

4. Remodeling electric distributing system .... 1,800 00 

5. Furnishing and equipment, finishing off rooms in third 

story, and extension of indirect system of ventilation 

to school rooms, of central building . . . . 4,000 00 



$58,345 00 



The request for a hospital building represents a most urgent 
need. The existing provision for hospital care is a two-room 



52 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

structure capable under favorable conditions of housing 6 
patients. During the year there were 193 boys admitted to this 
hospital. With an average of more than 6 bed cases this build- 
ing cannot be expected to serve the purpose. It is located in 
the center of the institution group, so that isolation is difficult 
if not impossible. During the diphtheria epidemic its use was 
out of the question. As an alternative three cottages were used 
to classify and quarantine the positive cases. The infirmary 
building is unfit for hospital use. The institution group is now 
about 250, and some further provision is therefore impera- 
tive. The State Board of Charity approves all the foregoing 
estimates. 

Industrial School for Girls, Lancaster. 
Amy F. Everall, Superintendent. 

Total valuation of plant, real and personal, $440,917.88. 
Normal capacity of plant, 299. Value per unit of capacity, 
81,474.64. 

Founded 1854 as a private institution. Taken over by the 
State in 1856. 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent 
girls under twenty-one years of age. 

During the year 519 cases have been under care. This total 
is 3 more than in 1915 and 110 less than in 1914. The number 
in the school at the beginning of the year was 262; admissions 
during the year, 257; discharged, including all persons going 
out of the school, 233; remaining November 30, 1916, 286. 
The largest daily census was 290; smallest, 237; daily average, 
266. 

The list of causes of admission in the 257 cases received at 
the school during the year was as follows: common night- 
walker, 2; delinquent, 3; delinquent child, 7; fornication, 
4; habitual truant, 1; idle and disorderly, 8; larceny, 16; 
lewdness, 14; lewd and lascivious, 1; lewd and lascivious per- 
son, 1; lewd, lascivious cohabitation, 1; lewd, wanton and 
lascivious person, 2; lewd, wanton and lascivious in speech 
and behavior, 4; unnatural and lascivious act, 1; returned for 
illness, 7; returned for rest, 5; returned from hospital, 10; 
returned from temporary place; 1; unsatisfactory in place, 9; 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 53 

further training, 2; larceny, 1; untruthfulness, 1; runaway 
girl, 1; running away, 15; planning to run away, 2; immoral 
conduct, 17; in danger of immoral conduct, 2; stubbornness, 
31; stubborn child, 31; stubborn and disobedient child, 3; for 
a visit to the school, 52; returned from visit, 2. 

Of the 233 girls discharged or released during the year 24 
were released on parole to parents or relatives; on parole to 
parents or relatives to attend school, 2; on parole to other 
families or to attend school, earning wages, 3; on parole to 
other families to attend school, earning board, 6; on parole to 
other families for wages, 96; to temporary place, 1; for a visit, 
2; for a visit home, 1; from a visit to the school, 51; ran away 
from Industrial School, 5; transferred to a hospital, 23; com- 
mitted to hospital for insane for observation, 2; committed to 
school for feeble-minded, 15; became of age, 1; over age when 
committed, 1. 

The number of inmates is the smallest in many years, due in 
the main to better economic conditions in the community, 
giving rise to fewer commitments than in times when idleness 
and financial distress are resulting in unfavorable home con- 
ditions. Another cause of the reduced population was the 
transfer of 15 girls to Wrentham State School. 

This transfer marks the partial accomplishment of much 
needed classification and separation of the defective inmates of 
the school. The delinquent who is also markedly defective, 
and by reason of such defect incorrigible and incapable of dis- 
cipline under the system found best adapted to the needs of the 
school generally, is a stumbling block in the way of construc- 
tive results. She gains little for herself while she hinders the 
assistance that might otherwise accrue to her schoolmates. The 
trustees have sought long for opportunity to place such cases 
where they may have care better adapted to their defective 
mental condition. And this process is now being gradually 
carried out. As an indication of the mental status which 
usually obtains in this school, a survey in March resulted in a 
report that 52.9 per cent of the 250 girls then in the school 
passed the twelve-year-old test, and were therefore to be con- 
sidered normal; 27.8 per cent tested four years or less below 
the twelve year standard, while 19.3 per cent appeared from 



54 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

their tests to be committable as feeble-minded. In view of the 
large percentage of defectives always present, it may be ex- 
pected that the defective delinquent of the incorrigible type will 
constantly find her way into this institution and have to be 
removed therefrom by transfer to institutions more appropriate 
to her care. 

The Board is glad to note an increased tendency on the part 
of judges and probation officials to visit this institution. The 
school is at best but one step in a process of community pro- 
tection and the reclaiming for citizenship of these young 
offenders. A thorough understanding, therefore, of the insti- 
tutional process into which the girl will go upon commitment, 
and from which she will emerge upon parole, is necessary to the 
most intelligent determination by the committing justice and 
to the parole or the probation officer. Conferences among such 
officials held at our public institutions are to be encouraged 
even though they make added demands upon time already 
much occupied. 

One rearrangement in furtherance of the disciplinary system 
of the school is to be noted. Mary Lamb cottage, which was 
closed due to the decrease in numbers, was reopened Septem- 
ber 1, as a parole cottage. Here are housed all the girls for 
whom parole is shortly contemplated. They are tried out in 
the matter of self-regulation without the customary supervision. 
They prepare their clothes for departure from the school and 
are considered by the other inmates as a somewhat privileged 
group for whom these special advantages are provided because 
they are showing themselves worthy of parole. This method of 
a probationary period before parole, when the girl can be care- 
fully observed and tested, is an extra aid to the parole system. 
It serves to tide the institution condition over into the extra 
freedom of parole without too much of a change. 

With an appropriation of $81,750, a total of $81,749.70 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
a^nount expended, $37,323.99 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $44,425.71. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $5,864. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $448.96. Net cost of maintenance to 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 55 

the Commonwealth, $81,300.74. Ratio of daily average num- 
ber of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 
1 to 3.7. The trustees estimate that $87,410 will be necessary 
for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For de- 
tailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

The most important improvement during the year has been 
the high-pressure water service, completed in May. This affords 
a pressure of 80 pounds with two leads of hose, — an adequate 
protection in case of fire. 

The trustees ask this year for special appropriations to cover 
four minor improvements, as follows : — 

1. Extension of piggery building by the addition of a wing $700 00 

2. Sidewalks . 500 00 

3. Cleaning reservoir and protecting watershed for reservoir, 

and for purchase of narrow strip of land with springs 

to protect drinking water 1,500 00 

4. Steam-heating system for Putnam cottage; for additional 

radiation for administration building; and for transfer 

of chapel boiler to administration building . . . 3,600 00 



$6,300 00 



Massachusetts Hospital School. 
John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened December 1, 1907. Total valuation of plant, real and 
personal, $366,447.56. Normal capacity of plant, 300. Value 
per unit of capacity, $1,221.49. 

Provides care and schooling for crippled and deformed chil- 
dren. Crippled and deformed children of the Commonwealth 
between ages of five and fifteen and mentally competent to 
attend the public schools are eligible for admission. 

There were 332 children under care during the year. This 
total is 17 more than in 1915 and 21 more than in 1914. 

On December 1, 1915, there were 270 children, namely, 160 
boys and 110 girls, in the school. Sixty-two were admitted, 
and 61 discharged during the year. The maximum number at 
any one time was 277, the minimum, 198, and the daily aver- 
age, 261.52, — a decrease of .66 from the preceding year. Two 
hundred seventy-one remained in residence at the close of the 
year. 



56 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Of the 62 children admitted 31 per cent came as a conse- 
quence of infantile paralysis, while 27 per cent were suffering 
from some form of surgical tuberculosis or deformities resulting. 
The 42 per cent not thus accounted for were afflicted with some 
other of the forms of paralysis, rickets, malnutrition or de- 
formities of congenital origin. The average age on admission 
was eight years and eight months. The oldest child was seven- 
teen years, the youngest, five. Ninety-two per cent of these 
children were born in Massachusetts, but in more than half 
of the cases, at least one parent was born in a foreign country. 

The accomplishment of the institution in reconstructing these 
handicapped citizens is shown this year in greater degree than 
ever before by the attainments of the 61 children who were 
discharged. Ten of these had completed the school grades and 
were ready for high school; 17 had so far recovered that they 
were no longer in need of special care and training as cripples. 
Only 8 of the number died, a low percentage considering the 
unpromising condition which attend these cases upon admission. 
The most discouraging factor in the analysis was the removal 
of 11 children by parents against advice, or when progressive 
decline seemed inevitable. 

As the school attains its rightful place as a regenerative 
process in the life of the community, the need becomes more 
apparent for a field officer who shall bring to the school au- 
thorities more definite knowledge of home conditions into which 
outgoing children are to be discharged. This addition to the 
hospital equipment should be made without delay. 

There has been rather more than the average of minor sick- 
nesses this year. Mumps and chicken pox have formed an 
annoying complication to the medical staff, but no serious set- 
backs resulted. As for the treatment of the primary ailment 
for which the children come to the school, the improvements in 
the numerous cases are astonishing to the layman, and must 
appear to many happy parents as little short of miraculous. 
To the profession they are not more than a high degree of 
skill, applied under most advantageous conditions, can accom- 
plish. 

The State Board of Charity, with the concurrence of the 
trustees, is recommending an extension of the hospital to include 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 57 

the temporary care of sick State wards. This it is believed will 
solve a costly and distressing problem of classification at the 
State Infirmary, and at the same time will provide for this 
large and rapidly increasing group of unfortunates a certainty 
and a continuity in skillful treatment which present arrange- 
ments cannot in the nature of things supply. 

The Legislature last session granted $25,150 for special 
improvements at this institution. Of this sum $13,000 was to 
go for a new wing on the administration building and an en- 
largement of the nurses' quarters. The work has progressed 
slowly, due to difficulty in securing labor and materials, so 
that instead of completion by November 30, as planned, the 
improvement will not be ready until toward spring. The $900 
for extension of the water main and installation of hydrants 
and fire equipment has been spent, and the improvement as 
planned accomplished. A miscellaneous group of improvements 
for which the remaining $11,250 of the total appropriation was 
designated, included a garage, a piggery, a henhouse, a plat- 
form scale and granolithic walks. The garage has been com- 
pleted; the piggery is practically so; the scales, of 20 tons 
capacity, have been installed, and the minor items all attended 
to. 

The trustees, with the approval of this Board, sought an 
additional appropriation of $13,000 of the last Legislature for 
the construction of a second wing on the administration house, 
to be a companion in design to the one granted. Its purpose 
was to provide adequate dining-room accommodations for em- 
ployees and a much-needed bakery. This year the trustees 
repeat their request, the estimated cost to be $15,000. 

Last year the trustees also asked an appropriation of $10,000 
for the purchase of land necessary to the development of the 
institution plant. This was not granted. This year, with the 
approval of the State Board of Charity, they repeat that re- 
quest, the estimated cost to be within $15,000. 

Out of an appropriation of $83,651, a total of $82,021.63 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $36,806.55 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $45,215.08. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 



58 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

maintenance, $6,007. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, 843,083.21. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, $38,938.42. Ratio of daily average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates, 1 to 3.6. The trustees estimate the sum of $97,086 
for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For de- 
tailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

THE STATE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIA. 

The Board's supervision of tuberculosis hospitals covers the 
Rutland, Lakeville, North Reading and Westfield State sana- 
toria, and the tuberculosis wards at the State Infirmary. The 
four separate institutions are administered by one Board, the 
Trustees of Hospitals for Consumptives. 

During the year these four institutions treated 2,525 cases, 
with a combined normal capacity of about 1,000 patients, and 
a daily average population of 1,075.12. 

Of the total number cared for, 1080 were in residence at the 
beginning of the year. The 1,445 admissions during the year 
were offset by the 1,456 discharges, leaving 1,069 on November 
30, 1916. 

Of the 1,445 cases admitted, 264 were classed as incipient; 
577 as moderately advanced; 587 as advanced; 4 as non- 
tubercular; and 12 as undetermined. Eight hundred one were 
males; 644 females. 

The discharges were classified as follows: disease arrested, 
70; apparently arrested, 291; condition improved, 381; con- 
dition not improved, 204; quiescent, 150; non-tubercular, 9; 
died, 224; unclassified because of shortness of stay, 125. Added 
to this classification, North Reading reports 2 discharged with 
disease in progressive form. Thus 742, or 51 per cent, of all the 
discharged cases that were classified were sent away either with 
the disease apparently arrested or with condition improved. 
The corresponding percentage for last year was 56. 

Constant lengthening of the period of stay has gone on 
since 1912 in spite of the fact that advanced cases have been 
received in increasing numbers. In 1912 the average length of 
stay was 186.25 days; in 1913 it was 218.5; in 1914 it was 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 59 

223.25; in 1915 it was 244.25; and in 1916 it had reached 255.9. 
At the same time that the opportunity for treatment and 
special instruction in self care has been increased by the longer 
period of stay, the trustees have pursued their efforts in the 
field of after care, following the patients into their homes, and 
seeking by friendly advice to aid them in the protection of 
their households and the public from infection. This work has 
been experimental hitherto, but may be said to be established 
now as a proper and necessary instrument for rendering the 
work of the institutions more effective. 

Separate report is not made upon the tuberculosis department 
of the State Infirmary. It is considered under the general 
heading of the State Infirmary, at page 36, ante. The four 
sanatoria follow : — 

Rutland State Sanatorium, Rutland. 
Elliott Washburn, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened in 1898. Total valuation of plant, real and personal, 
$590,561.62. Normal capacity of plant, 354. Value per unit 
of capacity, $1,668.25. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. 

During the year 817 patients have been under care. This 
total is 70 more than in 1915, and 8 less than in 1914. Of the 
whole number, 352 were in residence at the beginning of the 
year. The remaining 465 were admitted under the following 
classification, based upon the ascertained progress of the dis- 
ease: incipient, 177, or 38.06 per cent; moderately advanced, 
230, or 49.46 per cent; far advanced, 50, or 10.75 per cent; 
found to be non-tubercular, 3, or .64 per cent; and 5 not classi- 
fied, or 1.09 per cent. Of the new cases, males numbered 233; 
females, 232. Number of patients at the close of the year, 
352. 

The discharges numbered 465, namely, 238 males and 227 
females, classified according to conditions, as follows: disease 
arrested, 45, or 9.6 per cent; apparently arrested, 133, or 28.6 
per cent; improved, 122, or 26.2 per cent; not improved, 69, 
or 14.8 per cent; non-tubercular, 6; died, 20, or 4.3 per cent; 



60 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

quiescent, 49, or 10.5 per cent; unclassified, 21, or 4.5 per cent. 
Daily average number of bed patients, 100, or 28 per cent. 

The average daily census was 348. The largest daily census 
was 356; the smallest, 340. The average for 1915 was 349. 
Average duration of stay of patients for 1916, eight months and 
twenty-nine days. The corresponding average for 1915 was ten 
months and one day. 

As noted last year the admissions and discharges were in- 
creased substantially by the limitation of two years placed upon 
the term of residence by the trustees, and also by the placing 
of all new patients upon a one month's trial basis. The super- 
intendent now recommends a reduction of the residence limit 
to one and one-half years, in the belief that few patients show 
marked benefit from a longer stay. 

With an appropriation of $192,500, a total of $192,498.89 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $71,160.82 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $121,338.07. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from main- 
tenance, $10,415. Total receipts from all sources other than 
the State treasury, $57,546.62. Net cost of maintenance to the 
Commonwealth, $134,952.27. Ratio of daily average number 
of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 
1.77. The trustees estimate the sum of $204,480 for mainte- 
nance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For detailed analy- 
sis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

Two permanent improvements of great value and convenience 
to the institution have been completed during the year. A 
greenhouse has been constructed at a cost of $1,500, and a new 
coal trestle has been completed. This latter improvement 
eliminates the long uphill haul over the road to Muschopauge, 
where teaming was an impossibility in bad weather. The new 
trestle is located near the State highway so that coal can be 
hauled with ease in much larger quantities by the institution 
tractor. 

The trustees submit the following estimates for the coming 
year, with a request for special appropriations covering the 
same: — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 61 

1. Fireproof vault and equipment $2,000 00 

2. New kitchen building, including changes and alterations 

in existing kitchen building and dining halls; including 
all necessary new equipment for cooking and serving 
food; including also installation of a system of artifi- 
cial refrigeration which necessitates a small addition to 
present engine room and the installation of one addi- 
tional boiler 60,000 00 



$62,000 00 



The central kitchen has become a vital necessity to this 
institution. Present storage is inadequate. The kitchen is 
located in a dark basement much overcrowded. There are 
four serving rooms and four dish-washing rooms where true 
economy dictates a single central unit. The present condition 
of things is due to constant growth of needs with a constant 
effort to meet them somehow without requiring new construc- 
tion. The time is now here when such new construction can- 
not be further delayed. The State Board of Charity approves 
both estimates. 

Nokth Reading State Sanatorium* North Reading. 
Carl C. MacC orison, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened September 22, 1909. Total valuation of plant, real 
and personal, $186,725.42. Normal capacity of plant, 194. 
Value per unit of capacity, $962.50. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. 

During the year 473 patients have been under care. Of this 
number, 200 were in residence at the beginning of the year. 
The remaining 273 were admitted under the following classi- 
fication, based upon the ascertained progress of the disease: 
incipient, 10, or 3.6 per cent; moderately advanced, 94, or 
34.43 per cent; advanced, 168, or 61.54 per cent; and 1, 
or .37 per cent, not determined. Sex of patients admitted: 
males, 148; females, 125. There has been a daily average of 
80.2 bed cases, — approximately 40 per cent of the daily pop- 
ulation. 



62 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The discharges numbered 273, namely, 149 males and 124 
females, classified according to condition, as follows: disease 
arrested, 23, or 8.4 per cent; apparently arrested, 26, or 9.5 
per cent; improved, 76, or 27.84 per cent; quiescent, 41, or 
15.02 per cent; 33, or 12.09 per cent, unimproved; non- 
tubercular, 2, or .73 per cent; died, 48, or 17.58 per cent; 
unclassified because of shortness of stay, 24, or 8.7 per cent. 
Of the patients discharged, the average duration of residence in 
the sanatorium was two hundred forty days, as opposed to one 
hundred ninety days for the preceding year. Number of 
patients at the end of the year, 200. 

The largest daily census was 202; the smallest, 195; average, 
200.34. The average for 1915 was 198.33, and for 1914, 194.53. 

Thirty-nine cases have been supported from private funds; 
245 cases by cities and towns; 133 cases entirely by the State; 
and 6 private cases have later become either town or State 
charges. 

Out of an appropriation of $91,500, a total of $91,491.21 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $38,057.37 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $53,433.84. Weekly per capita cost of main- 
tenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $8,697. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $29,420.79. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, $62,070.42. Ratio of daily average num- 
ber of persons employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 
to 2.5. For detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see 
pages 81-108. The trustees estimate the sum of $98,053.50 for 
maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) 

The important improvements completed during the year were 
the medical building for which $4,665 was appropriated in 1915, 
and the fireproofing of the power plant. This latter improve- 
ment was authorized by an appropriation of $21,880, and de- 
creases a fire hazard which the trustees and this Board have 
always considered to be a menace to the lives of these sick 
patients and those whose duty it was to care for them. 

The trustees request special appropriations to cover the fol- 
lowing recommendations : — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 63 

1. Hospital building $68,285 00 

2. Administration building 65,096 00 



$133,381 00 



The overcrowding of the hospital quarters has reached a 
point where the daily census must be reduced or the facilities 
must be extended. There must be a reduction in the number 
of bed cases or there must be more beds. A new hospital 
building has therefore become a necessity, in view of the con- 
stant pressure of a long waiting list of prospective patients. 

Due partly to the increased need of nurses and attendants 
caused by this contemplated expansion, and partly to the ex- 
cessive overcrowding in the present employees' quarters, an 
addition is required to provide more housing for the staff. 
The most economical method of doing this is to build a proper 
administration building and combine its use with the present 
administration house for the accommodation of the staff. The 
State Board of Charity approves both estimates. 

Lakeville State Sanatorium, Lakeville. 
Sumner Coolidge, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened January 5, 1910. Total valuation of plant, real and 
personal, $250,972.30. Normal capacity of plant, 246. Yalue 
per unit of capacity, $1,020.21. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. During the year 685 cases have 
been under care. This total number of cases is 17 less than in 
1915, and 40 less than in 1914. Of the whole number, 260 were 
in residence at the beginning of the year. The remaining 425 
cases were admitted under the following classification, based 
upon the ascertained progress of the disease: incipient, 2, or 
less than 1 per cent; moderately advanced, 186, or 44 per cent; 
advanced, 230, or 54 per cent; not considered, 6; and 1 not 
tubercular. Males numbered 280; females, 145. 

The discharged cases numbered 434, namely, 288 males and 
146 females, classified according to condition, as follows: dis- 
ease arrested, 2, or one-half per cent; improved, 153, or 35 per 
cent; quiescent, 20, or 5 per cent; not improved, 65, or 15 per 



64 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

cent; died, 101, or 9 per cent gain over 1915; non-tubercular, 
1; progressive, 2; apparently arrested, 26, or 6 per cent; un- 
classified because of shortness of stay, 64, or 15 per cent. Two 
hundred fifty-one remained on November 30. 

Daily average number of patients was 263. The largest 
daily number was 281; the smallest, 246. The average for 1915 
was 257. Average duration of stay of the 434 discharged pa- 
tients, 176.9 days. The corresponding average for 1915 was 
176.9 days. 

Of the total number of cases cared for during the year 5 
per cent were supported from private funds; 53 per cent were 
supported from municipalities; 33 per cent were supported by 
the Commonwealth; 9 per cent were cases whose settlements 
were unknown. 

With an appropriation of 8120,700, a total of 8120,698.32 
was expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, 848,977.94 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, 871,720.38. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, 88.694. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, 836,568.95. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, 884,129.37. Ratio of daily average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates', 1 to 2.8. The trustees estimate the sum of 8141,015 
for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For de- 
tailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 81-108. 

Last year the Legislature granted the long-continued prayer 
of the trustees for an institution dairy. The appropriation 
was to cover a purchase of land and the construction of a cow 
monitor, with some remodeling. This improvement has been 
satisfactorily completed and the herd installed, insuring for the 
first time a supply of milk for the patients, the quality and the 
condition of which are within the control of the institution. 

One other large improvement has been completed, — a coal 
trestle of capacity sufficient to make possible the purchase of a 
year's supply of coal at the season when the price is low. 

For the coming year the trustees request the following special 
appropriations: — 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



65 



1. Addition to power plant and laundry: — 

Addition to building $12,000 00 



1 72-inch horizontal returntubular boiler 

Setting same 

10-ton refrigerating engine 

Connecting new boiler 

Addition to laundry . 

Contingencies 

Architect's fees 6 per cent 

2. Improvements at dairy farm: 

House 

Head barn .... 



3. Storehouse 

4. Pavilion for 20 patients 



2,053 00 
950 00 
3,000 00 
2,000 00 
5,150 00 
1,000 00 
1,569 18 



$2,000 00 
1,000 00 



$27,722 18 



3,000 00 
5,000 00 
3,000 00 

58,722 18 



Enlargement of the power and service units has become 
necessary through normal growth of the plant and through 
deterioration of existing machinery, so that it is no longer safe 
to run without sufficient additional heat and power to provide 
a duplicate unit in case of breakdown. There is at the present 
time a lack of sufficient capacity in the boiler room and in the 
laundry to meet daily demands. 

The proposed pavilion would furnish care the year round for 
20 patients, which number is at the present time cared for only 
in the summer months in tents, and must be turned away 
during the cold weather. 



Westfield State Sanatorium, Westfield. 
Henky D. Chad wick, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened February 16, 1910. Total valuation of plant, real 
and personal, $243,915.31. Normal capacity of plant, 229. 
Value per unit of capacity, $1,065.13. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with pulmonary tuberculosis. 

During the year 550 cases have been under care. This total 
is 32 less than in 1915, and 88 more than in 1914. Of the whole 
number, 268 were in residence at the beginning of the year. 



66 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The remaining 282 cases were admitted under the following 
classification, based upon the ascertained progress of the dis- 
ease: incipient, 75, or 26 per cent; moderately advanced, 67, 
or 24 per cent; advanced, 139, or 50 per cent. Nearly all the 
incipient and most of the moderately advanced cases were chil- 
dren. Of the new cases, males numbered 140; females, 142. 
A daily average of 72.69 were bed patients, of whom 16 per 
cent were children. 

The discharged cases numbered 284, namely, 140 males and 
144 females, classified according to condition, as follows: dis- 
ease apparently arrested, 106, or 37.6 per cent; quiescent, 40, 
or 14 per cent; improved, 30, or 10.5 per cent; not improved, 
37, or 13 per cent; died, 55, or 19.3 per cent; unclassified 
because of shortness of stay, 16, or 5.6 per cent. 

The daily average number of patients was 263.78. The largest 
daily number was 270; the smallest, 258. The average for 
1915 was 258.81. Average duration of stay of patients, three 
hundred thirty-eight days. The corresponding average for 1915 
was three hundred six days. 

Of the 282 admissions, 26 paid their own board, 175 were 
supported by cities and towns, 54 were State charges, and the 
status of 27 has not yet been determined. 

With an appropriation of $127,200, a total of $127,200 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of the 
amount expended, $50,458.77 was for salaries, wages and labor; 
all other expenses, $76,741.23. Weekly per capita cost of 
maintenance, computed on expenses less sales and refunds from 
maintenance, $9,108. Total receipts from all sources other 
than the State treasury, $46,680.62. Net cost of maintenance 
to the Commonwealth, $80,519.38. Ratio of daily average 
number of persons employed to daily average number of in- 
mates, 1 to 2.6. The trustees estimate the sum of $142,968 
for maintenance in 1917. (See table, pages 30, 31.) For 
detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see pages 
81-108. 

An experiment in feeding employees by the cafeteria method 
was tried at this institution in the -summer of 1915. This plan 
proved so successful that during 1916 it was extended to the 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 67 

patients, all ambulatory cases over twelve years of age being so 
served. A report of progress at the close of the year showed 
that due to costlier service nothing has been saved in labor, 
but a reduction of no less than 33 per cent has been effected in 
table waste. Invariably, therefore, the plan is a money saver. 
As to the physical effect upon the patient, no detriment is ap- 
parent, but it is too early to report with finality upon the 
system. It is still in the experimental stage. 

The farm and dairy equipment has been increased by the 
addition of a storage and horse barn, a stable for young stock 
and a dairy room, for which improvements an appropriation of 
$8,284.84 was granted in 1916. 

This year the trustees ask special appropriations for the 
following purposes: — 

1. Garage, carpenter shop and root cellar .... $7,500 00 

2. Dormitory: — 

Estimated cost of construction . . . $5,400 00 
Heating, lighting and sewer . . . 2,000 00 

Furnishings 500 00 

7,900 00 

3. Superintendent's house 9,000 00 

4. X-ray machine 2,50000 

5. Sewage filtration beds . . 7,500 00 

6. Fireproof vault . 1,500 00 

$35,900 00 

Items 1 and 6 are repetitions from last year. The garage 
and shop is necessary to proper care of the institution's vehicles. 
Item 5 is asked for largely at the instance of the State Board of 
Charity, and because all conversant with present conditions 
realize that the undersized and heavily saturated beds now in 
use are totally inadequate to meet the need. A menace to the 
health of the institution is therefore likely to arise at any time 
unless the filtration surface can be extended to keep pace with 
the growth in population. 

The dormitory for ex-patient employees meets a need now 
critical. The housing of employees who are ex-patients has 
long been a problem at the State sanatoria. No adequate pro- 



68 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

vision exists at Westfield, and should be supplied, considering 
the advisability of retaining this class of help. In line with 
this needed expansion comes a demand for more room for the 
employees generally. This could be provided by the construc- 
tion of a dormitory in addition to the one asked for this year, 
but the same end appears to be most economically attained by 
taking the superintendent's suite in the administration building 
for this use and housing the superintendent in a separate cottage. 
The State Board of Charity approves all the foregoing 
estimates with the qualification that the improvement for sew- 
age filtration is approved for 85,000 only. 



PEXIKESE HOSPITAL, PEXIKESE ISLAND. 
Frank H. Parker, M.D., Superintendent. 

Opened November 17, 1905. This institution is administered 
directly by the Board. Total valuation of plant, $141,885.72. 
Normal capacity, 19. Value per unit of capacity, $7,467.67. 

Provides hospital care and treatment for persons afflicted 
with leprosy. 

During the year 13 patients have been under care. This 
total is 1 less than last year -and 2 less than in 1914. Eleven of 
the patients cared for were in residence at the beginning of the 
year. Two were admitted and 4 died, leaving 9 on November 
30, 1916. 

Of the patients remaining at the close of the year 7 were 
suffering from the disease in the tubercular form, 1 in the 
anaesthetic and 1 mixed. The average age of the patients was 
37.6 years; 3 were married; 1 a widow; 2 of the total were 
females. All, save one, were of foreign race and nationality. 
The races or places of origin represented are as follows: Italian, 
1; Portuguese, 2; Chinese, 3; Russian, 1; Greek, 1; Turk, 1. 

The first (Case 30) of the two patients admitted during the 
year was born in the United States, of American parentage. 
He was a sailor in his youth and spent several years on the 
Pacific slope and in . South America. He was aged and infirm 
when admitted, being far advanced in the anaesthetic type of 
the disease. He remained in the institution from December 9, 
1915, to January 23, 1916, when he died. 



Part I ] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 69 

The other new patient (Case 31) is an Asiatic Turk, aged 
forty, born in Asia Minor. He came to this country about 
three years prior to admittance. When diagnosed he was found 
to be suffering from the tubercular form of the disease, well 
manifest. 

On August 7 a third patient, a student (Case 32), was appre- 
hended by the Boston board of health and isolated at the South 
Department. He was a native of Cuba. Upon the production 
of proper guarantees safeguarding the public this patient was re- 
leased to his family in Cuba, so that he never reached Penikese. 

Of the 4 patients who died during the year, 2 (Cases 16 and 
30) died of leprosy; 1 (Case 21) of acute laryngitis; and 1 
(Case 13) of spasm of the glottis. All were in a far advanced 
stage of leprosy. One of these (Case 13) had been over nine 
years on the island. 

The condition of the patients has shown a slow but steady 
advance of the disease. Careful diet and fresh air remain as 
before the fundamentals of treatment. Of the special methods 
employed, the use of chaulmoogra oil yields by far the best 
results. One patient, whose condition was complicated by a 
severe attack of rheumatoid arthritis early in the year, has been 
greatly improved, apparently as a result of this treatment. 

Dr. James A. Honeij, resident physician, severed his connec- 
tion with the State service on January 31, 1916. The results 
of his laboratory studies in leprosy, made in collaboration with 
Simeon B. Wolbach, M.D., pathologist, of the Harvard medical 
faculty, have received appreciative recognition from leprosy 
experts in many countries. The Board desires to register here 
its high estimate of his valuable services. 

On June 14 Dr. William J. McDonald took up his duties as 
the new resident physician. Dr. McDonald is a graduate of 
Harvard Medical School. He was engaged in research work. 
He comes to this new field of activity with that enthusiasm for 
pathological research which is so necessary in the conduct of 
this isolated institution. 

In August a party of 40 physicians, including the district 
health officers of the State Department' of Health, visited the 
hospital, for the purpose of observing the condition of the 
patients and familiarizing themselves with the various clini- 



70 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

cal manifestations of the disease. Visitations of this nature, 
though they occur at infrequent intervals, are of great value to 
the medical profession and to the community, in that they help 
the physician to detect the disease more readily. 

The greatest single administrative problem of the year has 
been the shortage of fresh water. The supply is secured from 
surface wells, from which it is forced to the reservoir at the 
highest point of the island. Salt water is used where possible 
for domestic purposes. By February there was little better 
than 4 feet of water in the reservoir; this represented about 
44,000 gallons. By May, thanks to the unusual snowfall of 
the early spring, the level had risen to 10 feet, the highest in 
eighteen months. By September, after a hot dry summer, it 
had fallen to 2 feet, and use had been restricted to certain 
hours of the day. October afforded one good rain, and added a 
few inches to the supply. The restrictions on use had to be 
continued. November proving to be another very dry month, 
50 barrels of water were brought down from New Bedford, and 
the year closed with the water shortage more of a quandary 
than at any time in the past three years. The Board con- 
templates an extensive study of water supply in the Elizabeth 
Islands, with a view to determining the most economical 
method of securing a permanent supply for Penikese. 

The building of an adequate roadway from the wharf to the 
farm buildings was undertaken this year. The old road has 
been difficult even in the best of weather. Because of the steep 
incline and the bowlders upon its surface, hauling in bad weather 
was impossible. By dint of much labor the surface had been 
leveled throughout the greater length and a proper top surfacing 
added at the point of steepest incline. Other outdoor activities 
have been of the usual sort. During the coming year extensive 
repairs must be made on the wharf. Much of the planking and 
not a few of the timbers show decay that renders its use danger- 
ous and its power to withstand the sea doubtful. 

Out of an appropriation of $28,233, a total of $28,228.61 was 
expended for the maintenance of this institution. Of this 
amount, $10,545.74 was for salaries, wages and labor; all other 
expenses, $17,682.87. Ratio of daily average number of persons 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



71 



employed to daily average number of inmates, 1 to 1. For 
detailed analysis of receipts and expenditures, see treasurer's 
statement following, and also pages 81-108. 

Treasurer's Report. 
To the State Board of Charity. 

I respectfully submit the following report of the finances of 
this institution for the fiscal year ending November 30, 1916: — 



Balance December 1, 1915 



Cash Account. 



Institution Receipts. 
Sales : — 

Medical and general care . 
Farm and stable: — 
Cows and calves, bull 
Hides .... 

Total institution receipts 



Receipts. 



$55 00 
8 65 



$0 75 



63 65 



$64 40 



Payments. 
To treasury of Commonwealth, institution receipts 



$64 40 



Maintenance. 
Appropriation, current year . . . . . . . $28,233 00 

Expenses (as analyzed below) ....... 28,228 61 



Balance reverting to treasury of Commonwealth 



$4 39 



Analysis of Expenses. 
superintendent 



Salaries, wages: — 

Frank H. Parker, M.D. 
General administration 
Medical service 
Ward service (male) . 
Ward service (female) 
Farm and stable 



Travel, transportation and office expenses 
Automobiles 

Postage .... 
Printing and binding . \ 
Stationery and office supplies 
Telephone and telegraph 
Travel .... 



$2,500 00 

5,146 43 

1,196 24 

559 31 

675 12 

468 64 



$12 00 

72 30 

9 90 

84 36 

22 24 

303 30 



$10,545 74 



Amounts carried forward, 



$504 10 $10,545 74 



72 



TATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1 



Amounts brought forward. 

Travel, transportation and office expenses 
Sundries ..... 
Freight ..... 
Office expenses .... 



Food: — 

Butter .... 
Beans .... 
Bread, crackers, etc. . 
Canned soups . 
Cereals, rice. meal. etc. 
Cheese .... 
Flour .... 

Fish ^fresh. cured and canned) 
Fruit (fresh) 

Fruit (dried and preserved) 
Lard and substitutes . 
Macaroni and spaghetti 
Meats .... 
Milk (fresh and substitutes) 
Molasses and syrups . 
Peanut butter, pie filling, etc. 
Potatoes .... 
Seasonings and condiments 
Sugar .... 
Tea, coffee, cocoa, etc. 
Vegetables (fresh) 
Vegetables (canned and dried) 
Yeast, baking powder, etc. 
Sundries .... 
Freight .... 

Clothing and materials: — 
Boots, shoes and rubbers 
Clothing (outer) 
Clothing (under) 
Dry goods for clothing 
Hats and caps . 
Leather and shoe findings . 
Machinery for manufacturing 
Socks and small wares 
Freight .... 

Furnishings and household supplies 
Beds, bedding, etc. 
Carpets, rugs. etc. 
Crockery, glassware, cutlery, etc. 
Dry goods and small wares 
Fire hose and extinguishers 
Furniture, upholstery, etc. . 
Kitchen and household wares 
Laundry supplies and materials 

Amounts carried forward, 



$504 10 $10,545 74 



s — Con. 



160 30 




1S7 17 




25 50 






S77 07 




$311 67 




27 7S 




27 56 


, 


12 60 




100 00 




23 43 




173 52 




133 90 




261 36 




59 95 




29 77 




5 49 




1,819 70 




7 90 




22 40 




3 75 




204 20 




71 16 




209 72 




175 07 




118 57 




45 95 




50 39 




58 49 




303 98 






4,258 31 




$117 67 




123 86 




74 54 




45 40 




2 90 




3 97 




1 00 




72 68 




88 97 






530 99 


$57 SO 


15 60 




41 33 




66 65 




126 00 




33 72 




315 23 




153 53 




$839 86 


$16,212 11 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



73 



Amounts brought forward, 



$839 86 $16,212 11 



Furnishings and household supplies — Con. 
Lavatory supplies and disinfectants 
Table linen, paper napkins, towels, etc. 
Sundries ...... 

Freight ...... 



Medical and general care: — 
Books, periodicals, etc. 
Entertainments, games, etc. 
Funeral expenses 
Gratuities 

Ice and refrigeration . 
Laboratory supplies and apparatus 
Medicines (supplies and apparatus) 
Medical attendance (extra) 
School books and supplies 
Sputum cups, etc. 
Tobacco, pipes, matches 
Water 
Sundries . 
Freight . 



Heat, light and power: — 

Coal $1,703 53 

Freight on coal and other expenses .... 369 32 

Electricity . 80 49 

Gas 50 66 

Oil 81 31 

Operating supplies for boilers and engines . . . 490 39 

Sundries . . . 59 88 

Freight . 305 30 



219 59 




112 95 




27 18 




93 48 






1,293 06 




$16 95 




15 02 




370 00 




8 30 




71 97 




287 78 




1,320 21 




22 45 




21 00 




25 00 




34 51 




37 93 




3 00 




236 20 






2.470 32 















3,140 88 


arm and stable: — 




Bedding materials ....... $30 48 




Blacksmithing and supplies 










26 00 




Fencing materials 










35 86 




Fertilizers . . . 










88 81 




Grain, etc. 










1,485 08 




Hay 










391 78 




Harnesses and repairs 










33 14 




Horses .... 










135 00 




Other live stock 










9 00 




Rent .... 










3 50 




Spraying materials 










20 58 




Stable and barn supplies 










17 37 




Tools, implements, machines, etc 










52 05 




Trees, vines, seeds, etc. 










109 69 




Veterinary services, supplies, etc. 










5 40 




Sundries .... 










75 08 




Freight .... 










229 47 








2,748 29 




Amount carried forward, ........ 


$25,864 66 



74 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Amount brought forward, . 

Grounds: — 

Labor (not on pay roll) 
Road work and materials . 
Tools, implements, machines, etc 
Trees, vines, shrubs, seeds, etc. 
Freight .... 



Repairs, ordinary: — 

Cement, lime, crushed stone, etc. 

Electrical work and supplies 

Hardware, iron, steel, etc. . 

Labor (not on pay roll) 

Lumber, etc. (including finished products) 

Paint, oil, glass, etc. . 

Plumbing and supplies 

Steam fittings and supplies 

Tools, machines, etc. 

Dynamos, repairs 

Engines, repairs 

Sundries ..... 

Freight ..... 



Repairs and renewals: — 

Wharf, cement walks, painting, engine and storm porches 

Total expenses for maintenance .... 

Special Appropriations. 
Balance December 1, 1915 ...... 

Appropriations for fiscal year ..... 

Total 

Expended during the year (see statement annexed) . 
Reverting to treasury of Commonwealth 





$25,864 66 


$65 00 




1 28 




16 87 




48 87 




11 13 






143 15 


$35 51 


84 65 




133 35 




147 34 




301 75 




170 23 




98 47 




22 50 




102 23 




3 05 




89 50 




26 20 




107 80 






1,322 58 




j 


898 22 




$28,228 61 




$429 97 




207 20 



$182 59 



S637 17 



182 59 



Balance November 30, 1916 



$454 58 



Per Capita. 
During the year the average number of inmates has been 10.88. 
Total cost for maintenance, $28,228.61. 
Equal to a weekly per capita cost of $49,895. 
Receipts from sales, $64.40. 
Equal to a weekly per capita of $0.1138. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



75 



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CO 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OF THE INSTITUTIONS. 

The Board in its supervision of the financial administration 
of the several State charitable institutions — the plant and its 
upkeep and maintenance — inspects each institution through 
paid officers monthly, and through its own committees and 
individual members at frequent intervals. 

Monthly analysis is made of articles of food, coal, hay and 
grain purchased, and tabulated results sent to each institution. 
In addition, sundry tabulations covering the year's operations 
have been prepared. The Board has co-operated with the 
several institutions in bringing about the joint consideration 
of purchasing supplies, resulting in regular conferences upon 
matters of common interest, especially functions of purchasing. 
In 1915, and this year also, the Board has been instrumental in 
bringing about the joint purchase of such staple articles as in- 
candescent lamps. In the case of lamps, a large saving has 
been made in the total outlay. 

The following tables are designed to show in detail the 
financial condition of each institution. A convenient summary 
of the State's property represented by each institution is fol- 
lowed by an analysis of receipts and a similar analysis of ex- 
penditures. Finally, a more detailed analysis of expenditures is 
followed by a comparison of all appropriations and the ex- 
penditures made therefrom. 

I. Inventory. 

Inventory of State property represented by the institutions is 
shown in Table IV. This tabulation is in four parts. Parts I. 
and II. exhibit realty; Part III. shows personalty; Part IV. 
summarizes the whole. 

From Parts I. and II. it appears that on November 30, 1916, 
the twelve State charitable institutions returned $5,843,250.22 
in real estate, $387,199.81 of this amount being land and 
$5,456,050.41 representing buildings. Chattels Real and other 
items of betterment are not separately considered; hence 
water, telephone, fire and sewerage systems are to be found 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 77 

in the miscellaneous columns under the heading of "build- 
ings." 

hV Part III. shows the uniform analysis of personal property 
adopted by the State Auditor, to the amount of $1,300,083.48. 
The total valuation, real and personal, as shown in Part IV., is 
$7,143,333.70. 



:s 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



81 



Table IV. Part IV. — Inventory of the State Charitable Institutions 

Concluded. 





Summary 




INSTITUTIONS 


REAL AND PERSONAL 


ESTATE 


Total 


Real 
Estate 


Personal 
Estate 


Total 


Inventory 


State Infirmary .... 


$1,598,716 90 


$253,445 99 


$1,852,162 89 


$1,852,162 89 


State Farm 


1,381,944 00 


392,236 77 


1,774,180 77 


1,774,180 77 


Norfolk State Hospital 


373,609 62 


85,177 48 


458,787 10 


458,787 10 


Lyman School for Boys . 


408,083 37 


126,223 14 


534,306 51 


534,306 51 


Industrial School for Boys 


237,011 26 


65,459 36 


302,470 62 


302,470 62 


Industrial School for Girls 


380,269 16 


60,648 72 


440,917 88 


440,917 88 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


299,679 87 


66,767 69 


366,447 56 


366,447 56 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


534,518 92 


56,042 70 


590,561 62 


590,561 62 


North Reading State Sanatorium . 


135,558 27 


51,167 15 


186,725 42 


186,725 42 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


187,692 53 


63,279 77 


250,972 30 


250,972 30 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


191,094 49 


52,820 82 


243,915 31 


243,915 31 


Penikese Hospital .... 


115,071 83 


26,813 89 


141,885 72 


141,885 72 


Totals 


$5,843,250 22 


$1,300,083 48 


$7,143,333 70 


$7,143,333 70 



II. Receipts. 
Table V. is designed to show every item of income to each 
institution from whatever source for whatever purpose, except- 
ing certain private funds, casting all together for ready com- 
parison. The tabulation also shows such of the receipts as 
under the law are available for maintenance purposes in 1917. 
According to this table the total receipts from all sources were 
$2,731,332.27. Of this amount, $2,464,347.92 was received from 
the State treasury, and the remainder, $266,984.35, came in on 
account of the institution, through board of patients, sale of 
products or otherwise. Of this latter figure, $216,681.26 is 
available for maintenance purposes in 1917. The sanatoria 
show a steady decline, as for many years, in the amount of re- 
ceipts collected for board of patients. 



82 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17, 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 83 



III. Expenditures. 

Table VI., divided into four parts, shows all expenditures of 
whatever nature on account of the several institutions. Part I. 
deals with maintenance only. Part II. exhibits outlays for 
special purposes, divided into four headings, namely, "land," 
" buildings," "furnishings and equipment" and "miscellaneous." 
In Part III. are shown all moneys expended for purposes so far 
apart from the institution proper as to fall outside the uniform 
classifications. With two exceptions trustees' expenses appear 
in the miscellaneous column under "maintenance." These two 
exceptions are expenses of the trustees of the training schools 
and of the trustees in charge of the State sanatoria. Because 
of various duties these two Boards of Trustees have appropria- 
tions apart from the grants for their institutions. Part III., in 
addition to these special outlays, shows also the industries fund 
administered by the trustees in charge of the State Farm. 
This fund is self-perpetuating, and, though a State outlay, is so 
far separate as to require individual treatment in the classifica- 
tion. Part IV. summarizes the whole. 

The table shows that $1,956,414.35 was spent for mainte- 
nance exclusive of expenditures for special purposes mentioned 
in Part II., which amounted to $232,656.68. By adding to 
these amounts $275,276.89 for sundry expenditures, as shown 
in Part III., we find a grand total of $2,464,347.92 expended on 
account of the twelve institutions. The abnormally high prices 
that have prevailed and still continue for all food products and 
materials account, as indicated above, for the relatively low in- 
ventory at the end of the year, and foreshadow much larger 
total outlays for 1917 with correspondingly higher per capitas. 

In addition to the total expenditures as indicated above, two 
institutions — Lyman School and the Industrial School for 
Girls — - have private trust funds which are administered for 
the benefit of inmates, but independently of the State's invest- 
ment. The custody of each is vested in the State Treasurer, 
whose duty it is to invest the same and to pay therefrom at the 
request of the trustees. Three of those trusts — the Lyman 
fund, the Lyman trust fund and the Lamb fund — apply to 
Lyman School, while the Fay, the Mary Lamb and the Rogers 



S4 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Book funds pertain to the Industrial School for Girls. From 
these sources a total of S323.46 was expended during the year, 
of which SI 3. 67 was for books out of the Rogers fund, and the 
balance from the Lyman fund, the Lyman Trust and Mary 
Lamb funds. The major part of the outlay was for entertain- 
ments, drill and band equipment, athletic goods, lectures, prizes 
and similar miscellaneous items. 

IV. Analysis of Maintenance and Xet per Capita Cost. 
The uniform analysis of maintenance expenditures comprises 
twelve classes or divisions, namely, " salaries and wages;" 
''religious instruction;" "travel, transportation and office ex- 
penses;" "food;" "clothing and materials;" "furnishings and 
household supplies;" "medical and general care;" "heat, 
light and power;" "farm and stable;" "grounds;" "repairs, 
ordinary;" and "repairs and renewals." Table VII. is corre- 
spondingly divided into thirteen parts, the last of which is a 
summary of the whole, and shows for each of the twelve in- 
stitutions the total cost of maintenance for each of the main 
headings in the analysis. It further shows all receipts from 
sales or refunds; the difference, which is the net cost to the 
institution; and the average net weekly per capita cost to 
the institution, with a* column showing the corresponding per 
capita for the three-year period just ended. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



85 



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S6 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table VI. Part II. — Expenditures of the Several State Charitable 
Institutions for the Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1916. 









For Special Purposes 


INSTITUTIONS 


Land 


Buildings 


Furnishing 

and 
equipping 


Miscella- 
neous 


Total 


State Infirmary . 
State Farm . 
Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 
Massachusetts Hospital Schc 
Rutland State Sanatorium 
North Reading State Sanato 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 


>ol 
rium 




$1,574 38 
6,500 00 


$38,626 27 
1,007 23 

52,572 01 
1,091 14 

21,213 19 

5,785 04 

1,499 28 

16,690 01 

144 96 

7,989 06 


$401 42 

1,307 50 
12,779 72 

29 95 

80 43 

15,047 05 

2,284 71 

182 59 


$1,451 56 

1,435 57 

14,317 00 

4,037 24 
4,275 59 

8,600 92 
7,036 81 

3,973 16 
722 89 


$40,479 25 

2,442 80 

69,770 89 

13,870 86 

25,250 43 

4,305 54 

14,466 39 

8,536 09 

16,690 01 

25,665 17 

10,996 66 

182 59 


Totals .... 




$8,074 38 


$146,618 19 


$32,113 37 


$45,850 74 


$232,656 68 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



87 



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88 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



Table VI. 



Part IV. — Summary of Expenditures for the Fiscal Year 
ending November 30, 1916. 









Sundry 




INSTITUTIONS 


Maintenance 


Special 
Purposes 


Purposes 

apart 

from the 

Institutions 


Total 


State Infirmary 


$512,081 27 


$40,479 25 




$552,560 52 


State Farm 


385,723 63 


2,442 80 


$4,853 07 


393,019 50 


Norfolk State Hospital 


125,664 96 


69,770 89 


- 


195,435 85 


Lvman School for Bovs 


126,848 43 


13,870 86 


230 17 


140,949 46 


Industrial School for Boys 


82,207 70 


25,250 43 


- 


107,458 13 


Industrial School for Girls 


81,749 70 


4,305 54 


93 29 


86,148 53 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


82,021 63 


14,466 39 


- 


96,488 02 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


192,498 89 


8,536 09 


- 


201,034 9S 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


91,491 21 


16,690 01 


- 


108,181 22 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


120,698 32 


25,665 17 


- 


146,363 49 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


127,200 00 


10,996 66 


- 


138,196 66 


Penikese Hospital .... 


28,228 61 


182 59 


- 


28,411 20 


Trustees, Massachusetts Training 










Schools ...... 


- 


- 


65,435 64 


65,435 64 


Trustees, Massachusetts Hospitals for 










Consumptives .... 


- 


- 


204,664 72 


204,664 72 


Totals 


$1,956,414 35 


$232,656 68 


$275,276 89 


$2,464,347 92 



Table VII. Part I. — Analysis of Expenditures for Maintenance and 
Net Weekly Per Capita Cost of Maintenance of the Several State Chari- 
table Institutions for the Fiscal Year ending November 30, 1916. 





Salaries and Wages 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 

from 
Refunds 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 

Years 
1913, 1914 
and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 

State Farm 

Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 


$176,862 22 
118,375 80 
50,919 81 
52,120 59 
34,703 85 
37,323 99 
36,806 55 
71,160 82 
38,057 37 
48,977 94 
50,458 77 
10,545 74 


- 


$176,862 22 
118,375 80 
50,919 81 
52,120 59 
34,703 85 
37,323 99 
36,806 55 
71,160 82 
38,057 37 
48,977 94 
50,458 77 
10,545 74 


$1 472 

827 

4 922 

2 231 

3 015 
2 690 

2 699 

3 921 
3 643 
3 571 
3 668 

18 588 


$1 280 
817 
3 587 
2 195 
2 783 
2 385 

2 489 

3 897 
3 633 
3 456 
3 906 

16 497 


Totals 


$726,313 45 


- 


$726,313 45 


- 


- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



89 



Table VII. Part II. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. • — ■ Continued. 





Religious Instruction 1 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 

from 
Refunds 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 

Years 
1913, 1914 
and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 

State Farm 

Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys . 
Industrial School for Girls . 
Massachusetts Hospital School . 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 


SI, 846 00 
1,969 00 
1,045 96 
1,485 83 
1,070 00 
1,400 00 
1,540 00 
1,362 30 
1,424 00 
1,245 60 
1,199 20 


- 


$1,846 00 
1,969 00 
1,045 96 
1,485 83 
1,070 00 
1,400 00 
1,540 00 
1,362 30 
1,424 00 
1,245 60 
1,199 20 


$0 015 
013 
101 
063 
092 
100 
112 
075 
136 
090 
087 


$0 013 
010 
072 
063 
072 
085 
113 
074 
133 
089 
092 
016 


Totals 


$15,587 89 


- 


$15,587 89 


- 


- 



Analysis for 1915 and 1916 only. 



Table VII. Part III. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Travel, 


Transportation and Office Expenses 




Total 


Receipts 
from 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY per capita 


INSTITUTIONS 




Average 
for 




expended 


Refunds 
or Sales 


1916 


the Three 
Years 












1913, 1914 












and 1915 » 


State Infirmary .... 


$8,580 77 


_ 


$8,580 77 


$0 071 




State Farm 


5,390 42 


- 


5,390 42 


037 


— 


Norfolk State Hospital 


4,719 00 


$0 55 


4,718 45 


456 


— 


Lyman School for Boys 


2,809 86 


50 


2,809 36 


120 


Industrial School for Boys . 


1,728 74 


— 


1,728 74 


150 


— 


Indu strial School for Girls . 


1,332 18 


- 


1,332 18 


096 


— 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


3,120 46 


- 


3,120 46 


228 


- 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


3,893 03 


88 67 


3,804 36 


209 


- 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


1,762 06 


32 26 


1,729 80 


165 


_ 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


2,328 19 


- 


2,328 19 


169 


_ 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


4,313 40 


- 


4,313 40 


313 


_ 


Penikese Hospital 


877 07 


- 


877 07 


1 546 


- 


Totals 


$40,855 18 


$121 98 


$40,733 20 


- 


- 



Analysis for 1916 only. 



90 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table VII. Part IV. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Food 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 


8172,911 91 


$15 58 


$172,896 33 


$1 439 


$1 107 


State Farm 


121,144 62 


32 00 


121,112 62 


846 


741 


Norfolk State Hospital 


24,270 03 


32 61 


24,237 42 


2 343 


2 210 


Lyman School for Boys 


25,410 02 


39 00 


25,371 02 


1 086 


939 


Industrial School for Boys . 


13,257 60 


- 


13,257 60 


1 152 


1 122 


Industrial School for Girls . 


12,575 89 


- 


12,575 89 


906 


817 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


18,025 12 


2 60 


18,022 52 


1 321 


1 412 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


71,384 48 


759 37 


70,625 11 


3 892 


3 976 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


31,584 35 


10 85 


31,573 50 


3 022 


2 928 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


33,433 68 


782 24 


32,651 44 


2 380 


2 606 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


30,100 05 


632 18 


29,467 87 


2 142 


2 625 


Penikese Hospital 


4,258 31 


- 


4,258 31 


7 506 


5 311 


Totals 


$558,356 06 


$2,306 43 


$556,049 63 


- 


- 



Table VII. Part V. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Clothing and Materials 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY per capita 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 


$29,870 08 


$1,463 77 


$28,406 31 


$0 236 


$0 179 


State Farm 


28,965 13 


1,279 58 


27,685 55 


193 


204 


Norfolk State Hospital 


4,857 26 


33 51 


4,823 75 


466 


477 


Lyman School for Boys 


7,721 00 


33 67 


7,687 33 


329 


393 


Industrial School for Boys . 


5,983 68 


- 


5,983 68 


519 


514 


Industrial School for Girls . 


3,796 44 


— 


3,796 44 


273 


326 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


3,242 85 


37 91 


3,204 94 


235 


176 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


103 87 


— 


103 87 


005 


004 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


219 52 


57 28 


162 24 


015 


013 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


8 89 


28 05 


_ i 


— 


001 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


1,127 62 


- 


1,127 62 


081 


053 


Penikese Hospital 


530 99 


- 


530 99 


936 


1 159 


Totals . . . . . 


$86,427 33 


$2,933 77 


$83,493 56 


- 


- 



Receipts exceed expenses by $19.16. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



91 



Table VIJ. Part VI. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Furnishings 


a.nd Household Supplies 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 


$26,589 61 


_ 


$26,589 61 


$0 221 


$0 134 


State Farm 


12,240 84 


$61 34 


12,179 50 


085 


079 


Norfolk State Hospital 


5,501 70 


2 00 


5,499 70 


531 


476 


Lyman School for Boys 


5,018 43 


2 45 


5,015 98 


214 


100 


Industrial School for Boys . 


2,863 64 


- 


2,863 64 


249 


174 


Industrial School for Girls . 


3,599 69 


- 


3,599 69 


259 


166 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


2,752 08 


1 35 


2,750 73 


201 


143 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


7,770 77 


151 85 


7,618 92 


419 


291 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


2,693 92 


32 41 


2,661 51 


254 


263 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


4,945 23 


84 35 


4,860 88 


354 


366 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


6,856 43 


- 


6,856 43 


498 


360 


Penikese Hospital . . • . 


1,293 06 


- 


1,293 06 


2 279 


1 254 


Totals 


$82,125 40 


$335 75 


$81,789 65 


- 


- 



Table VII. Part VII. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 







Medical 


and General Care 






Total 


Receipts 
from 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 




Average 
for 




expended 


Refunds 
or Sales 


1916 


the Three 
Years 












1913, 1914 












and 1915i 


State Infirmary .... 


$20,501 71 


$310 93 


$20,190 78 


$0 168 




State Farm 


17,353 69 


— 


17,353 69 


121 


- 


Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 


7,610 70 


7 54 


7,603 16 


735 


- 


5,864 48 


2 25 


5,862 23 


250 


- 


Industrial School for .Boys . 


4,179 02 


- 


4,179 02 


363 


— 


Industrial School for Girls . 


2,083 09 


— 


2,083 09 


150 


- 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


2,565 51 


1 44 


2,564 07 


188 


- 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


5,944 13 


57 93 


5,886 20 


324 


- 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


2,445 60 


41 81 


2,403 79 


230 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


2,273 19 


11 50 


2,261 69 


164 


- 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


3,162 03 


23 01 


3,139 02 


228 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


2,470 32 


75 


2,469 57 


4 353 


- 


Totals . . . 


$76,453 47 


$457 16 


$75,996 31 


" 


- 



Analysis for 1916 only. 



92 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table VII. Part VIII. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Heat, Light anp Power 




Total 


Receipts 
from 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 




Average 
for 




expended 


Refunds 
or Sales 


1916 


the Three 
Years 












1913, 1914 












and 1915 


State Infirmary .... 


$24,278 68 


_ 


$24,278 68 


$0 202 


$0 327 


State Farm 


38,990 36 


- 


38,990 36 


272 


244 


Norfolk State Hospital 


12,807 89 


$8 55 


12,799 34 


1 237 


858 


Lyman School for Boys 


13,873 09 


- - 


13,873 09 


594 


537 


Industrial School for Boys . 


4,468 14 


- 


4,468 14 


388 


414 


Industrial School for Girls . 


8,293 89 


- 


8,293 89 


598 


539 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


6,672 50 


- 


6,672 50 


489 


467 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


16,473 84 


75 


16,473 09 


907 


892 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


6,070 20 


25 


6,069 95 


581 


516 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


7,969 40 


6 00 


7,963 40 


580 


446 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


9,737 43 


- 


9,737 43 


707 


578 


Penikese Hospital 


3,140 88 


- 


3,140 88 


5 536 


2 465 


Totals 


$152,776 30 


$15 55 


$152,760 75 


- 


- 



Table VII. Part IX. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 



INSTITUTIONS 



Farm and Stable 



Total 
expended 



State Infirmary . 
State Farm . 
Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Rutland State Sanatorium . 
North Reading State Sanatorium 
Lakeville State Sanatorium 
Westfield State Sanatorium 
Penikese Hospital 

Totals . 



$18,980 94 

30,746 51 
7,352 96 
8,536 48 

11,262 81 
7,490 98 
5,175 23 

10,631 37 
3,614 11 

12,007 29 
9,359 72 
2,748 29 



$127,906 69 



Receipts 
from 
Sales 



$176 59 

6,069 57 
173 81 
200 76 

1,052 07 

408 38 

54 95 

2,451 79 
432 18 
554 56 

1,266 17 
63 65 



$12,904 48 



Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 



$18,804 35 

24,676 94 

7,179 15 

8,335 72 

10,210 74 

7,082 60 

5,120 28 

8,179 58 

3,181 93 

11,452 73 

8,093 55 

2,684 64 



$115,002 21 



WEEKLY PER CAPITA 



1916 



$0 156 
172 
694 
356 
887 
510 
375 
450 
304 
835 
588 
4 732 



Average 

for 
the Three 

Years 
1913, 1914 
and 19151 



1 Analysis for 1916 only. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



93 



Table VII. Part X. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. • — Continued. 





Grounds 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 19151 


State Infirmary .... 


$621 69 


_ 


$621 69 


$0 005 


_ 


State Farm 


252 56 


- 


252 56 


001 


- 


Norfolk State Hospital 


939 78 


- 


939 78 


090 


- 


Lyman School for Boys 


33 78 


- 


33 78 


001 


- 


Industrial School for Boys . 


216 51 


— 


216 51 


018 


- 


Industrial School for Girls . 


183 80 


- 


183 80 


013 


— 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


169 18 


- 


169 18 


012 


- 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


71 18 


• — 


71 18 


004 


- 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


686 50 


- 


686 50 


065 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


939 61 


- 


939 61 


068 


- 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


96 51 


- 


96 51 


007 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


143 15 


- 


143 15 


252 


- 


Totals 


$4,354 25 


- 


$4,354 25 


- 


- 



Analysis for 1916 only. 



Table VII. Part XI. — 


Analysis 


of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 


Capita, etc. — 


- Continued. 






Repairs, Ordinary 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 
from 
Sales 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY per capita 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 19151 


State Infirmary .... 


$27,162 66 


$25 20 


$27,137 46 


$0 223 


_ 


State Farm .... 


8,599 79 


520 30 


8,079 49 


056 


— 


Norfolk State Hospital 


5,639 87 


2,051 91 


3,587 96 


346 


- 


Lyman School for Boys 


3,554 31 


69 56 


3,484 75 


149 


- 


Industrial School for Boys . 


2,173 74 


— 


2,173 74 


188 


— 


Industrial School for Girls . 


2,263 37 


- 


2,263 37 


163 


- 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


1,947 26 


6 25 


1,941 01 


142 


- 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


3,121 54 


2 00 


3,119 54 


171 


- 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


2,136 99 


26 79 


2,110 20 


202 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


5,200 53 


— 


5,200 53 


379 


— 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


5,057 40 


— 


5,057 40 


367 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


1,322 58 


- 


1,322 58 


2 331 


- 


Totals 


$68,180 04 


$2,702 01 


$65,478 03 


- 


- 



1 Analysis for 1916 only. 



94 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Table VII. Part XII. — Analysis of Expenditures and Net Weekly Per 
Capita, etc. — Continued. 





Repaiks and Renewals 




Total 
expended 


Receipts 

from 
Refunds 


Net Cost 

to the 
Institution 


WEEKLY PER CAPITA 


INSTITUTIONS 


1916 


Average 

for 
the Three 












1913, 1914 












and 19151 


State Infirmary .... 


13,875 00 


_ 


$3,875 00 


$0 032 




State Farm 


1,694 91 


- 


1,694 91 


011 


- 


Norfolk State Hospital 
Lyman School for Boys 


- 


- 


— 


- 


- 


420 56 


- 


420 56 


018 


- 


Industrial School for Boys . 


299 97 


$45 00 


254 97 


022 


- 


Industrial School for Girls . 


1,406 38 


- • 


1,406 38 


101 


- 


Massachusetts Hospital School . 


4 89 


- 


4 89 


0003 


- 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 


581 56 


- 


581 56 


032 


- 


North Reading State Sanatorium 


796 59 


- 


796 59 


076 


- 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


1,368 77 


- 


1,368 77 


099 


— 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


5,731 44 


- 


5,731 44 


416 


- 


Penikese Hospital 


898 22 


- 


898 22 


1 583 


- 


Totals 


$17,078 29 


$45 00 


$17,033 29 


- 


- 



Analysis for 1916 only. 



Part LI GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



95 



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96 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



V. Comparison of Appropriations and Expenditures 

THEREFROM. 

Table VIII. affords comparison of appropriations for mainte- 
nance with the respective amounts expended therefrom. Ap- 
propriations are classified as "receipts available for mainte- 
nance" and "appropriations in addition to such receipts." All 
receipts at the four sanatoria, the Hospital School and the 
Norfolk State Hospital, though turned, like receipts of all the 
other institutions, into the State treasury, are by law applicable 
to maintenance in the succeeding year. Receipts at the remain- 
ing institutions are not so applied. By this comparison the 
total maintenance expenditures were $13,305.12 less than the 
amounts appropriated. This balance reverts into the treasury. 

Receipts of 1915 available for maintenance in 1916 totaled 
$346,933.93. This sum was received largely on account of 
board of patients at the State sanatoria and the Hospital 
School. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



97 



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98 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



VI. Appropriations for Special Purposes. 
The total of appropriations for special purposes during 1916 
as shown by Table IX. was $233,787.04. In addition to this 
amount the several institutions began the year with a total of 
$186,604.07 unexpended balance on previous special appropria- 
tions. The grand total available for 1916 was, therefore, 
$420,391.11. The amount expended from this total was 
$232,656.68, leaving an unexpended balance of $187,734.43, of 
which $186,862.80 will be available in 1917. The small re- 
mainder of $871.63 reverts to the State treasury. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



99 



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100 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

VII. Net Cost to the Commonwealth. 
The net cost to the State of maintaining or conducting each 
institution is the difference between total expenditure and the 
total receipts from all sources other than the State treasury. 
This total outlay must cover all moneys spent for maintenance 
and special purposes, together with all expenditures for sundry 
purposes apart from the institution, and interest on outstanding 
bonds. These items are compared in Table X. For conven- 
ience, the daily average number of inmates and the net weekly 
per capita cost to the State are added. This tabulation shows 
a daily average number of inmates of 7,529.60, and expendi- 
tures for all purposes of $2,537,563.07. Total receipts from 
institutions, i.e., sources other than the State treasury, amounted 
to $266,984.35. The net cost to the State for all twelve institu- 
tions amounted to $2,270,578.72, making the net weekly per 
capita cost to the State $5,782. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



101 



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102 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

VIII. Analysis of Pay Roll. 
Table XL, divided into six parts, shows a comparative anal- 
ysis of the pay roll for each of the twelve institutions. The 
first iive parts divide service into five classes, namely, "general 
administration," "medical service," "ward service," "repairs" 
and "farm, stable and grounds." Part six summarizes the 
whole. The table also shows the full roster, that is, the number 
of employees deemed necessary to carry on the institution effi- 
ciently, and in opposite columns the daily average number em- 
ployed in 1915 and 1916, with the same average for the three- 
year period ending November 30, 1915. The same treatment is 
given the average monthly compensation and the weekly per 
capita cost. Thus it appears that the full roster for all the in- 
stitutions together was 1,467. The total average number em- 
ployed was 1,379.424, while for the three-year period preceding 
1916 it was 1,320.235. The total average monthly compensa- 
tion paid was $565,268 as against $550,283 in the preceding 
three-year period. Miscellaneous and incidental employment 
not entered upon the pay rolls of the institutions does not appear 
in this tabulation. The number of inmates to one employee is 
slightly less in most of the institutions. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



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00 


1-H 


(M 


CO 


CO 


1-1 


US 


us 


US 


CO 


CO 


w 


->** 


CM 


CO 


^ 


">* 


OS 


CO 




H 




e£ 
























CO 


g 
§ 


1 




























۩ 































































«< 


H 




t~ 


o 


t>. 


t^ 


00 


CO 


00 


US 


§ 


OS 




CO 




<3 




•* 


US 


os 


OS 


t^ 


us 


CM 


'JH 


OS 




OS 


OS 


>q 


-< 


8 


CM 


US 


CM 


t^ 


US 


CO 


CD 




** 




CO 


CO 


■* 


«* 


K 


• ©> 


CO 


0O 


CO 


00 


05 


US 


OS 


t^ 




CO 


3 


g 


00 


a 


a 


iH 


"3 


US 


US 


us 


CO 


t^ 


** 


<M 


Ttl 


Tt< 


CD 


m 


> 




«£ 
























CO 
6© 


fe 


<! 






























o 


































«T 
































For the 
Three 
ears 191 

1914 
and 1915 


■«* 


o 


o 


w 


t^ 


CO 




CM 


CM 


o 


3 


t~ 


o 






H 

O 
►J 


SO 


CO 


CM 

o 


US 


OS 

US 


oo 

CO 


s 


s 


CM 


CM 


o 

CN) 


8 




o6 


us 


CO 


CO 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


CO 


OS 


3 


rJl 


CO 


00 




t>. 


US 


CM 


*"* 






C>^ 


2 


CO 


■* 








Ph 


JH 






























a 




























































B 






00 


US 


1 


US 


US 


tM 


CO 


OS 




"HH 


CO 


§ 






CO 


s 


2§ 




CO 


CM 




t» 


CO 


CO 


CO 






e> 


oo 




OS 


o 




oo 


^ 


CM 


O0 


1® 


OS 




8 


CO 


US 


00 


00 


O 


o 


CO 


CM 


00 


CO 


CO 


o 




rHj 


MS 


CO 


1—1 






CO 


tH 


>* 


■* 


■* 




CM 




P 


















1—1 










us 




2 
































a 
































































«! 




<M 


cm 


CO 


CO 


-* 


3 


^- 


CM 


•* 


CM 


1^ 




3 




K 




us 


o 


CO 


00 


CO 


(T<1 


CO 


r^ 


OO 


"# 






a 


1 


"3 


os 




<M 


»~] 


CO 


O 


os 


us 


t>- 


OS 


o 


US 




5 


oo 


00 


ss 


00 


d 


CO 


g 


CO 


i 


oi 


£ 


<* 


CO 
































US 






— CD 


<N 


OS 


CO 


^ 


(M 


o 


i—l 


US 


o 


CO 


!>• 


s 


!>. 






CM 


US 


OS 




t>. 


t^ 


CD 


US 


CO 


t>. 


I>. 


OO 








■* 


■«* 


"<*H 


CO 


■* 


CO 


o 


CO 


1-H 




o 


"* 






3 TO 


(M 


cm 


o 


CO 


os 


t^ 


_H 


o 


o 


00 


CO 


US 


OS 






OS 


CO 


CO 








CO 


3 


<* 


M* 


■* 




us 
























a 














02 

2 

H 






'cS 


02 

>> 


DQ 


5 


"o 

1 

CO 


a 
s 

C3 

a 
a 
02 


=3 

1 

C3 

a 

a 


a 

.5 

"C 
o 


a 
.a 

o 










H 


in 




o 

w 


«2 


(-1 
o 

"o 

o 


a 

o 


'a 

CO 


1 

m 
to 

a 

1 

h 

O 


C3 
G 
c3 
02 

O 

■»a 

c3 

m 
a 

V 

i 


■+a 

a 

02 


7a 








h-t 


u 
c3 

a 

H 

o 

C3 
&2 


a 

M 

fa 
O 

-^> 
c3 


0> 

-*a 
cS 

02 

u 
o 


M 

a 

Xfl 

a 

I 


■a 

1g 

=! 
CJ 

1— 1 


-=3 
o 

m 

a 


03 

03 

1 

1 


1 

w 
a 


c3 

2 

cC 

o 


'a 
o 
K 

o 

CO 

03 

"a 

& 

fa 


CO 

Is 



104 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 









£g s« 


CO 


i^ 


oo 


CO 


© 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


CO 










erage 
eThr 
Years 
13, 19 
id 191 




o 


IT- 


m 


«* 


© 


CO 


-*l 




© 


CO 


>* 












o 


■* 


© 


© 






CO 


(M 




CO 


■* 








OQ 

o 


O 






















eo 


1 






<: 


^ ss 
































































































5s 




© 


CO 


CO 


8 


CO 




t-» 


© 


■* 




CO 


•*n 








•«j 




in 


eo 


m 


© 


CO 


CO 


m 


© 


© 




© 








Q 


in 


*" ' 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 


T -1 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 




. 






K 


en 


o 






















^ 








H 


iH 


e© 






























& 


































(H 






































































CO 


CO 


>o 


© 


^ H 


o 


© 


in 


© 


eo 


3 


o 










t^ 


CO 


"* 


m 


rfl 


© 


-* 


m 


© 




m 












© 


«* 


© 








CO 


CO 


CO 




eo 








o 






















CO 












^ 
































of 


































m rH "» 


m 


C<1 


oo 


w 


o 


lO 


CO 


ss 


CO 


© 


© 


f» 


m 








For thi 

Three 

Years 19 

1914 

and 191 




t^ 


CO 


w 




1^ 


»o 


in 


■* 


CO 


.m 


m 






J 


OS 




© 


m 




« 


CO 


o 


© 


■* 


CO 


S- 


© 


"3 

CD 






H 

Oh 


"# 


_ 




lO 


© 


© 




t^ 


3 


HH 


© 


© 






8 


3 


CO 


U3 


CO 


© 


LO 


© 


© 


© 


© 


1 


a 




O 
o 


























s 
































■+3 




W 
^ 






























C3 






o 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


© 


© 


© 


© 




© 




O 


a 


lO 


© 


§ 


§§ 


CO 
CO 


CO 
CO 


s 


O0 
CO 


in 

CO 




© 
»n 


o 


eo 
eo 


e 


o 


o 
> 




OS 


fe- 
es 




© 

CO 


§ 


CO 
CO 


© 
us 


O0 

© 


© 


3 


CO 


1 


cS 


CO 

eo 


1 


« 




6© 






















CO 




1 


a 
































02 






























S3 


•Si 


h3 






























"S 


< 


«i 




eo 


t^ 


uo 


fe» 


© 


00 


CO 


TH 


s 


<M 


<# 


© 


00 




o 


03 




00 


OS 


§ 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■* 


CO 


00 




eo 


!"~i 


s 


> 


(0 




CO 


1-1 


—* 


O0 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 




00 


in 


("-i 


a 


0) 


fe~ 


CO 


oo 


CO 


© 


© 


5* 


oo 


© 


CO 


00 


m 


2? 


© 


% 


<! 




o 




CO 


in 


w 


«o 


fe- 


fc. 


00 


CO 


© 


t^ 


fe~ 


an- 






eo 


rt 


'- ' 














*"• 




rt 




sa 
































B» 


<3 
































Oh 






in 


00 


r- 


© 


CO 


lO 


es 


00 


CO 


© 


^ 


© 


eo 


00 

•<s> 
co 
535 








8 


s 


in 


8 


CO 
CO 


g 


00 

«n 


s 


e 


CO 
CO 


8 


8 




o 


*5 §ST3 


in 


»>" 


CO 


co' 




co' 


co' 


to" 


co" 




co' 




oo 


*§ 






























§ 




K 




co 


CO 


© 

s 


§ 


8 


3 


CO 


© 
© 


OS 


g 


t^ 


§ 


eo 


^ 




PQ 


in 


m 


© 


o 


t^ 




© 


© 


© 


CO 


© 


m 




et 


oo 


©" 


CO 


co' 


CO* 


■* 


co" 


•* 


co' 


CO 


eo' 


,h' 


eo* 


1 




»-i 


























m 


1 




































































O 


































< 




«o 


© 


§ 

o 




tti 


CO 


© 


CO 


© 


© 


CO 


CO 


t- 


EH 




PS 
> 


to 


00 


CO 
CO 


§ 


8 


5 


« 


© 


O0 


s 


OS 


s 


m 
eo 


<1 




en 


©' 


©' 


eo 


co' 


CO 


CO 


co' 


"*■ 


eo' 


eo' 


_J 




oo' 




<! 


*H 




























Ph 














































*a 


OS 


•^ 


lO 




CO 


CO 


m 


CO 


§8 


© 






— 01 


8 


© 


CO 
CO 


© 


CO 


© 


in 

CO 


S6 


© 

CO 


s 


© 
© 


© 
eo 


H 








!>" 


!>■ 


in 


•-» 


co' 


«* 


co' 


«* 


co' 


^ 


co' 




m 


►h 
































pq 


































< 


































































H 






02 














1 




£ 

3 

i 

rt 
















o 










09 


^2 


5 


£ 

o 
c 

02 


£ 


£ 












2; 


>S 




"7A 

8 
K 


o 

8 


o 

ffl 

1 


1 


m 

2 
ft 

1 


c 

rt 

m 

02 
M 


3 

•a 

o 
rt 
3 
rt 
02 
o 


3 

"C 

o 
a 
a 

m 

1 

m 
*a 

"3 


'S. 

s 

K 










-t 


S-l 

C3 

a 


2 

1 


& 

08 


1 

O 


■8 

43 


43 
o 

a 

'C 

■is 


03 

! 

-a 


02 


c 

rt 

P4 


rt 
02 


1 


1 








I 

02 


1 


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1 


C3 

s 

>> 




3 

a 


1 


ci 

I 


s 


1 


Js4 

'£ 
Pi 


eS 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



105 



"0 
d 

.a 

d 

o 
O 



Sss 







Is s§ 
































^ 


© 


CI 


,_, 


o 


,_, 


us 


s 


CO 


S§ 


CM 


1-H 








S-S §s« 






cm 


§ 


OS 


CO 


OS 


US 


co 


US 








"5 


CO 


-* 


o 


CM 


00 


US 


t^ 


us 


l^ 


I>- 






s 

O 


Avera 

theT 

Ye* 

1913, 

and * 


s 






*■« 


^ 


^ 












«N 




































Eh 
































































5 




© 


CM 


00 
00 


§§ 


CO 


CO 


^ 


s 


s 


s 


§ 


US 






O 


us 
i-i 


"*" 


CO 


US 


CO 


o 


CM 


oo 


us 


l> 


US 


t- 


CO 


l 




« 


0> 


£ 






rH 


*"" 


""* 












■* 






Ph 
































*H 
































i-3 




US 


© 


© 




"># 


o 


CM 


OS 


!>• 


o 


cs 


"1< 








t— 






3 


oo 


OS 


US 


CO 


<* 


o 


!>• 








E 


CO 


"3 


CO 


t^ 




CO 


OS 


us 


t^ 


>o 


OO 


■>* 






O 






1— 1 


T_| 


,_, 












eo 


' 






*-* 


&$ 
































oo 


gg 


I>- 




CS 


■* 


s 


t^ 


CO 


OS 


© 


«* 


© 






^ 8rH*JIO» 


CO 


o 


CI 


t^. 


t^ 




OS 


o 


CM 


CO 


us 






o 


CM 


CO 


00 


o 


OS 


OS 




CM 


US 


© 




«* 




Jz; 


-*"" Si „,*-«»-• 






























H 

S 

o 




t^ 


t* 


CO 


51 


OS 


CO 


OS 


-* 




o 


© 


© 


OO 




CM 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CM 


CO 


CM 


CO 


US 








































cm 


© 


00 


CO 


CM 


CO 


s 


t- 


l^ 


t-- 


CO 


s 


© 






3 

© 


t^ 




CM 


CO 


t^ 


■>* 


CO 


CM 


CO 


US 


a 


53 


© 


CM 

o 


US 


CO 


CO 


o 

CM 


CM 


CO 




00 

© 


US 


US 

CO 


lH 


u 


CO 


tH 


■* 


CO 


CO 


CM 


CO 


CO 


CM 


us 


CO 

1 


co 


(3 

o 


























































ft 


< 




CO 


C3 


CM 


o 


US 


«* 


s 


us 


§ 


© 


CO 


us 


CO 




K 






CO 


3 

CM 


OS 






t^ 






l>- 


© 




to 
1-1 


CO 
00 


^ 


o 

US 


CO 

5 


CM 

00 


CM 


-* 
«* 


lO 


CM 


z 


© 


CO 

© 


< 


*H 


M 


•>* 


■* 


■* 


CO 


CO 


<M 


CO 


CO 


CO 


■<* 


eo 








&> 




























For the 

Three 

Years 1913, 

1914 
and 1915 
































•"* 


CM 


CO 


© 


o 


CO 


OS 


OS 


CO 


t- 


CO 


00 


00 







CO 


© 


CO 
CM 


s 


o 

us 


£ 


3 


US 


OS 


° 


■«* 


s 




H 

H 

O 


CM* 


s 


00 


00 

US 


us* 

CM 


si 


cm" 

CO 


us 

CO 


OS 


OS 


CM 


<N 


US 




































OS 


CM 


© 




CM 


|2 


t^. 


OS 


oo 


US 


© 


eo 






us 

s 


s 


s 


£ 


00 
CO 


s 


CO 


s 


OS 


OS 
OS 


g§ 


§ 


ss 


© 




CO* 


CM 

o 


■^ 


00 

us 


CO 
CM 


CM 


CO 


U 


s 


© 

CM 


8 


eo* 


00* 

© 




& 




<M 
























us 




Se- 
































ts 

s 


































t» 




CO 


S3 


K 


| 


-* 


£ 


OS 
OS 


SB 


§ 


» 


© 

CM 




« 


«o 


CO 


CO 


US 


CM 


rt . 


o 


CO 


*"| 


us 


o 


00 


© 




>; 


o> 


CO 


CM* 


-*' 


cm' 


00* 


CM* 


«*" 


us" 


o 


00 




eo 


i 




*4 


*H 


o 


© 


1-H 


CO 


CM 


•* 


CO 


CO 


CM 




CO 












CM 


CO 


CM 


o 


CO 




CO 


s 


s 

us 


© 


«o 








-si 


CO 
© 


© 
(M 


00 
CO 


CO 

00 


OS 


§ 


O0 


OS 
CO 


© 


s 


© 






•M 


eo" 


92 


US* 


g 


oo" 


">: 


CO* 


■^t" 


o 


o - 


cm' 


■«JH 


•* 






CM 


© 


CM 


CM 


-* 


CO 


CO 


CM 




CO 




s 
























s 














02 














, 




3 














55 

O 










i 




8 


s 

3 

I 
1 


1 

1 

02 


s 

3 


s 

.2 










g 






"3 


1 


a 


O 


-3 


1 


1 














• 


■ft 

1 


1 


1 


«2 
1 


'1 

1- 


1 

CO 
M 

.s 

-3 


c3 

1 

ca 
"S 
CO 

1 


03 

3 

cj 
CO 
CD 

ts 

CO 


1 








i— t 


1 

02 


02 


01 

3 

02 
M 

3, 


1 

02 

G 
C3 

a 


■a 

3 


X, 
02 

3 


03 

1 


o 

■$ 

CO 
-3 

e 

c3 


W 

-S- 


02 

I 










T3 
O 
l— I 


-3 
CI 


i 


% 

M 


O 


3 


I 


s 

Ph 





106 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



o 

o 
O 



3 



CO 



hi 
H 







© **.«. 
































**" a> »h ■*» 




US 


i» 


o 






g 


■* 


o 


CO 














CO 


CO 




CO 


cr> 


CO 


CO 




t^ 


>o 










Six j-thW 




o 


t^ 


o 


Tft 


o 




eo 


CO 




CO 








1 


o 
CO 






















1 


1 




o 
































<! 






























H 
































































^ 




,— 1 


■* 


us 


© 


OS 


TH 


CO 


CO 


^H 


CO 


CO 










CO 


CO 


t^ 


!>• 


CO 


CS 


CO 


OS 


CS 


t^ 


t- 








U 


in 


«-l 


© 


-<*l 


o 


"* 


o 


»H 








1—1 








K 


© 






















' 


' 




H 


1-4 


CO 




























ft 
































*H 
































t-3 
































M 
































H 




co 


CO 


CO 


eo 


CO 


eo 


CO 


** 


t^ 


CO 














CO 


CO 

o 


o 

US 


§ 


9 


3 


CO 


CO 


CO 


t- 


j3 








S 






























For the 

Three 

Years 1913, 

1914 
and 1915 


CO 

eo 


s 


3 


s 


IC 


g 


§ 




CO 


o 


ss 




1 




ft 

s 
8 


CO 

CO 


CO 


CO 


1—1 


CO 


CO 


eo 


1—1 
CO 


o 
us 


CS 


1 


US 

CO 




CS 

CO 


t~ 


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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



107 



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108 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 109 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS. 

In compliance with the provisions of chapter 46, section 2, of 
the Revised Laws, 1 the Board's officers have visited each of the 
five county training schools and submit the following report. 
The schools are: — 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence. 
Hampden County Training School, Springfield. 
Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford. 
Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School, Walpole. 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston). 

Each school has been inspected. The accompanying table 
shows the numbers and movement of population in these five 
schools during the fiscal year ending November 30, 1916, and 
also the average weekly per capita cost of maintenance of each 
institution during that time. 

As will be seen from the table, there were 516 children in the 
five schools during 1916. The year opened with 379 boys. 
During the succeeding twelve months 166 boys and 4 girls were 
admitted and 165 boys were discharged or paroled, leaving 384 
on December 31, 1916, 2 when the year closed. 

The average age at time of admission was twelve years, seven 
and one-half months. The law raising the school age to sixteen 
years, which went into effect in September, 1913, and affects 
almost without qualification the class from which these children 
are drawn, has not tended to increase the number of committals 
of older boys. The average weekly per capita cost of maintain- 
ing the schools was $4.95, as compared with $4.71 last year. 

1 "County truant schools shall be subject to visitation by the board of education and by the 
state board of charity and said boards shall report thereon annually to the general court." 

2 See Table I. 



110 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. Ill 

There is no appreciable change to report in the admissions, 
either as to the nature of the cases or as to numbers, save that 
the total number admitted is less than last year by 21, and that 
the courts in the Essex district, taking advantage of the ena- 
bling act of 1913, have reverted to the once abandoned practice 
of committing girls to the county schools. There are four girls 
now at the Essex school. 

The original law passed in 1873 provided that "a child be- 
tween seven and fourteen years of age who wilfully and ha- 
bitually absents himself from school . . . may, if a boy, be 
committed to a county truant school, . . . and, if a girl, to the 
State Industrial School for girls, unless such child is placed on 
probation. ..." 

This provision remained in force until 1906. In 1903, how- 
ever, a qualification was added to the effect that if a girl was 
under twelve years of age she might be committed to the State 
Board of Charity. 

This distinction between the sexes in the disposition of cases 
was abrogated by the superseding statute of 1906 (chapter 389), 
which provided that "habitual truants, habitual absentees and 
habitual school offenders shall be committed to truant schools, 
however named, for the instruction and training of children, 
and now provided for by the several counties, and not to any 
other institution or place." 

Nor was this blanket provision disturbed in the final expres- 
sion of the law, contained in Acts of 1913, chapter 779, so that 
for the training schools generally it has been possible since 1906 
to receive and retain custody of girls. An exception appears in 
the case of the Suffolk School. In 1906 no girls were received 
at this institution, but preparation was made during that year 
for such cases by the fitting up of an old farmhouse. In 1907 
there were 6 girls. In 1908 this number increased to 7 and in 
1910 it reached 10. In 1911, by the passage of chapter 202 of 
the Acts of that year, it was provided that "habitual female 
truants, female absentees and habitual female school offenders, 
committed in the city of Boston shall be committed to the 
charge and custody of the Children's Institutions Trustees to be 
by them cared for in the same manner as neglected children." 

Thus ended the Boston experience. No girls had been re- 



112 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

ceived at the other schools in the interval, so that the reception 
and care of girls was begun and ended in the old farmhouse at 
West Roxbury. 

The law of 1913, possibly through inadvertence, took no ac- 
count of this chapter in truant school experience. It re- 
enacted the authority of 1906, so that as the law stands to-day 
female truants may be sent to the county schools, which are 
built and arranged in every detail for the care of boys. 

The four girls now at Essex live on the third floor of the ad- 
ministration house in the same building with, but completely 
separated from, the older boys. Their dormitory is fitted to 
accommodate a maximum of 20. Two of the girls are sisters, 
who also have two brothers in the school. In view of the ex- 
cellence of the management of this institution, kindly super- 
vision is guaranteed for these inmates, but this is probably all 
that can be expected, since the run of the school belongs to the 
boys, and a lapse from complete segregation would be unwar- 
ranted; moreover, there is nothing in the equipment that can 
give them a wholesome, well-balanced institutional life. Quite 
clearly the county training school is not a proper place for the 
care and custody of girls. The statute as it stood from 1873 to 
1906, denying the power of commitment, was in the public 
interest. The reversion of 1913 is a mistake. 

For many years the State Board of Charity has called atten- 
tion to the fact that the children in the county training schools 
are delinquents in truth and truants only by occasion. Truancy 
is an offence to be dealt with by the public school authorities 
with the aid of the probation system. With the development of 
probation in our courts — the number of cases placed on proba- 
tion has increased 34 per cent in the past seven years — the 
need for institutional correction of truancy as such has been 
passing away. This is amply demonstrated by the experience 
of Boston. In 1913 the Suffolk School at West Roxbury was 
closed and the cases cared for through a system of disciplinary 
day schools, the boys living in their own homes. As a result, 
truancy, in so far as it constituted a problem, has been solved 
for that district without the need of institutional care and all 
the disadvantages of sequestration of the child and the expen- 
sive operation of a costly plant. The cases of confirmed delin- 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



113 



quency have continued true to form, and have been cared for 
through probation and through commitment to the Rainsford 
Island and Lyman schools for delinquent boys. 

The process which marked the decline and effected the elim- 
ination of the Suffolk School has been operating with no less 
certainty in the case of the other truant schools. Thus the 
development of a highly efficient probation service for the 
Cambridge courts has reduced the number of commitments 
from that city to the Middlesex School from 31 in 1906 to none 
in 1916. Considering the schools as a group, there were 643 
inmates on December 1, 1907. In 1908, 500 were admitted and 
430 were discharged, leaving 713 children in residence Novem- 
ber 30, 1908. These totals gradually declined in the succeeding 
years, until in 1916 the number of inmates at the opening of 
the. year was 379, the number admitted, 170, the releases, 165, 
and the population on December 31, 1916, 384. The decline 
has been close to 50 per cent, as appears from the following 
tabulation : — 

Movement of Population in Training Schools, Ten Years. 





Beginning 
of Year 


Admitted 


Released 


Remaining 


1907 

1908 - 

1909 

1910 . . . . . . ' . 

1911 

1912 

1913 ....... 

1914 

1915 . . . 


643 
713 
672 
665 
642 
591 
599 
456 
381 


500 
377 
369 
319 
265 
260 
249 
166 
191 


430 
418 
384 
342 
313 
252 
392 
241 
193 


713 

672 

665 

642 

591 

599 

456i 

381 

379 



1 Suffolk School closed this year. 



In this same period of time the number of minors under six- 
teen who have been placed on probation throughout the Com- 
monwealth has increased about 34 per cent. In 1909, the first 
year of the Probation Commission, the number of such cases 
placed on probation was 2,278. In 1916 it was 3,053. Of the 



114 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

figures for 1916 it is worthy of note that about 37 per cent of 
all convictions were for larceny. 

In so far as the incomplete records kept in the truant schools 
reveal the history of the inmates, the causes alleged for delin- 
quencies other than truancy differ little from those in the pro- 
bation records or in the records at Lyman School. The most 
frequent offence is larceny. 

Detailed examination of the administration of the five schools 
reveals constant and conscientious effort on the part of super- 
intendents and their assistants. They are struggling with a 
system which lacks some of the elements of progress. Thus, 
with the exception of the Middlesex School, there is nowhere 
provided the machinery for studying the home conditions of 
each boy. Consequently nothing is known of the lad's likeli- 
hood, his previous environment, his reaction to surroundings. 
He reaches the school with little save his mittimus. He con- 
tinues there subject to the will of the county commissioners, 
and leaves the school, after earning sufficient merits or upon the 
superintendent's recommendation, to go into home conditions 
which to the authorities are unknown. There is nothing con- 
nected with any of the schools, save that at North Chelmsford, 
which can be called a parole system. With no pre-institution 
knowledge of the boy, and with no opportunity to reach out 
after him and help him after his time is served, the best the 
school can offer him is kind treatment and a modicum of school- 
ing. The immediate need, if these schools are to continue as a 
part of the machinery for dealing with juvenile delinquency, is 
a close interrelationship of the institution with the court and 
the probation service, and the speedy development of a parole 
service that will help the child to retain some of the values 
gained while at the institution. 

SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUP- 
PORTED BY CITIES AND TOWNS. 

The City and Town Paupers. 

The law provides that the State Board of Charity may visit 

and inspect all places where city or town poor are supported in 

families, and requires the Board to visit, at least once a year, 

not only all children who are maintained by the Common- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 115 

wealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense 
of any city or town. Children illegally retained in city or town 
almshouses — i.e., pauper children over two years of age, or, if 
the mothers are inmates, oyer three years of age, and not defec- 
tive in body or mind, who have been retained in an almshouse 
for more than two months — must be removed therefrom and 
placed at board at the expense of the city or town concerned. 
(Revised Laws, chapter 81, sections 3-7, 43; Acts of 1905, 
chapters 285, 303; Acts of 1913, chapter 112). 

The following data show numbers and location of the various 
classes of persons coming within the scope of this statute: — 

The Settled Adult Poor provided for in Families. 
Of the 365 adult poor persons reported by the local authori- 
ties as fully supported in families on January 1, 1916, 19 were 
unknown, 38 had died, and 9 had been removed before Visits 
could be made. The remaining 299 — 137 men and 162 women 
— were all visited and reported on by the Board's agents. 
They were supported by 127 cities and towns, as follows: 
Abington, 1; Acushnet, 1; Agawam, 2; Amesbury, 1; Ashland, 
2; Athol, 3; Barre, 1; Becket, 2; Berkley, 1; Berlin, 1; 
Bernardston, 3; Blandford, 1; Bolton, 1; Boxford, 1; Boyl-. 
ston, 1; Brewster, 6; Brookline, 1; Buckland, 1; Burlington, 
1; Charlemont, 1; Charlton, 1; Chatham, 2; Chelsea, 10; 
Cheshire, 2; Chester, 1; Clarksburg, 2; Cohasset, 1; Colrain, 
3; Cummington, 2; Dalton, 3; Danvers, 8; Dighton, 4; 
Dover, 1; Dracut, 2; Dudley, 3; East Longmeadow, 1; Ed- 
gartown, 5; Everett, 13; Fitchburg, 2; Freetown, 1; Gardner, 
2; Grafton, 1; Great Barrington, 4; Hard wick, 3; Harwich, 1; 
Hatfield, 1; Hawley, 1; Heath, 1; Hinsdale, 2; Holbrook, 5; 
Holden, 1; Hopedale, 2; Hull, 2; Huntington, 1; Ipswich, 3; 
Kingston, 1; Lakeville, 3; Lawrence, 5; Lee, 4; Lenox, 4; 
Ludlow, 3; Mansfield, 1; Marion, 1; Marlborough, 1; Marsh- 
field, 3; Mashpee, 1; Medway, 2; Melrose, 1; Mendon, 2; 
Merrimac, 4; Millbury, 2; Milton, 1; Monterey, 1; Mont- 
gomery, 1; Needham, 4; New Marlborough, 1; New Salem, 2; 
Newton, 4; Norfolk, 1; North Attleborough, 2; Northborough, 
2; North Brookfield, 1; Norton, 1; Norwood, 8; Oak Bluffs, 
2; Orange, 2; Orleans, 2; Otis, 3; Petersham, 3; Pittsfield, 1; 



116 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Plain ville, 1; Plympton, 1; Prescott, 2; Princeton, 1; Ran- 
dolph, 1; Revere, 10; Rochester, 1; Rockland, 4; Rowe, 1; 
Rowley, 1; Royalston, 3; Russell, 1; Salem, 2; Sandisfield, 3; 
Savoy, 1; Sheffield, 4; Shirley, 2; Southbridge, 3; South wick, 
3; Stoughton, 1 ; Topsfield, 1; Truro, 1; Washington, 1; 
Watertown, 1; Webster, 6; Wellesley, 1; Wellfleet, 1; Wen- 
ham, 1; West Boylston, 1; West Springfield, 2; West Stock- 
bridge, 4; West Tisbury, 2; Whitman, 11; Wilbraham, 1; 
Williamstown, 2; Winthrop, 3; Yarmouth, 5. 

Their ages were as follows: 4 between twenty-one and thirty; 
11 between thirty and forty; 25 between forty and fifty; 40 
between fifty and sixty; 71 between sixty and seventy; 94 be- 
tween seventy and eighty; 46 between eighty and ninety; 5 
between ninety and one hundred; and 3 whose age was un- 
known. For their support there was paid in 24 cases less than 
$2 per week; in 62 cases, from S2 to S3 per week; in 100 cases, 
from S3 to S4 per week; and in 113 cases — mostly of old and 
feeble persons — the rate varied from S4 to $12, according to 
the amount of care required. Of the whole number, 86 per cent 
were reported to be in fairly good or good physical condition, 
and 91 per cent in good mental condition. In all but 3 cases, or 
1 per cent, they were apparently receiving good care. There 
were 110 able to do light work, either in the house or about the 
premises. There were 36 supported in their own homes. In 
122 cases, according to the reports, the overseers of the poor 
complied with the law requiring them to visit the paupers at 
least once in every six months; in 32 cases they made one visit 
a year; in 31 cases the record of visits was uncertain; and in 
the remaining 114 cases no evidence of visits was found. 

Dependent Minok Children with Settlement, provided 
for in Almshouses. 
Visits were made in the cases of 98 children — 51 boys and 
47 girls — reported to be cared for by the following cities and 
towns in their almshouses: Andover, 1; Boston, 32; Brookline, 
1; Chicopee, 1; Fall River, 13; Harwich, 1; Holyoke, 1; 
Lancaster, 3; Lawrence, 3; Leominster, 1; Lowell, 7; Lynn, 
3; Maiden, 3; Melrose, 2; Methuen, 2; New Bedford, 8; 
Newton, 1; Norwell, 1; Quincy, 3; Salem, 3; Springfield, 6; 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 117 

Winchendon, 2. In addition to this number, 113 had been re- 
moved from the almshouse before the time of visitation. Of 
the number visited, 26 were so defective in mind or body as to 
render their retention in the almshouse desirable. There were 
7 who attended school. 

Dependent Minor Children with Settlement provided 
for outside of almshouses. 
As shown by the Board's visitation, of the 1,333 children 
reported by the local authorities as fully supported outside of 
almshouses on January 1, 1916, and on July 1, 1916, 37 were 
unknown, 1 had died and 144 had been removed before visits 
could be made. The remaining 1,151 — 594 boys and 557 girls 
— were supported' by 105 cities and towns, as follows: Abing- 
ton, 4; Athol, 4; Attleboro, 6; Avon, 1; Barnstable, 4; 
Becket, 9; Bedford, 6; Belchertown, 5; Blandford, 3; Boston, 
668; Brewster, 1; Brockton, 1: Brookfield, 1; Brookline, 4; 
Buckland, 5; Cambridge, 23; Chelsea, 17; Chicopee, 2; Clin- 
ton, 1; Cohasset, 5; Conway, 2; Dalton, 3; Dan vers, 1; 
Dartmouth, 6; Douglas, 4; Dover, 5; Dudley, 2; Easthamp- 
ton, 1; Easton, 4; Fitchburg, 1; Framingham, 3; Gardner, 4; 
Grafton, 5; Great Barrington, 7; Hamilton, 2; Hanover, 1; 
Hardwick, 2; Hinsdale, 3; Hull, 1; Kingston, 4; Lancaster, 1; 
Lawrence, 25; Lenox, 14; Leominster, 5; Littleton, 2; Lowell, 
18; Lynn, 14; Maiden, 2; Mansfield, 13; Marblehead, 1; 
Marion, 3; Marlborough, 1: Medford, 3; Medway, 7; Merri- 
mac, 1; Milford, 1; Millbury, 2; Milton, 5; Nantucket, 1; 
Natick, 7; New Bedford, 13; Newburyport, 1; New Salem, 1; 
Newton, 6; North Andover, 1; North Attleborough, 2; North 
Brookfield, 4; North Reading, 1; Norton, 1; Norwell, 3; 
Norwood, 39; Oxford, 5; Peabody, 2; Pelham, 2; Pembroke, 
1; Quincy, 4; Rockland, 1; Royalston, 4; Russell, 1; Salem, 
10; Saugus, 9; Shutesbury, 2; Somerville, 10; Southbridge, 9; 
Stoneham, 1; St ought on, 5; Topsfield, 1; Wakefield, 5; Wal- 
tham, 9; Wareham, 13; Warren, 1; Watertown, 1; Wayland, 
2; Webster, 1; Wellesley, 2; Wellfleet, 4; Westborough, 1; 
West Boylston, 1; Westford, 1; West Springfield, 2; Whit- 
man, 4; Winchendon, 1; Winchester, 1; Woburn, 3; Worces- 
ter, 3. 



118 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Of the whole number, 92 were cared for and treated in public 
and private hospitals and asylums. There were 778 who at- 
tended school, and 335 who did more or less work. Of the 
whole number, 1,134 were in fairly good physical condition, and 
1,027 in fairly good mental condition. The price of board 
varied from less than SI per week to $4 per week. These 
children were found to be well cared for with a few exceptions 
which have been brought to the attention of the local overseers. 

The Penalty incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for 
Failure to make their Pauper Returns during the 
Month of April, 1916. 
Sections 39-42 of chapter 81 of the Revised Laws, as amended 

by chapter 115 of the Acts of 1905, are as follows: — 

Section 39. Overseers of the poor shall keep full and accu- 
rate records, in a form prescribed by the state board of charity, 
of the paupers fully supported, the persons relieved and partially 
supported, and the travellers and vagrants lodged at the expense 
of their cities and towns and of the amount paid for such sup- 
port and relief. 

Section 40. They shall annually in April, for the year ending 
on the last day of March, return to the state board of charity 
the number of such persons supported and relieved, the cost 
thereof, and a record of those fully supported. 

Section 41. In the year nineteen hundred and five and in 
every tenth year thereafter the return of the overseers of the 
poor shall contain true and correct answers to such additional 
inquiries as the state board of charity may deem it advisable 
to make. 

Section 42. If the overseers of the poor of a city or town 
refuse or neglect to comply with the requirements of the three 
preceding sections, such city or town shall forfeit one dollar for 
each day's neglect, and the amount of such forfeiture shall be 
deducted from any amount to which said city or town may be 
entitled in reimbursement for relief of state paupers as provided 
in sections fifteen and sixteen of chapter eighty-five; and if no 
such reimbursement shall be due to said city or town, the for- 
feiture shall be deducted from any money which may be due 
to it from the commonwealth. 

Under these laws the Board reported to the Treasurer of the 
Commonwealth the names of the cities and towns that failed to 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 119 

make their pauper returns during the month of April, 1916, 
together with the amount of penalty incurred in each instance, 
as follows: Acushnet, $8; Adams, $193; Alford, $5; Ashland, 
$1; Avon, $11; Belchertown, $8; Blandford, $7; Bolton, $12; 
Boston, $3; Bourne, $4; Brookfield, $8; Buckland, $7; 
Charlemont, $7; Chatham, $4; Cheshire, $21; Chester, $2; 
Chilmark, $7; Colrain, $9; Conway, $4; Cummington, $5; 
Dana, $2: East Longmeadow, $7; Eastham, $3; Egremont, 
$16; Florida, $18; Gill, $4; Goshen, $2; Granby, $54; Great 
Barrington, $1; Hadley, $8; Hardwick, $16; Harvard, $10; 
Harwich, $8; Hinsdale, $9; Holyoke, $1; Lakeville, $5; 
Lanesborough, $1; Lee, $1; Lenox, $8; Leverett, $122; Ley- 
den, $1; Lincoln, $14; Littleton, $36; Lynnfield, $3; Mans- 
field, $4; Maynard, $2; Medfield, $16; Merrimac, $1; Mon- 
roe, $18; New Bedford, $21; New Braintree, $7; Norfolk, $3; 
Otis, $8; Paxton, $7; Peru, $2; Phillipston, $1; Plainfield, $5; 
Rowley, $7; Rutland, $1; Sandwich, $7; Shelburne, $4; 
Southampton, $5; Southbridge, $115; South wick, $4; Stough- 
ton, $7; Sunderland, $8; Topsfield, $4; Truro, $4; Tyngs- 
borough, $5; Wakefield, $12; Warwick, $1; Wayland, $7, 
West Springfield, $2; Weymouth, $1; Whately, $23; total, 
$988. - 

SUPERVISION OF MOTHERS' AID. 

Under the provisions of section 5, chapter 763, Acts of 1913, 
the State Board of Charity is required in its annual report to 
the Legislature to make: (a) a report on the work done by its 
own agents and by the overseers of the poor in respect to such 
families, any of whose members are without legal settlement in 
the Commonwealth; and (b) a separate report on the work 
done by the overseers in respect to such families all of whose 
members have a legal settlement in the Commonwealth. The 
text of the law is as follows: — 

Acts of 1913, Chapter 763. 

An Act to provide for suitably aiding mothers with de- 
pendent CHILDREN. 
Section 1. In every city and town the overseers of the poor 
shall, subject to the provisions of the subsequent sections of this 
act, aid all mothers with dependent children under fourteen years 



120 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

of age, if such mothers are fit to bring up their children. The 
aid furnished shall be sufficient to enable the mothers to bring 
up their children properly in their own homes; and such mothers 
and their children shall not be deemed to be paupers by reason 
of receiving aid as aforesaid. 

Section 2. Before aiding any mother under the foregoing 
section, except as hereinafter provided, the overseers of the poor 
shall determine that the mother is fit to bring up her children 
and that the other members of the household and the surround- 
ings of the home are such as to make for good character, and 
that aid from the overseers is necessary to enable her to bring 
up her children properly, by making an immediate and careful 
inquiry including the resources of the family and the ability of 
its other members, if any, to work or otherwise contribute to its 
support, the existence of relatives able to assist the family, and of 
individuals, societies or agencies who may be interested therein; 
shall take all lawful means to compel all persons bound to sup- 
port the mother and children to support them, and to enforce 
any other legal rights for their benefit; shall press all members 
of the family who are able to work, other than the mother and 
her dependent children, to secure work; shall try to secure work 
for them; and shall secure all necessary aid for the mother and 
children which can be secured from relatives, organizations or 
individuals. Nothing herein contained shall be construed to 
prevent the overseers from giving prompt and suitable temporary 
aid hereunder, pending compliance with the requirements of this 
section, when in their opinion such aid is necessary and cannot 
be obtained from other sources. A detailed statement of ex- 
penses incurred under this section shall be rendered to the state 
board of charity, together with such certificates or other guar- 
antees as the said board may require. 

Section 3. The said overseers, either by one of their own 
number or by their duly appointed agent, shall visit at least 
once in every three months at their homes or other place or 
places where they may be living, each mother and her dependent 
children who are being aided financially or otherwise by said 
overseers, and after each visit shall make and keep on file as a 
part of their official records a detailed statement of the condition 
of the home and family and all other data which may assist in 
determining the wisdom of the measures taken and the advisa- 
bility of their continuance; and said overseers shall at least once 
in each year reconsider the case of each mother with dependent 
children with whom they are dealing, and enter their determina- 
tion with the reason therefor on their official records. 

Section 4. This act shall apply to all mothers and their 
dependent children, whether or not they or any of them may 
have a settlement within the commonwealth, who shall have 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 121 

resided in the commonwealth not less than three years. No 
person shall acquire a settlement or be in process of acquiring a 
settlement while receiving aid hereunder. 

Section 5. The state board of charity shall hereafter super- 
vise the work done and measures taken by the overseers of the 
poor of the several cities and towns in respect to families in 
which there is one child or more under the age of fourteen, 
whether or not such family or any member thereof has a settle- 
ment within the commonwealth; and for this purpose may es- 
tablish such rules relative to notice as they deem necessary and 
may visit and inspect any or all families aided under this act, 
and shall have access to any records and other data kept by the 
overseers of the poor or their representatives relating to such 
aid; and said board shall, in its annual report to the legislature, 
report upon the work done by its own agents and by the over- 
seers of the poor in respect to such families any of whose mem- 
bers are without legal settlement in the commonwealth; and 
shall make a separate report on the work done by the overseers 
of the poor in respect to such families in which a<ll the members 
have a legal settlement in the commonwealth. 

Section 6. In respect to all mothers in receipt of aid here- 
under the city or town rendering the aid shall be reimbursed by 
the commonwealth, after approval of the bills by the state board 
of charity, for one third of the amount of the aid given. If the 
mother so aided has no settlement, the city or town shall be 
reimbursed for the total amount of the aid given after approval 
of the bills by the state board of charity as aforesaid. If the 
mother so aided has a lawful settlement in another city or town 
two thirds of the amount of such aid given may be recovered in 
an action of contract against the city or town liable therefor in 
accordance with the provisions of chapter eighty-one of the 
Revised Laws and acts in amendment thereof and in addition 
thereto. 

Section 7. For the purpose of reimbursing the cities and 
towns, as provided in the foregoing section, there shall be appro- 
priated from the treasury of the commonwealth the sum of 
fifty thousand dollars for the operations of the first year. 

Section 8. All acts and parts of acts inconsistent herewith 
are hereby repealed. 

Section 9. This act shall take effect on the first day of 
September, nineteen hundred and thirteen. [Approved June 
12, 1918. 

In accordance with the foregoing requirements the following 
report for the year December 1, 1915, to November 30, 1916, 
is submitted. 



122 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

From the tabulation on pages 123 and 125 it appears that 
since September 1, 1913, the date when the law went into effect, 
notices of claims for reimbursement by cities and towns have 
reached the State Board of Charity involving a total of 5,311 
mothers with 16,514 dependent children under fourteen years of 
age. Twelve per cent of the whole number were without legal 
settlement in the Commonwealth. Hence, eighty-eight per cent 
of the whole number had legal settlement and would not there- 
fore be the subjects of relief from the State treasury except for 
the mothers' aid law. As settled persons they were chargeable 
to the local communities, the State treasury reimbursing one- 
third the cost instead of paying all as in unsettled cases. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. | 



123 



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124 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 125 



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126 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The tabulation shows a decrease of about one-fourth in the 
number of applicants from the total of 1915 and a drop of one- 
third from the total of 1914. Aside, therefore, from the inflr - 
ence of skill and experience in administration there appear I*' 
be other forces now operating to cause a positive and steady 
decline in the number of families coming to public support 
under this law. To summarize the totals for 1916, a total of 
1,092 notices were received claiming reimbursement for aid 
given to 1,092 mothers with a total of 3,422 dependent children 
under fourteen years of age. Seven hundred forty-eight of these 
mothers were widows, and 936 of them had legal settlements. 
The unsettled cases comprised 97 widows (62 per cent) with 
278 children, and 59 whose husbands were living and who had 
186 children. The number of widows among the settled appli- 
cants was 651, or 70 per cent. 

Last year the Board published a list of the cities and towns 
from which notices were received, the purpose being to show the 
geographical distribution of local authorities who have made use 
of the statute. A similar list for the last fiscal year is appended. 
It shows that though the number of applications has fallen off 
one-fourth since 1915, the number of cities and towns making 
use of the statute has increased from 165 in 1915 to 192 in 
1916. The list further shows the number of active cases in 
each locality at the close of the year. 

A further point of interest in the local aspect of mothers' aid 
is the relative use made of the authority by the larger com- 
munities. To show this, the list on page 129 is arranged to 
show all the cities of the Commonwealth with the census of each 
and the number of cases active at the close of the year. 



Cities and Towns rendering Mothers' Aid. Number of Cases active November 

80, 1916. 



City or Town 


Cases 


City or Town 


Cases 


Abington 

Acton 

Agawam 

Amesbury 

Andover 


2 
1 
2 
3 
3 


Arlington 

Ashland 

Athol . . . 

Attleboro 

Avon 


9 
2 

2 

2 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



127 



Cities and Towns rendering Mothers' Aid. Number of Cases active November 
80, 1916 — Continued. 



City ok Town 


Cases 


City or Town 


Cases 


Barnstable . . . . ■ . 


4 


Erving 


1 


Barre 








1 


Everett . 








51 


Bellingham . 








1 


Fairhaven 








1 


Belmont 








1 


Fall River 








58 


Berlin . 








1 


Falmouth 








3 


Beverly . 








19 


Fitchburg 








16 


Billerica 








' 4 


Foxborough . 








1 


Blackstone 








1 


Framingham . 








12 


Boston . 








1,065 


Franklin 








4 


Bourne . 








1 


Freetown 








1 


Boylston 








2 


Gardner 








4 


Braintree 








6 


Georgetown . 








1 


Bridgewater . 








2 


Gloucester 








24 


Brockton 








40 


Grafton . 








2 


Brookline 








27 


Great Barrington 








6 


Burlington 




; 




1 


Greenfield 








3 


Cambridge 








132 


Groveland 








1 


Charlemont . 








2 


Hadley . 








1 


Chelmsford . 








2 


Hamilton 








2 


Chelsea . 








57 


Hampden 








1 


Chicopee 








14 


Hanover 








2 


Clinton . 








3 


Haverhill 








15 


Cohasset . - 








1 


Hingham 








4 


Concord 








8 


Holbrook 








1 


Dalton . 








1 


Holden . 








1 


Danvers 








11 


Holliston 








3 


Dartmouth . 








1 


Holyoke 








43 


Dedham 








12 


Hopedale 








2 


Deerfield 








1 


Hopkinton 








1 


Douglas 








2 


Hudson . 








1 


Dracut . 








4 


Hull 








1 


Dudley . 








1 


Ipswich . 








8 


East Bridgewater 








1 


Lawrence 








58 


Eastham 








1 


Lee 








2 


Easthampton 
Easton . 
Edgartown . . . 








2 

7 

1 


Leicester 
Leominster . 
Lexington 








3 
9 

7 



128 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Cities and Towns rendering Mothers' Aid. Number of Cases active November 
80, 1916 — Continued. 



City or Town 


Cases 


City or Town 


Cases 


Lincoln 


1 


Norwood . ... 


2 


Lowell . 








109 


Orange . 










2 


Ludlow . 








2 


Oxford . 










1 


Lynn • . 








52 


Palmer . 










5 


Maiden . 








48 


Peabody 










21 


Mansfield 








2 


Pepperell 










1 


Marblehead . 








9 


Pittsfield 










6 


Marlborough . 








9 


Plainville 










1 


Marshfield 








2 


Plymouth 










9 


Mattapoisett . 








1 


Provincetown 










2 


Maynard 








5 


Quincy . 










30 


Medford 








20 


Randolph 










2 


Medway 








2 


Reading 










9 


Melrose . 








12 


Revere . 










18 


Merrimac 








2 


Rockland 










6 


Methuen 








11 


Rockport 










1 


Milford . 








20 


Rowley . 










3 


Milton . 








7 


Rutland 










1 


Monson . 








1 


Salem 










49 


Montague 








2 


Salisbury 










1 


Nahant . 








1 


Saugus . 










7 


Nantucket 








1 


Scituate 










4 


Natick . 








6 


Seekonk 










1 


Needham . 








3 


Sherbom 










2 


New Bedford 








115 


Shirley . 










2 


Newbury 








2 


Somerville 










57 


Newburyport 








4 


South Hadley 








2 


Newton . 








40 


Southborough 








3 


North Adams 








7 


Southbridge . 








14 


North Andover 








2 


Spencer . 










4 


North Attleborougl 


ti 






12 


Springfield 










63 


North Brookfield 








2 


Stockbridge 










2 


North Reading 








1 


Stoneham 










3 


Northampton 








14 


Stoughton 










1 


Northborough 








1 


Sturbridge 










1 


Northbridge . 








1 


Sunderland 










1 


Norton . 








3 


Swampscott 










1 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



129 



Cities and Towns rendering Mothers 1 Aid. Number of Cases active November 
30, 1916 — Concluded. 



City or Town 


Cases 


City or Town 


Cases 


Taunton 


32 


West Newbury .... 


1 


Templeton 










2 


West Springfield 








4 


Tewksbury . 










3 


Westborough . 








1 


Tyngsborough 










1 


Westfield 








4 


Upton . 










2 


Westford 








1 


Uxbridge 










1 


Westwood 








1 


Wakefield 










15 


Weymouth 








8 


Walpole . 










4 


Williamsburg 








4 


Waltham 










33 


Williamstown 








1 


Ware 










4 


Wilmington . 








1 


Wareham 










4 


Winchendon . 








3 


Warren . 










1 


Winchester 








5 


Watertown 










13 


Winthrop 








8 


Webster . 










12 


Woburn . 








18 


Wellesley 










8 


Worcester 








136 


West Bridgewater 










1 
1 


Wrentham 
Total 








1 


West Brookfield 


3,035 



Cities of Massachusetts. Population and Number of Cases active 
November 30, 1916. 



City 

Boston 

Worcester 

Fall River 

New Bedford .... 

Cambridge 

Lowell ..... 

Springfield 

Lynn 

Lawrence 

Somerville .... 

Brockton . . 

Holyoke 

Haverhill 



Population 


Active Cases 


745,439 


1,065 


162,697 


136 


124,791 


58 


109,568 


115 


108,822 


132 


107,978 


109 


102,971 


63 


95,803 


52 


90,259 


58 


86,854 


57 


62,288 


40 


60,816 


43 


49,450 


15 



130 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Cities of Massachusetts. Population and Number of Cases active 
November 80, 1916 — Concluded. 



City 

Maiden 

Chelsea 

Newton 

Quincy 

Fitchburg 

Pittsfield 

Everett 

Salem 

Taunton 

Medford 

Waltham 

Chicopee 

Revere . . . 
Gloucester .... 

Beverly 

North Adams .... 
Northampton ..... 

Attleboro 

Leominster . . 

Melrose 

Woburn 

Newburyport .... 
Marlborough .... 



Population Active Cases 



48,907 


48 


43,426 


57 


43,113 


40 


40,674 


30 


39,656 


16 


39,607 


6 


37,718 


51 


37,200 


49 


36,161 


32 


30,509 


20 


30,154 


33 


30,138 


14 


25,178 


18 


24,478 


24 


22,959 


19 


22,035 


7 


21,654 


14 


18,480 


11 


17,646 


9 


16,880 


12 


16,410 


18 


15,311 


4 


15,250 


9 



Causes of Dependency. 
Analysis of case histories in the 5,311 applications for 
mothers' aid indicates the immediate causes of the dependency 
behind the application to be, in order of importance, death of 
husband, 3,826, or 72 per cent; desertion, 699, or 13.2 per cent; 
tuberculosis in husband, 302, or 5.7 per cent; illness of husband, 
other than tuberculosis (totally incapacitating), 181, or 3.4 per 
cent; insanity of husband, 181, or 3.4 per cent; imprisonment 
of husband, 85, or 1.6 per cent; divorce or legal separation, 
37, or .7 per cent. 



Part. I J GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD 



131 



Though these percentages can in no sense be taken to estab- 
lish the relative importance of the causes of dependency apart 
from applications for mothers' aid, they are nevertheless of 
great importance in estimating the nature and scope of the 
problem at which this law is directed. 



Death 
7Z°/o 



\o 



.\> 



o- 



^ 



o\ 



T.B. 



5-7 % 






r M 



^e 



Divorce OT 



& 



*% 






That widowhood is present in nearly three-fourths of the 
cases is not remarkable, since the death or incapacity of the 
breadwinner, who in families of small children is almost invari- 
ably the father, is the chief cause for public dependency gener- 
ally. This 72 per cent of deaths added to the 12.5 per cent of 
physical or mental incapacity accounts for 84.5 per cent of all 
the cases. The startling fact in this last group of causes is that 
only a little less than half of all the cases of incapacity are due 
to tuberculosis. One in every seventeen cases that have applied 



132 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

for mothers' aid in Massachusetts has come to distress directly 
as a result of the ravages of that one disease. 

There is still another fact of vital importance to any con- 
structive social program, namely, the large number of deser- 
tions. Thirteen and one-half per cent of all the applicants 
were deserted wives, — one in every 8. In view of the known 
policy of the State Board restricting the extending of mothers' 
aid in desertion cases in certain particulars so that desertion 
shall not be encouraged, it is certain that desertion plays a large 
part in public dependency which the authorities under all our 
aid laws are called upon to relieve. 

It is of value to consider these important causes in detail. 

Death of the Husband. 

Seventy-two per cent of all the applicants for mothers' aid 
were widows. Most of the husbands died before they had 
reached middle age. A study of 500 cases shows the average 
age of father at time of death to be thirty-seven and a half 
years. 

A study of the cases of 300 widows whose husbands died since 
the mothers' aid law went into effect, September 1, 1913, 
showed that the cause of the husband's death was tuberculosis 
in 92 cases; pneumonia in 63; accident in 42; heart trouble in 
30; cancer in 29; Bright's disease in 18; typhoid fever in 11; 
appendicitis in 4; insanity in 4; diabetes in 3; blood poisoning 
in 2; and shock in 2. 

Thus tuberculosis was the cause of death in nearly one-third 
of all the cases, that disease and pneumonia together causing 
more than one-half of the total. Accident caused one-seventh. 

Many cases of tuberculosis were no doubt contracted in the 
course of the man's employment, and should therefore be classed 
as occupational diseases. Stonecutters, brassfinishers and men 
who work in the dusty rag rooms of paper mills were especially 
susceptible. Other occupational diseases were found, such as 
lead poisoning in the case of printers and painters. 

Many of the accidental deaths were industrial accidents. In 
some cases no workmen's compensation was obtainable; in 
others, mothers' aid supplemented an inadequate workmen's 
compensation allowance. This was especially true in cases 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 133 

where the victims of industrial accidents were unskilled laborers 
working for small pay. 

Intemperance undoubtedly was a contributing cause in many 
cases, although it was difficult to trace as a primary cause of 
death. 

Social legislation that protects the health and prolongs the 
life of the breadwinners of families, and education that increases 
their wage-earning capacity, securing to their families better 
living conditions and the possibility of providing for the future, 
should minimize dependency due to the untimely death of the 
fathers of such families. 

Tuberculosis. 

Tuberculosis is one of the greatest causes of dependency in 
our mothers' aid families. 

First — It is the cause of the death in nearly one-third of all 
the fathers who die and leave their families dependent. 

Second. — It is the cause of the illness that totally incapaci- 
tates one-fifth of all the living fathers of dependent families. 

Third. — It is the cause of inability to work and thereby con- 
tribute to the family support in the cases of hundreds of 
mothers of dependent children, as well as in the cases of hun- 
dreds of children of working age in these families. 

The chief danger from this disease lies in the fact that it is 
infectious. We find whole families afflicted with it. The 
father often is the original victim, and the mother, caring for 
the sick man, contracts the disease from him. The children 
born of such parents are often weaklings, and frequently become 
actively tubercular. 

The State Board of Charity recognizes this danger of con- 
tagion. It realizes the necessity of prompt and scientific treat- 
ment of tuberculosis in its early stages, together with effective 
preventive work in the interest of those who are predisposed to 
the disease as well as those who have been exposed to the 
danger of contracting it. The Board's regulation or policy, 
therefore, with reference to reimbursements for aid rendered to 
families in which tuberculosis is present requires that — 

Aid should not be granted to a mother if a member of the 
family has tuberculosis in a communicable stage unless such 



134 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

person shall apply for admission to a sanatorium, and shall 
agree, pending admission to the sanatorium, to conduct him- 
self in a manner prescribed by the local health authorities, and 
also unless the other members of the family have been examined 
for tuberculosis. 

Sanatorium care is insisted upon for those in the early stages 
of the disease, with the hope of restoring the patient to health 
and earning capacity; and it is urged for those in the advanced 
stage of the disease for the purpose of providing proper medical 
care for the patients, and also for the purpose of protecting the 
members of the patient's family and the community. 

The problem of caring for tubercular patients in their own 
homes is a problem in which local boards of health and private 
anti-tuberculosis societies play an important part. Such pa- 
tients are on the whole well supervised, but the fact remains 
that in some cases tubercular men are still allowed to take care 
of young children while the mother is away at work. These 
men are sometimes found by our visitor preparing food for the 
family. 

» 
Totally Incapacitating Illness of Husband {Other than 
Tuberculosis) . 

Blindness, chronic heart trouble, paralysis, a crippled condi- 
tion resulting from serious accident, and locomotor ataxia are 
totally incapacitating illnesses that prevented 181 husbands out 
of the total of 5,311 from supporting their dependent families. 
These men remain at home; thus the cost of their support and 
care must be included as a part of the family expenses. 

Sometimes they are able to earn a dollar or two; sometimes 
relatives contribute partly to their support. They are not 
institutional cases, and as members of the dependent family 
they must be provided for out of the mothers' aid allowance. 

Insanity of Husband. 
In 181 cases out of the 5,311 the insane husbands were cared 
for in State hospitals. The prognosis in these cases is generally 
poor. Occasionally an insane husband who has shown improve- 
ment is allowed to return to his family, but such men are sel- 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 135 

dom able to assume the support of the family, and frequently 
they are returned to the hospital after unsuccessful trial at 
home. 

Husband's Commitment to Jail. 
In 85 of the 5,311 cases the husband had been committed to 
jail for at least one year. Manslaughter, forgery, breaking and 
entering and larceny were the more serious crimes committed. 
On charges of non-support and desertion some of these men had 
been sentenced for more than a year. In these cases the de- 
pendent mother receives 50 cents a day for each day that the 
prisoner is employed at hard labor. 

Divorce or Legal Separation. 

In 37 cases the mother had secured a divorce or a legal 
separation from her husband. In all of these cases the mother 
had been adjudged the innocent party, and had been awarded 
the custody of her children. In most of them the father had 
been ordered by the court to contribute a specified sum per 
week towards the support of his family, but invariably the 
father had failed to carry out the order of the court and had 
disappeared. 

Desertion. 

Desertion is a primary cause of dependency. It was found in 
1 out of every 8 of all mothers' aid cases, and ranks second 
among the general causes of dependency. The attitude of the 
State Board of Charity on desertion is set forth in the following 
policy: — 

Aid should not be granted to a mother whose husband has. 
deserted his family unless a warrant for non-support has been 
issued under the provisions of chapter 456, Acts of 1911; until' 
one year has elapsed since the desertion occurred; and until 
every effort has been made to apprehend the deserting husband. 

It is important that the mothers' aid law should not be used 
to relieve deserting husbands of the responsibility of providing 
for their families. If a man wilfully neglects to provide for his 
wife and children without just cause, every effort should be 
made to apprehend him and compel him to face his responsi- 



136 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

bility. Even in the case of a man who decides to leave his wife 
for seemingly just cause, there is still the father's obligation to 
support his children. It is only fair to expect the deserted wife 
to compel her husband to live up to his obligations. Therefore, 
she is required to secure a warrant for his arrest before she is 
considered eligible for mothers' aid. 

Inasmuch as the law contemplates only that necessity which 
is likely to extend over a long period of time, temporary cases 
should not be classified as coming within the requirements of 
this statute. Temporary aid is available for temporary de- 
pendency, and it should be given in cases where desertion is the 
cause of temporary distress, and where some effort on the part 
of the family, with police aid, would result in compelling the 
husband to provide for his family. As a preventive measure, 
and also in order to allow time in which to locate the husband 
and force him to support, the lapse of one year since the 
desertion occurred is required. 

Definite and determined effort should be made to locate the 
deserter, and if necessary he should be brought before the court 
to answer to his neglect or failure to support his family. The 
uniform desertion act makes desertion a crime, and provides a 
fine or imprisonment or both as a punishment. Likewise the 
failure to support is a crime under this act, for which the 
husband can also be prosecuted. Both are indictable offences 
and may be brought to the attention of the district attorney. 
Proceedings under the uniform desertion act may be begun in 
the municipal, district or police court of the district in which 
the husband and wife, or either of them, are living, or in which 
they last lived together. 

If a deserting husband can be located within the State, prose- 
cution is comparatively easy, but unfortunately many of them 
leave one jurisdiction to seek refuge elsewhere. As each State 
is a sovereignty in and of itself it is more difficult to bring the 
fugitive back from a State of refuge, and it generally means 
extradition process. This is cumbersome and requires time. 
District attorneys, too, are loath to spend a great deal of money 
to extradite a fugitive unless they are confident of results. 

The cost of maintaining the deserter's family at public 
expense, however, is enormous as compared with the expense 
of extradition. Moreover, extradition if successful is a most 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 137 

valuable lesson to others likely to evade their family obliga- 
tions. 

Desertion cases must be scrutinized most carefully, and 
wherever it is possible to make the deserting husband support 
his family it should be done. Local overseers should be slow 
to aid these cases under the mothers' aid law until they are 
definitely satisfied that the deserter cannot be apprehended. 

Insurance on Life of Deceased Father. 

Interesting facts with reference to insurance come to light as 
a result of the special study of 300 cases above mentioned. 
Most of the deceased fathers of the dependent families receiving 
mothers' aid carried insurance which was paid to the widows 
immediately after the father's death. Of the 300 cases studied, 
in which the death of the father had occurred since the enact- 
ment of the mothers' aid law, the amounts paid to the widows 
were comparatively small. Two-thirds of the number received 
less than $500 apiece. The average amount was $345. 

In many cases the widows, unused to handling large sums of 
money, invested their money unwisely, so that it was not long 
available for the living expenses of the family. Frequently the 
widow had borrowed money from relatives which she had to 
return. Often these were debts of long standing which the 
widow felt obliged to pay. There was abundant proof that the 
greater part of the insurance money was spent for funeral ex- 
penses and for medical attendance during the father's last 
illness. 

One-third of these widows applied for mothers' aid within one 
month of the husband's death; two-thirds applied within three 
months; and all but six applied within six months. 

It is evident, therefore, the claim of the insurance interests to 
the contrary notwithstanding, that the insurance carried by the 
fathers of these 300 families did not prevent dependency to any 
appreciable degree. In most cases the insurance merely pro- 
vided for an elaborate funeral. 

Insurance on Living Members of Dependent Families. 

It was the exception rather than the rule to find a mothers' 
aid family that did not carry insurance in some form upon the 
lives of some of its members. Most of the families carried so- 



138 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



called industrial insurance, upon which the mother paid a 
premium of 5 or 10 cents each week upon the life of each child, 
and 25 cents upon her own life. 

Some of the families carried fraternal insurance upon the 
life of the mother or upon the life of the incapacitated father. 
Payments on these policies were made monthly with extra 
quarterly assessments. Some .families carried both industrial 
and fraternal insurance, and in some cases there were several 
policies on a single life. 

The life of the incapacitated father was found to be insured 
for $500 to $1,000 in many cases. The life of the mother was 
insured for a less amount. The insurance carried on the life 
of each child was found to be very small, usually little more 
than enough to cover funeral expenses in case of death, so that 
instead of life insurance it should more properly be termed 
burial insurance. 

The following tabulation of premium rates, and the num- 
ber of families found to be paying them, is the result 
of a study of 500 mothers' aid cases in which insurance 
appeared : — 



Insurance on Living Members of Mothers' Aid Families. 



Number op Cases 


Amount 
paid 


Number of Cases 


Amount 
paid 


1 . 

4 

1 . . . . . . 

8 ...... . 

1 

20 

4 

27 

1 

1 

1 

34 

6 

2 

31 


$0 05 
10 
13 
15 
19 
20 
23 
25 
26 
27 
29 
30 
33 
34 
35 


3 

3 

8 

3 . . . . . . . 

34 . . . . 

4 

1 

41 

3 

2 

1 

41 

4 

4 

1 


$0 36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
45 
46 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



139 



Insurance on Living Members of Mothers' Aid Families ■ — Concluded. 



Number of Cases 


Amount 
paid 


Number op Cases 


Amount 
paid 


8 ...... 

37 

1 

4 . . . . . . . 

21 

3 . 

2 

2 . . . . 

1 

14 

3 . . . . 

2 

5 ...... . 

15 

2 

3 

15 

2 

1 

5 

2 

1 


$0 54 
55 
56 
58 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
67 
68 
69 
70 
73 
74 
75 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 


1 

2 . 

7 

1 

10 

1 

6 

2 

1 . . . ■ . 

9 

1 .'.'.'. 

3 

1 . . . . , . . 

4 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 . . . 


$0 83 

84 

85 

86 

90 

93 

95 

96 

99 

1 00 

1 01 

1 04 

1 05 

1 08 

1 10 

1 11 

1 20 

1 23 

1 46 

1 50 

2 12 



Average amount per week per family, 54 cents. 



The average amount of premiums paid by each family, as 
appears from the foregoing tabulation, was 54 cents a week. 
The average amount of aid granted to these mothers was $5.64 
a week, so that 9 J cents out of every dollar of mothers' aid was 
spent for insurance. 

On November 30, 1916, there were 3,035 mothers' aid cases 
throughout the State. If each one of these families were in- 
sured at the premium rate of 54 cents a week it would cost 
$1,638.90 per week, or $85,222.80 per year, out of the State 
treasury to carry the burden. 

On November 30, 1916, there were 1,065 active mothers' 
aid cases in the city of Boston. If these families were insured 



140 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

at the rate of 54 cents a week it would cost $575.10 per week, 
or $29,905.20 per year, to insure them. 

It is estimated that in Boston during the last fiscal year 5 
mothers and 15 dependent children of the mothers' aid group 
died. Allowing burial expenses at the rate of $100 for each 
adult, and $50 for each dependent child, it would cost only 
$1,250 to bury those persons who actually died, as compared 
with the estimated cost of $29,905.20 for insuring at the average 
rate the lives of the families in Boston receiving mothers' aid. 
Clearly it would be economy to provide suitable burial rather 
than to pay large sums for insurance. 

The Board recently adopted the following policy: — 

Considering the allowance for burial expenses, aid should not 
be granted to a mother who is paying insurance upon the lives 
of her children or upon the lives of other relatives. 

The burial allowance referred to reads: — 

It is the desire of the State Board of Charity that the allow- 
ance for burial shall be wholly suitable. When the overseers are 
in doubt the State Board of Charity will be glad to advise. 

Each local board of overseers has the right to determine 
what the burial allowance in each case shall be, just as each 
local board now decides upon the amount of aid of any other 
kind. The Board's regulations with reference to insurance 
further reads: — 

Aid should not be granted to a mother who is paying insurance 
upon her own life or upon the life of her wholly incapacitated 
husband, if such policies can be converted into paid-up policies, 
or if they have a reasonable cash surrender value. 

If a mother has been paying insurance upon her own life for 
a number of years she may secure a paid-up policy upon which 
no further payments need be made, which furnishes her with 
ample protection for the remainder of her life at no further 
expense to her, and which in the event of her death provides 
a suitable burial with a balance for the use of her children in 
many cases. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 141 

^ If there is a cash surrender value obtainable the mother is 
expected to convert her policy into cash. Two hundred dollars 
of this sum she is permitted to keep as an emergency fund. 
If the sum exceeds $200, mothers' aid payments are suspended 
until the sum in excess of $200 is economically used for the 
living expenses of the family. 

If the mother has carried fraternal insurance upon her life 
which has no cash surrender value and which cannot be con- 
verted into a paid-up policy she is often able to arrange to have 
the fraternal order carry her policy for her. In case of the 
death of the insured the total amount of premiums paid by 
the fraternal order may then be deducted from the face of the 
policy. Often a relative, not otherwise able to assist the fam- 
ily, is willing to assume payment of the premiums. 

In the case of a mother who is paying insurance upon the 
life of her wholly incapacitated husband similar arrangements 
can be made, although in some few cases, wliere neither fra- 
ternal order nor relative will agree to continue payments, it 
may be advisable for the mother to continue to pay the 
premiums. 

In every case a reasonable length of time should be granted 
within which the mother may be able to make equitable and 
satisfactory adjustment of her insurance claims. 

Insurance is a private investment or a method of saving. 
Public funds appropriated for relief purposes should not be 
used for private investment or saving, but rather for such 
necessities of life as rent, food, fuel and clothing. 

State Outlays for Mothers' Aid. 
The Legislature of 1916 appropriated $300,000 for the pur- 
pose of reimbursing cities and towns as provided in the law. 
This sum was expended, and on November 30, 1916, there were 
bills outstanding to the amount of $92,500. Adding the above 
figures to amounts previously appropriated and paid out, it 
appears that the total appropriated from the State treasury 
down to the present time has been $729,000, while the total 
amount of claims by cities and towns received and paid by the 
State has been $726,069.55. There remain still unpaid claims 
as above shown amounting to $92,500. 



142 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SUPERVISION OF WAYFARERS' LODGES AND PUBLIC 
LODGING HOUSES. 

Acts of 1914, chapter 606, places upon the Board the duty 
of annual inspection of all wayfarers' lodges and public lodging 
houses, whose charges are 25 cents or less for each person per 
day. The text of the act is as follows: — 

Chapter 606, Acts of 1914. 

An Act to establish state supervision of wayfarers' 
lodges and public lodging houses. 

Section 1. Every building, lodge, enclosure or establishment 
in which wayfarers, tramps, wanderers, needy persons or persons 
out of work are habitually fed or provided with a place to sleep, 
whether under public or private management, shall be deemed 
a wayfarers' lodge within the meaning of this act. Every build- 
ing not licensed as an inn, having a capacity for housing ten 
or more persdns, in which persons are lodged for a price of 
twenty-five cents or less for each person for a day of twenty- 
four hours, or for any part thereof, or free, or in return for any 
work, service or value rendered, shall be deemed a public lodging 
house within the meaning of this act. 

Section 2. The state board of charity shall visit and inspect, 
at least once in each year, every wayfarers' lodge and every 
public lodging house found within the commonwealth, and for 
this purpose shall be authorized to enter upon any premises 
where such lodge or lodging house is maintained, at any or all 
times of the day or night. 

Section 3. The said board shall have authority to consult 
with and advise individuals or officers conducting any such 
lodge or lodging house regarding the conduct of the same and 
the best methods of serving the public welfare thereby, and 
may, in its discretion, transmit a statement of its findings as a 
result of its inspection or consultation to any person, officer or 
board properly interested therein. 

Section 4. The said board may require of all persons, offi- 
cers or boards conducting a wayfarers' lodge or a public lodging 
house such reports of facts and circumstances relative thereto, 
its inmates and its administration as the board may deem ad- 
visable. 

Section 5. The said board shall include in its annual report 
to the governor and council a detailed report of its inspection 
and supervision hereunder, and such other matters relating to 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 143 

wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses as it may deem 
proper. 

Section. 6. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 
[Approved June 2, 1914- 

Each year since the passage of this statute the Board has 
sought an appropriation sufficient to allow the appointment of 
an inspector to carry on this work, but no appropriation has 
thus far been granted, and no inspector has been appointed. 

By placing additional burdens, however, upon the Board's 
almshouse inspector some information and some results have 
been obtained towards the proper execution of the new function. 
Returns have been made to the Board by local boards of police 
and overseers of the poor covering 111 lodging houses, viz., 16 
charitable, 92 commercial and 3 municipal. All of these estab- 
lishments have been visited during the year with the following 
results: 66 houses visited in 7 different cities outside of Boston 
were found not to fall within the terms of the statute; 3 have 
been closed following correspondence "with local boards of 
health, namely, 1 in Boston, 2 in Lawrence. One, located in 
Lynn, has been put on probation by the local authorities pend- 
ing improvement in house conditions. 

It seems certain from inspection thus far carried on that 
there are in the cities outside of Boston many lodging houses 
falling within the provisions of this law that are not at present 
licensed by local boards. Two establishments, both of them 
railroad Y. M. C. A. lodging houses, have been inspected, and 
appear to fall within this latter group. Before full effectiveness 
can be given to this salutary law it will be necessary, in the 
opinion of this Board, to make thorough search throughout 
the Commonwealth for all establishments that may properly 
fall within the provisions of the statute. In the work thus far 
the Board has met cordial co-operation from local authorities, 
and feels that a thoroughgoing system of supervision would 
result in marked benefit to local communities as well as a 
measure of protection to the lodging house that seeks to carry 
on a legitimate business under a fair standard of sanitation 
and fire protection. 



144 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ADMINISTRATIVE DUTIES OF THE BOARD. 

The State Outdoor Poor. 

Numbers. 

Unsettled persons in distress are aided in the first instance 
by the city or town in which they are so found. For purposes 
of administration, these State cases are divided into the fol- 
lowing classifications: — 

(a) The sick State poor (Revised Laws chapter 85, sections 
14, 15). 

(b) Cases of dangerous diseases (Acts of 1902, chapter 213, 
amended by Acts of 1907, chapter 386, and Acts of 1909, chap- 
ter 380). 

(c) Cases of wife-settlement (Revised Laws, chapter 80, sec- 
tion 1, chapter 85, section 16, amended by Acts of 1909, chap- 
ter 98). 

(d) Cases of temporary aid (Revised Laws, chapter 81, sec- 
tion 21, amended by Acts of 1903, chapter 355, amended by 
Acts of 1912, chapter 331). 

The statutes provide that the expense of such relief, follow- 
ing proper notice to the Board, and approval after considera- 
tion, shall be reimbursed by the Commonwealth. In accord- 
ance with these laws 17,879 such notices were received during 
the official year from 249 cities and towns, on account of 
36,964 persons and 12,335 patients, a net decrease of 2,026, 
or about lOf- per cent, from the previous year. Of these 
notices, 8,283,concerning 8,287 individuals, were on account of 
persons too sick to be removed; 3,523 notices, concerning 3,523 
individuals, were on account of persons sick with dangerous 
diseases; 908 notices, concerning 4,111 individuals, were for 
cases of wife-settlement; and 5,165 notices, covering 21,043 
individuals, were for temporary aid and transportation. Of 
the total number of notices above mentioned, 3,153, concerning 
8,247 individuals, were in cases on account of which a previous 
notice had been received during the year. 

(a) Cases of Sick State Poor. — The 8,283 notices of sick 
State poor were sent by 160 cities and towns, concerning 8,287 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 145 

persons, who were represented as too ill to be removed. This 
number shows a net increase in the number of notices over the 
previous year of 609, or about 8 per cent, and, as compared 
with the official year, 1913-14, an increase of 438, or about 
5f per cent. The largest number of notices received in any 
one month was 861 in January, the smallest, 582 in October. 
Of these 8,283 notices, 4,482, or about 54 per cent, were from 
the city of Boston, viz., 4,436 from the Boston City Hospital, 
29 from the institutions department, and 17 from the Boston 
Lying-in Hospital. The number of visits made by the officers 
of the Board in the investigation of these 8,283 notices was 
18,436. As a result of these investigations the overseers of the 
poor were directed to discontinue aid in 1,473 cases, on account 
of the recovery of the patient sufficiently to permit of his re- 
moval to the State Infirmary. In 307 cases aid was refused 
because at the time of the application the patient could have 
been removed without danger. Out of the 6,094 cases investi- 
gated by the visitors, settlements were found in 102, covering 
102 persons. Among those reported as sick there were 602 
deaths. 

(6) Cases of Dangerous Diseases. — The number of notices 
received was 3,523 from 111 cities and towns, concerning 3,523 
persons, all patients. These figures show a net increase of 205, 
or about 6 per cent over the previous year, and, as compared 
with the year 1913-14, an increase of 331, or 10 T \ per cent. 
Of these 3,523 notices, 1,244, or about 35 ^ per cent, were from 
the city of Boston. The following diseases were reported: 
actinomycosis, 1; amebic dysentery, 3; anterior poliomyelitis, 
394; cerebrospinal meningitis, 9; diphtheria, 805; leprosy, 2; 
measles, 196; ophthalmia neonatorum, 79; scarlet fever, 453; 
septic sore throat, 2; smallpox, 6; suppurative conjunctivitis, 
40; tuberculosis, 1,336; typhoid fever, 181; whooping cough, 16. 
The number of visits made by the officers of the Board in these 
cases was 6,121, and of 1,921 new cases investigated, settlements 
were found in 258, covering 258 persons. 

(c) Cases of Wife-settlement. — The number of notices re- 
ceived was 908 from 46 cities and towns, concerning 4,111 
persons, of whom 525 were sick. These figures show a net 
decrease in the number of notices as compared with the pre- 



146 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

vious year of 700, or about 43 per cent, and as compared with 
the year 1913-14 a decrease of 159, or about 15 per cent. Of 
these 908 notices, 502, or about 55 per cent, were from the 
city of Boston. As these 908 notices represent men whose 
families have settlements in some city or town within the 
Commonwealth, and 15 of these men were found to have a 
settlement, the total number aided by the State was 893, of 
whom 381 were sick. The number of visits made in these cases 
was 1,200. As a result of the visits, the local authorities were 
advised to discontinue aid in 1 case. 

(d) Cases of Temporary Aid. — The number of notices re- 
ceived was 5,165, concerning 21,043 persons from 206 cities 
and towns. The largest number of notices received in any one 
month was 1,478 in January, and the smallest number 156 in 
May. The whole number shows a net decrease, as compared 
with the preceding year, of 2,140, or about 29^ per cent, and 
with the year 1913-14 an increase of 317, or about 6j per cent. 
Of these notices, 750, or about 14j per cent, were received 
from the city of Boston. The number of visits made under 
these notices was 5,631. There were 1,365 new cases investi- 
gated by agents of the Board, and 314 settlements were found, 
covering 1,207 persons. As a result of visitation, aid was 
discontinued in 421 cases, and in 9 cases aid was refused. 

Transportation has been furnished during the year to 44 
persons; of these, 1 was sent to Canada and 43 to other States, 
as follows: Connecticut, 1; Illinois, 3; Maine, 1; Michigan, 3; 
New Hampshire, 3; New York, 7; North Dakota, 3; Rhode 
Island, 6; Vermont, 16. (Revised Laws, chapter 81, section 
21.) 

Transportation has also been provided for 15 shipwrecked 
seamen from Chatham to Boston. (Revised Laws, chapter 66, 
section 7.) 

Cost. 
The number, amount and allowance of the bills examined 
by the Board on account of cases of sick State poor, wife- 
settlement, dangerous diseases, temporary aid and burials are 
shown in the following tabulation. It is to be noted that the 
total shown in this -table may vary somewhat from the total 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



147 



paid out of the treasury during the fiscal year from the appro- 
priation in question. This possible variance arises from the 
fact that bills audited by this Board are in some cases not 
actually paid during the year for which the audit is shown. 
For actual expenditures out of these respective appropriations 
see page 210. 



Classes of Cases 


Bills 


Claims 


Allowance 


Deduction 


Sick State Poor: — 










Boston City Hospital 


3,019 


$45,697 51 


$39,706 80 


$5,990 71 


Other cases 


2,564 


49,231 28 


41,087 76 


8,143 52 


Wife-settlement 


914 


9,827 00 


9,204 94 


622 06 


Dangerous diseases: — 










Boston City Hospital 


910 


31,173 00 


27,828 43 


3,344 57 


Other cases 


1,704 


62,562 02 


52,171 40 


10,390 62 


Temporary aid 


5,093 


158,720 91 


149,999 92 


8,720 99 


Mothers with dependent children . 


5,055 


302,448 62 


299,998 78 


2,449 84 


Burial 


761 


9,041 79 


7,999 74 


1,042 05 


Totals 


20,020 


$668,702 13 


$627,997 77 


$40,704 36 



The item for temporary aid in the above tabulation includes 
$247.65 expended for transportation of the 44 State paupers 
above referred to, and $35.60 for the conveyance of the 15 
shipwrecked seamen. 



Classes of Cases 


Cases 
investigated 


Settlements 
found 


Persons 
covered 


Sick State poor 


6,094 


102 


102 


Wife-settlement 


200 


15 


15 


Temporary aid 


1,365 


314 


1,207 


Dangerous diseases 


1,921 


258 


258 


Burial 


562 


7 


7 


Totals 


10,142 


696 


1,589 



148 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Settlement Work. 
The following table is a summary of the work done during 
the year, in the examination and in the investigation of settle- 
ments of inmates of the State institutions : — 



Institutions 


.2 

*43 


g 


a 
o 

C3 


43 

a 

a 

OS 


S-i 


O 

a 




s 


m 
0> 

o 


a 

1 


o 


02 

o 




State Infirmary .... 




3,796 


828 


521 


263 


141 


925 


State Farm .... 






5,291 


158 


96 


63 


29 


188 


Lakeville State Sanatorium . 






377 


222 


200 


20 


- 


220 


North Reading State Sanatorium 






223 


149 


128 


16 


- 


144 


Rutland State Sanatorium . 






426 


321 


298 


37 


- 


335 


Westfield State Sanatorium 






190 


151 


139 


20 


- 


159 


Massachusetts Hospital School 






47 


47 


40 


11 


- 


51 


Norfolk State Hospital 






751 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Office .... 








220 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Danvers State Hospital 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Foxborough State Hospital 








- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Monson State Hospital . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


School for Feeble-minded 








- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


6 


Taunton State Hospital . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Westborough State Hospital 






- 


- 


- 


- 


3 


3 


Worcester State Hospital 






- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Totals 




11,321 


1,876 


1,422 


430 


187 


2,039 



Cases pending November 30,1915 
Cases pending November 30, 1916 



822 
659 



Removals. 
The Board is charged with the duty of removing sane paupers 
to cities or towns within the State or, when not belonging in 
Massachusetts, to the State or place where they belong. The 
following table shows the removals made during the year: — 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



149 







Removed 


FBOM — 




REMOVED TO- 


State 
Infirmary 


State 
Farm 


Local 
Office 


Totals 


Other countries: — 










Canada 


7 


2 


18 


27 


Great Britain 


3 


- 


8 


11 


Greece 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Italy 


- 


1 


13 


14 


Newfoundland 


2 


- 


4 


6 


Portugal (Azores) 


4 


- 


7 


11 


Russia . . . ..... 


- 


- 


5 


5 


Sweden 


- 


- 


6 


6 


West Indies 


- 


- 


4 


4 


Discharged to Hinted States Commis- 
sioner of Immigration for deportation 
to various countries .... 


. 19 


_ 


_ 


19 


Totals 


36 


3 


65 


104 


Other States: — 










California 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Connecticut 


18 


- 


3 


21 


District of Columbia .... 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Illinois 


2 


- 


7 


9 


Maine 


35 


1 


16 


52 


Maryland ....... 


1 


- 


3 


4 


Michigan . 


- 


- 


5 


5 


Nevada 


1 


- 


- 


1 


New Hampshire 


21 


2 


4 


27 


New Jersey 


1 


- 


4 


5 


New York 


20 


2 


38 


60 


North Carolina 


2 


- 


1 


3 


Ohio 


6 


- 


1 


7 


Oklahoma 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Pennsylvania 


1 


- 


19 


20 


Rhode Island 


9 


11 


17 


37 


South Carolina 


1 


- 


3 


4 


Vermont 


5 


- 


3 


8 


Virginia 


1 


- 


2 


3 


Totals 


125 


16 


129 


270 


Town of residence 


1,902 


4,948 


31 


6,881 


Grand total 


- 


- 


- 


7,255 



150 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 





Summary of Removals. 








1914 


1915 


1916 


To other countries 


201 

242 

6,838 


144 

322 

7,092 


104 
270 


To town of residence . 




6,881 


Totals 


7,281 


7,558 


7,255 







The After-care of Women and Children discharged by 
the Board from the State Infirmary. 
Five years have passed since the introduction of social service 
for women with children at the State Infirmary. During that 
time the Board has made some interesting observations. 

Unmarried Mothers. 

Contrary to the accepted view, the unmarried mothers who 
come to the State Infirmary are not more hopeless than the 
average unmarried mothers who apply to private charity. This 
has been borne out by follow-up work which shows that these 
women have been able to hold their own in the community. 
Presence at the Infirmary is often due to the woman's ignor- 
ance of other resources in the community; to her desire to 
shield herself; or to lack of money and inability to plan for the 
future, — a common fault. Private charities also have shut 
their doors on women who have syphilis and gonorrhea, how- 
ever slight the infection, and on the woman who is pregnant for 
a second time. Polish, Italian and Syrian women who have 
been considered unfit for our standards of living, because of the 
handicap of language and home training, have proved remark- 
ably quick in catching the atmosphere of the American home. 
They are strong, and, if cleanly, are invaluable on the small 
farm. All of the above-mentioned unmarried mothers could be 
cared for outside of a public institution if the community were 
more appreciative of the true situation and therefore more 
willing to give of their bounty. 

There is, however, a group of unmarried mothers who should 
rightly come to the State Infirmary. They are the feeble- 
minded, pronounced so by a competent physician, and those 
women who have had more than two illegitimate children. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 151 

The Married Woman with the Illegitimate Child. 

These women should be treated at least as well as the un- 
married mother. In the majority of cases the husband is in the 
old country, or has been absent for such long periods that the 
marriage bond has come to mean nothing. The future of these 
women should rightly be a problem for the private agency as 
well as the public. Note the large number in the statistics for 
1916. This may be because no other hospital will receive 
them. 

The Deserted Family. 
Deserted wives with their children often come to the State 
Infirmary, many for care during their confinement, which is a 
time when deserting husbands are apt to disappear. Unless 
relatives can be found it is exceedingly difficult to replace them 
in the community. If the woman is competent as a home- 
maker and mother, the State gladly rehabilitates the family, 
but when the woman is shiftless and without ambition, the only 
recourse is to take the older children and place the woman at 
work with her infant. It is interesting to note that a forced 
marriage is many times a factor in this kind of desertion, and 
that just as frequently the woman is a bad housekeeper. 
Several women after a year's supervision have proved them- 
selves trustworthy, so that the State has reunited the family. 

Feeble-mindedness. 
Feeble-mindedness though frequent is not as apparent among 
the patients at the State Infirmary as the public is apt to 
assume. In the last three years we have had 156 women exam- 
ined for mental deficiency; 62 were committable as feeble- 
minded and 5 as insane. There remain at the institution a 
goodly number who have been awaiting commitment for two 
years or more. Some of these we have been obliged to place 
out through the importunity of relatives, where early commit- 
ment has not been possible. If they abscond, which they do 
frequently, the Board has no legal right to return them to the 
State Infirmary, and they are then adrift in the community. 
It is a discouraging fact that during the past year out of 30 of 
these waiting cases the department has been able to find places 



152 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

in the schools for the feeble-minded for but 5. Needless to say, 
they are great trouble-makers in the institution. Fifty-six 
mental examinations have been made during the year, by which 
27 were found to be committable as feeble-minded and 4 as 
insane. 

Syphilis and Gonorrhea. 
Because it is necessary that the Infirmary accept the woman 
with syphilis and gonorrhea, it remains for the social service 
visitors, after the termination of her treatment there, to place 
her in the community with her baby. This has been done 
successfully with the co-operation of the out-patient department 
of the Massachusetts General Hospital and the Boston Dispen- 
sary. These women gain a better understanding of their 
physical condition and the care necessary for themselves and 
their babies. Women with doubtful Wassermanns and no 
other evidence of syphilis have frequently been sent to the 
State Infirmary, a disposition unnecessary and unfair both to 
the patient and to the institution. But until private hospitals 
are willing to open their wards to these patients the duty must 
fall to the public to care for them. But no woman need be 
admitted to the State Infirmary unless she is in so infectious a 
condition as to be a bed patient, and then she should remain 
only until sufficient treatment is given to make her non- 
infectious to the community. It behooves social agencies, who 
represent the public because of their interest in such matters, 
to see to it that general hospitals open their doors to patients 
of this type. Of the 183 cases dealt with by the social service 
visitors, 22 were admitted to the Infirmary with syphilis, and 
75 with gonorrhea. That is to say, about 50 per cent of all 
the cases were suffering from one or the other of these diseases. 
This percentage does not include the 26 doubtful Wassermanns. 

Discharges. . 
In the matter of discharges the Board has adhered strictly 
to a policy which requires that if a woman has recently come 
to the United States or to Massachusetts she should return to 
her own country or State. Better protection can be given her, 
whether she be normal or subnormal, by her family, friends 



Part I.]. GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 153 

and church than by a strange community. Furthermore, it is 
not the duty of this Commonwealth to bear the burden and 
responsibility of such a person; neither is Massachusetts helping 
the growth of other communities by so doing. These discharges 
are made carefully, and after assurance from the home place 
that there is some interested person in the town to receive her. 

There are many women of feeble intelligence who are not 
committable, but whom we have been obliged, nevertheless, 
to place in the community. These women have not kept their 
children with them after the first year because they are unable 
to discipline and to care intelligently for them. They are not 
successful in general housework, as they cannot grasp the com- 
plexity of the home; but they do routine work well and faith- 
fully. These women pay a part of the board of their children 
in proportion to their wages. 

Though opinions may vary, the Board still maintains as* a 
conclusion from experience that there are many of these mothers 
who are able to bring up their children well and live at the 
same time in good homes as general maid. The normal mother 
and baby are best placed together; indeed, the child of syph- 
ilitic inheritance may in this way have its only chance of life. 

Possibly the most interesting of all our discharges are those 
who have been at the State Infirmary at least once before. In 
the last Hve years there have been 3 who have returned for a 
second illegitimate pregnancy; 2 for legitimate pregnancy; 3 
who, while at work under supervision have been proved to be 
committable as feeble-minded, have returned to the State In- 
firmary to await commitment; and 3 who have returned for 
medical care. The Board in their plan to secure free care in 
general hospitals for these patients who go out of the Infirmary 
have received generous co-operation from hospital authorities 
and from child-placing agencies, who have been willing to ac- 
knowledge the fact that because a woman has once been in the 
care of the State she need not therefore necessarily belong to 
the State. 

Supervision. 

The table at page 157 furnishes a glimpse of the activities 
carried on during the past year in the replacing of women in 
the community after discharge; the hospital care given to them 



154 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

and their children; and the many visits found necessary. On 
December 1, 1916, there were 165 women under supervision. 
The department is so limited in paid staff that this work has 
been done largely by volunteers; if, therefore, the Board has 
succeeded in helping these women at all it is due in large meas- 
ure to the faithfulness of the volunteers and to the excellence 
of the boarding homes which have been used. The visitor, for 
her part, has time only for the crisis in the girl's life. 

The following resume of some of the cases dealt with will 
show their urgent character and the demand for immediate 
action which they entail : — 

Case 1. — A young southern girl with second illegitimate child. 
Is handicapped by lameness. Unattractive personality. Suffer- 
ing from gonorrhea and syphilis. Not feeble-minded. Has but 
one intelligent and responsive relative^ a sister, in the western 
part of the State, who is financially unable to do anything for 
the girl and the baby. After much intensive treatment at the 
State Infirmary this girl was placed out with her baby. The 
first two places were unsuccessful because she was undisciplined 
and untrained. She was then boarded with her baby for a 
month in a place where she was taught something of housework 
and how to care for her child. Finally, a place with an old 
lady, who wanted a companion and some one to do light house- 
work, was found. Girl and baby have been in this home over 
one year. Both have required constant medical supervision, 
which was accomplished by visits monthly to the Massachusetts 
General Hospital. Free medicine was given and transportation 
one way, but, other than this, the girl has received no financial 
help, and has been able in addition to pay a dentist bill. Her 
wage is $2.50 per week. The intelligence which this girl has 
shown in the care of her child and of herself is remarkable, and 
is undoubtedly due to the constant encouragement she has re- 
ceived at the hospital and from her visitor. 

Case 2. — Another girl for whom the visitor has been needed 
at many critical moments has now been working for over one 
year in a clergyman's family in a small town, earning $4 per 
week. Her boy is three years old. He is her second illegitimate 
child, the first having died in a hospital when about two months 
old. She was brought up in an orphan asylum and knows 
nothing of her parents or relatives. At eighteen she came to one 
of our manufacturing cities to work in a restaurant. She be- 
came pregnant and was sent to Sherborn for ten months. When 
she left Sherborn she was as much alone as before, and had no 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 155 

one to befriend her. Naturally, she returned to those who 
would give her a good time and who seemed friendly. In less 
than one year she became pregnant again and was sent to the 
State Infirmary. She was placed at housework with her baby 
when he was four months old. She accepted three very difficult 
places with much determination. At one time life seemed to 
have become almost too hard for her to bear, but the visitor 
met her in the right way and succeeded in persuading her to 
leave the city and go to her present home, where she is doing 
well. 

Case 3. — Another girl, in this country eight years, came to 
the State Infirmary for a second pregnancy, the first child having 
died. The girl was examined for feeble-mindedness, but with 
the knowledge then in possession of the department was found 
not committable. She was tried out in the community with, 
and then without, her baby; and with the added information 
thus gained she was, after a lapse of eight months, committed 
to Waverley. Supervision in the community of many of these 
border-line cases adds much information that months in the 
State Infirmary cannot give. 

Case 4- — One woman, a tyrant in the institution, yet not 
committable as feeble-minded, was considered a defective de- 
linquent. It was necessary under the law to discharge her, yet 
through the efforts of this field service she has worked for four- 
teen months in" a hospital ward doing routine work under super- 
vision so well that the hospital has repeatedly urged that another 
such person be sent them. 

During the year a total of 299 visits have been made to girls 
under supervision, while 167 girls have come to the Board's 
offices for advice and consultation. Replacements have been 
made in 70 cases, and 47 have been given hospital care at the 
Infirmary or elsewhere. 

Admissions. 
The admissions to the State Infirmary during the year were 
somewhat smaller than in 1915, possibly because immigration 
has decreased under war conditions; possibly, also, because it 
has become known that a woman cannot leave her baby at the 
State Infirmary at public charge and go back into the com- 
munity without responsibility, as though nothing had happened. 
The mother is, at least, financially responsible for the child, 
whether the baby be with her or boarded out. As a third 



156 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



possibility, social workers may also be realizing more clearly 
than before that the State Infirmary is not for the care of 
persons with city or town settlements, and cannot legally re- 
ceive such cases. 

Classification of Admissions by Legal Status and Condition of Motherhood. 





Women 


Children 


Single Women and Children 

Pregnant for first child . . 

Not pregnant but accompanied by first illegitimate child . 

Pregnant for second illegitimate child (accompanied by 9 ille- 
gitimate children.) 
Not pregnant but accompanied by second illegitimate child 

Pregnant for third illegitimate child 

Not pregnant but syphilitic 


54 
23 
19 
14 
5 
10 


23 

9 

15 


Married Women and Children 

Pregnant for legitimate children (accompanied by 13 children) 

Not pregnant (accompanied by 34 children) .... 

Pregnant for illegitimate child (accompanied by 7 legitimate 
children) 


125 

23 
11 

24 


47 

13 

34 

7 


Total of women and children admitted .... 


58 
183 


54 
101 


Total number of women and children * 


284 



Applications at Office. — Thirty-five women who applied at office were disposed of outside of the 

State Infirmary. 



Discharges. 

The process of discharging cases from the State Infirmary 
takes longer than it should, due to the pressure of work on the 
individual visitor, the difficulty of finding good homes for 
mother and baby, and the unwillingness of private agencies 
to supervise. Some of these women stay far too long at the 
Infirmary for their welfare and the good of their children. 

Deportations by the Federal authorities have increased this 
year, but only to ports in Canada, England and Ireland. The 
State itself is not sending girls to countries that are at war, 
which fact means that many who ordinarily would have re- 
turned to Poland, Syria and Italy must have places found for 
them here. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



157 



It is worthy of note that of the 184 children discharged last 
;yuar only 21 became State minor wards. 

°The largest number of discharges under one heading are those 
who have been placed at work in the hope that they may 
become self-supporting and self-respecting members of the 
community. Only 16 women and 8 children were discharged 
to the care of private agencies. 

Classification of Discharges showing Disposition Made. 





Women 


Children 


To city or town 

To other States 

To other countries 

To United States Immigration Commission .... 

To schools for the feeble-minded 

To insane hospitals 

To State Minor Wards Department 

To relatives 

To friends 

To private agencies 

To courts . . . . . . . . 

To employment 

Absconded from State Infirmary . 


11 
5 
3 

12 
5 
4 

59 
7 

16 
2 

73 
4 


8 
4 
2 
2 

21 
69 
5 

8 

63 
2 


Totals 


201 


184 


Total number of women and children discharged 


385 



Co-operation. 
Co-operation between public and private agencies increases 
as the interrelationship of problems becomes better known. 
In the care of these difficult cases it should be more open- 
minded and generous, even, than now. Criticism is good, and 
the public need constructive criticism, but the public agency 
scarcely merits the sort of destructive criticism that it often 
receives. There can be no hard and fast line between public 
and private in charitable enterprise. Both are the public in 
relation to the community and its welfare. Though the public 
treasury may bear the larger share of the financial burden, the 
private agencies have large opportunities to experiment and 
supervise. The public agency, because of the magnitude of its 



158 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

duties, cannot give all the supervision that is desirable. It 
depends, therefore, upon private social agencies and upon f - 
telligent public-spirited individuals. If public and priva"o 
efforts can be brought to bear in the future upon such difficult 
problems as these without so much differentiation as heretofore, 
the result of the combined labors will be definitely better for 
those in distress. Such united forces would be^ a power for 
social betterment in the community. 

Legal Work. 

In all, 52 cases were referred for legal consideration, resulting 
in the commitment of 4 cases to Wrentham State School, and 
court action in 19 other cases. One petition for commitment 
of a feeble-minded person was denied by the court when the 
relatives of the girl agreed to remove her from the State. The 
other 18 court cases were proceedings to provide support for 
children. A continuing order of support was obtained in 11 
cases, 10 being concerned with illegitimate children and 1 with 
legitimate children. The orders of support as to illegitimate 
children vary, the general average being about $2.50 per week. 
Lump settlements were made in 3 cases. In 1 case a girl re- 
fused to proceed with further prosecution after a warrant had 
issued. In 1 case the child in question died during the pro- 
ceedings. In 1 case the defendant was never apprehended 
after warrant issued. In 1 case proceedings are pending. 
Twenty-nine other cases were disposed of as shown in the 
detailed statement at page 160. 

As stated in the last report, probation officers in their re- 
spective courts have generally taken upon themselves the duty 
of collecting money which the court orders the defendant to 
pay, and, in some cases, the money is paid directly to the 
mothers of the children for whom the support was intended. 
The amount of $1,090.07 was referred to this Board in con- 
nection with sundry of the above cases. On December 1, 1916, 
there were twenty bank books on hand, six of which had been 
opened within the past year. In addition to this, three lump 
settlements were made with the approval of the court where 
the sum of $950 was paid for the benefit of the children in- 
volved in the proceedings. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 159 

It is extremely difficult to keep an accurate account of all 
moneys which accrue for the benefit of children through pro- 
ceedings instituted under the supervision of this department 
because of the fact that, as above stated, probation officers 
in some places pay their money directly to the complainant. 

The present law under which these cases are being prosecuted, 
which has been in effect since July 1, 1913, has been effective 
in producing speedy results. It is a decided improvement upon 
the old bastardy law. 

The practice of making lump settlements has been largely 
abandoned. This is in accordance with the attitude of the 
court. Settlements of a few hundred dollars, formerly common, 
are now made only in exceptional cases where the circumstances 
warrant such a disposition, and then only with the approval of 
the court. The practice of making a continuing order of sup- 
port, which takes the form of a small sum payable weekly, 
naturally reduces very much the amount of actual money 
collected during the year, but the orders, when once entered, 
are lasting and can be extended through a long period of years, 
so that, even though a large amount of money may not be 
shown as collected within the space of a year, as formerly, 
nevertheless, the law is effectively serving its purpose. The 
present law, being criminal, this department has adopted a 
practice of investigating every case thoroughly, even to an 
attempt to interview the alleged father, before presenting the 
case to the court upon an application for a warrant. This 
practice we believe to be proper in this particular class of 
criminal cases; the reasons can be well appreciated. But this 
practice is not uniformly followed by all societies handling this 
class of cases. Some seem to feel that the best procedure is 
to arrest the alleged father immediately upon the accusation 
of the complainant, and then adjust the case after the defend- 
ant is in custody, the general purpose being to avoid the risk 
of having an alleged father disappear to escape arrest subse- 
quent to an interview before arrest. It is extremely doubtful 
whether or not this latter practice is one that ought to hold, 
especially in the class of cases which come to attention at the 
State Infirmary. It is not unusual to have false stories told 
on the first interview and false accusations made. Arrest upon 



160 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the uncorroborated statements of such complainants would do 
irreparable injury. In other cases, a thorough investigation 
raises a reasonable doubt as to the truth of the accusation. 
It is submitted that the practice adopted by this department 
is not only warranted, but ought to prevail as a matter of 
fair play. Of course, exceptional cases arise where the charge 
of the complainant is accompanied by strong corroboration, 
but, as a general rule, an alleged father ought to be entitled 
to be heard before being subjected to arrest. Persons familiar 
with this class of cases know well what difficulties a defendant 
must encounter, especially under the present law, in refuting 
an unjust charge of this nature. It must be admitted, too, 
that cases arise where a thorough investigation sometimes re- 
duces the mother's first accusation to a question of grave 
doubt. The Board agrees with the Association of Justices 
when they say, "It is hoped that the perfunctory practice 
permissible under the old law will give way at once to the 
requirement of proof beyond a reasonable doubt before sub- 
jecting the defendant to the greater and more lasting liabilities 
under the new law, as well as the public disgrace involved in 
the adjudication." 1 

Classification of Cases in which Legal Action was taken. 

All cases . .52 

Commitment (feeble-minded) . . .'■•■'. . . .4 
Case contested, commitment denied by court on agree- 
ment of girl to leave State 1 

5 

Court Cases. 
Continuing order of support, 10 illegitimate and 1 legiti- 
mate 11 

Lump settlements, court 3 

1 case, $100 paid to this office. 

2 cases, $650 paid to probation office. 

Girl refused to proceed after warrant 1 

Child died during proceedings 1 

Pending 1 

Warrant never served, defendant not apprehended . . 1 

18 

1 Report No. 1, June, 1913, Committee on Law and Procedure, Association of Justices of Dis- 
trict, Police and Municipal Courts of Massachusetts. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 161 



Other Cases. 

Girl refused to prosecute .2 

Settled out of court - . .2 

1 lump settlement, $300. 

1 continuing order, $2. 

No prosecution 3 

Marriages 4 

Adjusted 4 

Referred to other authorities 5 

Alleged fathers not located .6 

Child died .3 

29 



THE STATE MINOR WARDS. 
Children in the Care and Custody of the Board. 

By reference to the tables on page 174, et seq., it appears that 
at the beginning of the last official year, December 1, 1915, 
there were 5,938 children in the care and custody of the Board, 
— 330 delinquent children, 41 wayward children, 3,183 neg- 
lected children and 2,384 dependent children. There were 
916 children received during the year, viz., 138 delinquent 
children, 6 wayward children, 352 neglected children and 420 
dependent children. The total number under care during the 
year was, therefore, 6,854. There were 788 discharged, viz., 
144 delinquent children, 11 wayward children, 301 neglected 
children and 332 dependent children. At the close of the year, 
November 30, 1916, there remained in charge of the Board, 
therefore, 6,066 children, classified as: delinquent children, 324; 
wayward children, 36; neglected children, 3,234; and depend- 
ents, 2,472. 

Of the 6,066 children under care November 30, 1916, 5,658 
were over three years of age and cared for as follows: in places 
receiving wages, 758; in places free of expense to the State for 
board, 569; in places partly supported by the State, 167; in 
places fully supported by the State, 3,363; at the State In- 
firmary and other institutions not penal, subject to care and 
treatment, 570; married, 27; in United States service, 21; and 
whereabouts unknown, 183. 



162 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The 408 children in the total under care November 30, 1916, 
who were under three years of age, were classified as follows: 
in homes free of expense, 22; in homes fully supported by the 
State, 360; at the State Infirmary or other institutions, not 
penal, 26. One hundred seventy-one in this group reached 
the age of three during the year. 1 

Children under Three Years of Age. 

The total number of infants in charge of the Board at the 
beginning of the official year, December 1, 1915, was 408; the 
number received during the year was 284, making the whole 
number supported 692. There remained at the close of the 
official year, November 30, 1916, 408 infants. Of the 692 
infants supported, 11 were legally adopted and 171 were trans- 
ferred, having reached the age of three years; 46 were dis- 
charged to parents or relatives, 1 to place of settlement, 8 to 
courts, 1 to Catholic Charitable Bureau and 46 died. 

Seventy-nine of the 284 infants received were committed by 
the overseers of the poor, and 6 by. the superintendent of the 
State Infirmary, under the provisions of section 20, chapter 83 
of the Revised Laws. Twenty-six of this number were found- 
lings, and the remainder were indigent infants having no known 
settlement in the Commonwealth. 

One hundred thirty-three children were received under section 
36, chapter 83; 1 was received under section 13, chapter 83; 
5 were removed from unsuitable boarding places under section 
26, and 2 under section 17, chapter 83; and 58 were committed 
as neglected under the provisions of chapter 334 as amended 
by chapter 131 of the Acts of the year 1909. 

The medical visitor and his assistants made 6,746 visits. 
This number includes visits to infant wards boarded in fam- 
ilies, investigation of homes of applicants for infant wards to 

1 In addition to these 6,066 children the Board had under supervision and visitation November 
30, 1916, 441 inmates of the Lyman School for Boys; 286 inmates of the State Industrial School 
for Girls; 214 inmates of the Industrial School for Boys; 1,216 boys and 380 girls in the custody 
of the Trustees for Massachusetts Training Schools outside of the schools; 158 boys and 113 girls 
inmates of the Massachusetts Hospital School; 149 boys and 174 girls inmates of the four State 
sanatoria; 57 boys and 103 girls inmates of the State Infirmary, who are either young infants with 
their mothers, or else under hospital treatment; 384 inmates of the county training schools, and 
1,249 children supported at the expense of the cities and towns, making, approximately, a total of 
10,980 children in the care and custody and under the supervision of the Board. 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 163 

board, and inspection of homes of applicants for licenses to 
board infants; also, physical examination of children at this 
office, at the Nursery and at the temporary home on Charles 
Street. 

There were 351 children admitted to the Nursery; 1 died 
there. 

The percentage of mortality for the year for the whole 
number supported was 6.64+. 

Two hundred fourteen of the 692 infants supported during 
the year were under one year of age. Twenty-nine of this 
number died, making the percentage of deaths for infants under 
one year of age 13.55. 

Of the 29 deaths of infants under one year of age at the 
time of admission to care, 5 died after reaching the age of one 
year, making the actual number of deaths of infants under one 
year 24 and the percentage 11.21. 

The mortality rate is higher than last year, — 6.64 as against 
5.39. Of the deaths in 1916, 18 died at the State Infirmary as 
against 9 in 1915. It will be seen that the increase in the num- 
ber of deaths of infants boarded in homes is slight, — 27 in 
1915 and 28 in 1916, showing that the increase of the mortality 
rate was nearly all due to the larger number of children 
who were in an unfit condition to be placed in homes when 
received. 

There were 26 foundlings received during the year, 4 more 
than last year. In 6 cases the parentage has been found. 

The epidemic of infantile paralysis in the late summer and 
fall months did not bear heavily on the State infants. There 
were only 2 cases. One of them died; the other is living, but 
has not entirely recovered from the paralysis. 

There have been fewer applications for children under three 
years old to board during the year, and the nurses have found 
more difficulty in securing good boarding homes for these 
children. 

Children over Three Years of Age. 

The total number of children over three years of age in 
charge of this department at the close of the past fiscal year 
was 5,658, — 2,361 girls and 3,297 boys, an increase of 108 for 



164 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

the year; 916 children were received during the period, which 
is 92 less than the number (1,008) received in 1915. 

One thousand two hundred five boys in our care are over 
fourteen years of age; 379, or 31 per cent, are attending school 
under the following conditions: 17 on parole, 16 receiving 
wages, 109 free of expense, 21 partly free and 216 for whom 
board is paid. 

Two hundred eighty-nine, or 46 per cent of the 628 girls 
over fourteen years, are attending school, of whom 107 are 
being boarded, 108 partly free, 32 kept free of expense, 33 
receiving wages and 9 on parole. 

Two hundred seventy-one boys and 12 girls are learning trades. 

A Review of the Gifts who became of Age during the Year. 

During the past year 85 girls reached the age of twenty-one, 
and passed from the care of this department. An analysis of 
these cases has been made for the purpose of showing the 
effort for proper development of these girls and the results 
obtained. It is not a complete study, but is intended to indi- 
cate what we have tried to do for them. 

This number (85) represents 20 received as dependent 
children under the provisions of section 36, chapter 83 of the 
Revised Laws, and 65 committed by court, — 5 as wayward, 
2 as juvenile offenders and 58 as neglected children. 

The 20 children received under the provisions of section 36 
were from the following sources : — 

Overseers of the poor 8 

Parents 5 

Relatives and friends 2 

Private societies . . . . . .3 

State adult poor 2 

The cases of those girls who were committed to the custody 
of this Board as wayward and juvenile offenders are of special 
interest. The two girls in the latter class have the following 
histories: — 

L. G. — Found guilty of larceny and committed to this Board 
when fifteen years of age. Child had no proper influences in 
her own home. She was retained by us for a few months and 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 165 

then placed in her uncle's family under supervision, where she 
has since remained. 

W. S. — Foundling in Vermont. Adopted at the age of three 
months by a family living in that State. Later they moved to 
Massachusetts. When she was ten years old the mother com- 
plained of her adopted daughter's disobedience at home and 
school, resulting in commitment to the custody of this Board. 
At first she was careless and irresponsible, but gradually de- 
veloped into a good, reliable girl. After completing the sopho- 
more class at high school she entered a training school for nurses 
two years ago, where her work has been thoroughly satisfactory. 
Except for one letter received in 1911 her parents by adoption 
have shown no interest in the girl since her commitment. 

The following is a brief summary of the history of five 
children committed by court as wayward: — 

K. S. — Committed at age of thirteen. Father dead; mother 
committed as insane; one brother in school for the feeble-minded. 
Girl remained at board under the closest supervision for three 
years, when examination by an alienist indicated feeble-minded- 
ness. She was placed at the State Infirmary awaiting admission 
to the State School at Wrentham. 

J. B. — Committed at age of sixteen. Father dead; mother 
was employed in hotel where the girl helped after school hours. 
After a few months mother went to California, leaving girl with- 
out supervision. She seemed to be drifting, and was in need of 
restraint and proper control. After commitment she was placed 
by this department in a free home where she stayed one year. 
Remained in second home one year and was married at the age 
of eighteen. She now has a comfortable home. 

M. M. — Home conditions very poor. Mother dead and 
father intemperate — not capable of exercising any control over 
girl, who was found to be sleeping in cellars and doorways. She 
was committed at the age of eleven. After placement the girl 
showed more than average ability and graduated from grammar 
school. She was placed at domestic service and attended even- 
ing school. While under our care her conduct was satisfactory 
in every way. 

A. P. — Committed at the age of sixteen. This girl came 
from a home in which intemperance and immorality existed. 
A brother and sister had been previously committed to the 
school for the feeble-minded. She was physically in poor condi- 
tion, was examined by an alienist after reception and showed 
marked deficiency, but was not sufficiently backward to warrant 



166 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

commitment. After two years a second examination showed the 
same result. Doctor advised placing out again. Girl was a 
good worker, always amiable but not responsible, and was un- 
moral. A third examination at the expiration of another year 
resulted in her commitment to the State School at Wrentham. 
G. E. — Parents were unable to control this girl who was a 
persistent truant from school. She was committed to our cus- 
tody at the age of nine years, and remained eighteen months in 
the first home, where her conduct was satisfactory. She was 
removed on account of illness in the home. At the expiration of 
three years she was placed with her parents on probation. At 
the age of eighteen she was married and has continued to live 
with her mother. 

The following table shows the ages at which these children 
were received by this department : — 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD, 



167 



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168 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



As will be seen by the above table, the majority of children 
included in this study were received between the ages of seven 
and fourteen. Two dependent cases received when nineteen 
years of age have the following histories : — 

Margaret, mother of an illegitimate child and having no 
home, was received in order that she might be under some 
supervision. She took excellent care of her child, to whom she 
seemed devoted, and gave satisfaction in the family in which 
she was placed. One month before becoming of age the girl 
disappeared and her present address is unknown. 

Minerva, mother of two illegitimate children, was living 
under conditions which made it necessary for her to be taken 
under supervision away from her own home. She was sent to 
the State Infirmary, where a third child was born shortly after 
her admission. Mother and child have been placed together in 
a family and transferred to the care of the Adult Poor Division. 

Five children were under three years of age when received. 
Two of this number have had but one placement by this de- 
partment and have remained in the same homes eighteen years. 
They are considered members of the families in which they 
live. One of these girls was married shortly after she became 
of age, and the other is a millinery designer. 

Fifteen other girls have remained permanently in homes 
where they were originally located, having had but one place- 
ment. The length of time they have remained in these homes 
varies from six to twelve years. 

K. L., who has been in one home ten years, is worthy of 
special mention on account of her diligence and thrift. When 
discharged at the age of twenty-one she had a bank account 
amounting to $625. 

The following shows the occupation or civil condition of each 
girl at the time of her discharge from custody: — 



(a) Married .... 


12 


(g) At school .... 


2 


(6) Domestic service 


26 


(h) At home .... 


5 


(c) Trained nurse and train- 




(i) Wrentham State School . 


7 


ing schools 


8 


(j) Transferred to Adult Poor 




(d) Teacher .... 


1 


Division .... 


4 


(e) Employed in factory 


6 


(k) Other institutions 


4 


(f) Clerk in office or store 


6 


(I) Whereabouts unknown 


4 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 189 

(a) The twelve girls who were married while under our care 
remained in custody until they became twenty-one years of 



(b) The average wage of 26 girls employed in domestic 
service is $3.25 a week. 

(c) One girl is employed as a practical nurse; the others are 
still in training; two are to graduate within a few months. 

(d) K. M., a teacher, has been six years under our care, has 
been graduated from normal school and employed as teacher 
for the past year, remaining in the same home in which she was 
originally placed. * 

(e) Six girls employed in factories earned from $6 to $12 a 
week. The average wage is $10. 

(g) Two girls classified as "at school" are attending business 
college and normal school. 

Eight of the girls included in this analysis attended trade 
schools; 2, business college; 1, after two years at high school, 
attended a seminary for one year; 1 graduated from normal 
school; 13 were given a high school course; and 9 completed 
the grammar grades. 

The girls are trained to save a part of their earnings, and 
at the time of their discharge from our care many of them had 
a creditable bank account. The savings of 56 girls aggregated 
$4,600. This represented savings of amounts varying from $10 
to $625. Three had saved over $400, 6 over $200 and 15 over 
$100 each. 

Investigating Department. 

That the economic stress of the past year has been relieved 
shows itself in the decrease of applications which have come to 
this department. A comparison of statistics gives for the year 
1915-16, 1,319 applications and 276 children received under 
the provisions of section 36, as against 1,337 applications and 
305 children received in the year 1914-15. 

Emergencies occasionally arise which necessitate making 
immediate provision for children, giving no opportunity for a 
complete investigation. In cases of this type a section 20 
commitment is advised, and an after-care is made in order that 
conditions may be as thoroughly investigated as possible. In 



170 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

this classification the greater numbers are foundlings and 
children abandoned in boarding homes. Many times the clues 
are too meager to permit any action. 

An analysis of the foundlings committed to the care of the 
Board during the year shows the following conditions: There 
were 26 such commitments, in age varying from one of two 
years to one new-born baby. The largest number of any one 
age was 7, who were approximately two weeks old. Five of 
these infants were in such poor physical condition that they 
soon died (3 of congenital syphilis). In 18 cases there were no 
clues whatever, so no effort was made to carry on an investi- 
gation. In 2, some work has been done, but so far has led to 
nothing. Carelessness on the part of the lying-in hospital in 
marking clothing has prevented further investigation in one 
case. In 4 instances identification has been possible through 
the required hospital marking, and in 2 the mothers have been 
located by other clues. 

The following case, which has worked out well in spite of 
lack of co-operation on the part of those from whom it might 
be expected, illustrates the department's endeavors: — 

In January the local overseers of a small town reported 
finding a two weeks old male infant in a doorway, and later, 
instead of committing to the Minor Wards as advised, informed 
us that a neighbor had taken him with a view to adoption. 
In May, however, this woman decided to give up the baby, 
and he was committed to the care of the Board under the pro- 
visions of section 20, chapter 83 of the Revised Laws. The 
only clue was a piece of tape with an indistinctly printed name 
on it, which had been sewed about his wrist. No other mark- 
ing appeared on the clothing, making it seem improbable that 
the child was born in a Massachusetts hospital. The near-by 
city was visited, and as the birth records showed no registration 
under the name on the band, a canvass of the lying-in hospitals 
was made. In one the band was identified, but as the mother 
had been a private patient little definite information could be 
obtained. 

The attending physician disclaimed any knowledge of this 
particular patient, stating that he was not acquainted with her 
and had seen her only once at his office. He admitted failure 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 171 

to register the birth, excusing himself on the grounds that he 
was sure the name was assumed. No co-operation was obtained 
from him, and he later evidently intentionally misled the in- 
vestigator with a false description of the mother. 

On her entrance to the hospital the mother had given the 
number of a telephone near her home, and though the people 
in whose house this telephone was located honestly did not 
know of the existence of the baby, and did not have any 
neighbors of the name mentioned, through them was obtained 
the name of a girl who had the same Christian name as that 
given by the mother, who was a patient of the same physician 
and who had been away from home in January, supposedly for an 
operation. They had no suspicions of anything wrong. Again 
the doctor was communicated with, but emphatically denied 
that the suspected girl was the mother of a child, and insisted 
she had been in a Boston hospital for an operation. 

The girl was finally located, and though she also denied 
knowing anything of this baby and insisted she had been a 
patient at the Massachusetts General Hospital, the latter state- 
ment could not be verified, and her appearance tallied with the 
description of the mother. On her refusal to visit the hospital 
and thereby clear herself of the charge, arrangements were made 
to have a nurse call on her. By this time, evidently, the 
physician and she both became alarmed, and she confessed 
that the baby was hers and that she was guilty of abandon- 
ment. No arrest was made, though the chief of police was 
most co-operative. 

The mother was then told that the responsibility of the 
child's future care devolved on her, and she agreed that he 
should be provided for in her own home. Instead of this she 
placed him in an institution where he remained two days. At 
this time her parents were first informed of the existence of 
the child, and the chief of police threatened to press the charge 
of abandonment unless satisfactory provision for him was made 
in his own home. 

It was late in July when this baby finally became settled in 
his proper home, and for a while he was kept under visitation. 
The last visit found him firmly established as a member of the 
family, having won a place in his mother's heart. 



172 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

This case represents but one branch of the work of the in- 
vestigators, but is typical of the aim to preserve the family 
relationship and to place responsibility where it belongs. 

The following statistics are self-explanatory: — 

Statistics of Investigating Depaetment. 
Applications (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws) pend- 
ing December 1, 1915 357 

New applications (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws), . 1,319 

1,676 

Disposition as follows : — 

Applications withdrawn 114 

Advised only ..'... 30 

Assumed by relatives 333 

Assumed by public agencies : — 

Mothers' aid 10 

Other public agencies . 332 

Assumed by private agencies 164 

Received (chapter 83, section 36, Revised Laws) . . 276 

Received (chapter 83, section 13, Revised Laws) . . 1 

Pending December 1, 1916 416 

1,676 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1915 . . 18 

New applications December 1, 1915, to December 1, 1916 . 76 

94 

Disposition as follows : — 

Discharged 52 

Discharge refused 10 

Applications withdrawn 6 

Pending December 1, 1916 26 

94 

After-care. 

Pending December 1, 1915 53 

New cases December 1, 1915, to December 1, 1916 . . 106 

159 

Closed 83 

Pending December 1, 1916 76 

159 

Support. 
Current financial prosperity is evidenced in the amount 
received this year from relatives in support of unsettled depend- 
ent children, an increase from $2,904.64 to $4,659.49 being 
shown. 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 173 

During the year the total amount received for the sup- 
port of settled children from the overseers of the poor was 
$21,937.16. 

Non-Support Proceedings. 

During the year ending November 30, 1916, the sum of 
$8,087.54 was collected from parents of children or other 
sources by means of court proceedings brought under Statutes 
of 1911, chapter 456, or through agreements entered into to 
avoid court action. 

This amount is in addition to the sum set forth in the section 
entitled "Support," and represents the amount obtained by the 
special agent of the Board. 

Adoptions. 

At the beginning of the year there were 19 applications for 
children for adoption awaiting investigation. During the year 
138 new applications have been received. Twenty-two of these 
have been withdrawn, 7 disapproved without investigation and 
115 investigated. 

Thirty-nine of this number have been disapproved and 76 
approved, and there are now 13 applications awaiting in- 
vestigation. 

Fifty-four children have been placed in the 76 approved 
homes. 

Fifty-six children have been adopted during the year, 37 
girls and 19 boys, the oldest child adopted being a girl nine- 
teen years of age, and the youngest a girl two and a half years 
of age. There are now 70 children on trial for adoption. 

One application came from Connecticut, three from Maine, 
one from PJiode Island, one from New Hampshire, and the 
others from within the Commonwealth. 



174 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



175 



Summary of Children under Three Years of Age in Custody of the Board. 





Dependent 


Neglected 




Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Boys 


Girls 


Totals 


Number December 1, 1915 .... 

Received December 1, 1915, to November 30, 
1916. 
Total number in charge 

Number transferred to the Department for 

Children over three years of age. 
Number discharged 


168 
119 


148 
107 


316 
226 


43 
31 


49 

27 


92 
58 


287 
70 
48 


255 
50 
52 


542 
120 
100 


74 

24 

8 


76 

27 

5 


150 
51 
13 


Number December 1, 1916 .... 


169 


153 


322 


42 


44 


86 



176 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17, 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



177 



Disposition of Children over Three Years of Age in Custody of the Board 
during the Year ending November 80, 1916. 



Girls 



Boys 



In homes receiving wages 

In homes, free of expense to State . .... 

In homes, clothing only provided 

In homes, board and clothing provided 

In institutions 

Married 

In United States service ....... 

Whereabouts unknown 

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Died 

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Transferred to Industrial School for Girls 

Committed to Concord Reformatory 

Committed to Reformatory for Women 

Adopted ; 

Discharged 

Total number in custody of the Board during the official year 



278 


480 


183 


386 


133 


34 


1,432 


1,931 


289 


281 


22 


5 


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21 


24 


159 


2,361 


3,297 


12 


21 


85 


97 


- 


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28 
122 



2,617 



17 
253 



3,716 



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31 


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55 


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35 


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4 


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135 


140 


129 


101 



1 Discharges for adoption and transfers to industrial schools are not included in this table. 



178 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



179 






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180 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Disposition of Children held in Custody of the Board on Temporary Mittimi, 
pending Further Order of the Court. 





Pending 
Decem- 
ber 1, 
1915 


Re- 
ceived 
during 

the 
Year 


Perma- 
nently 
com- 
mitted 


Bailed 
or sur- 
rendered 
to 
Court 


Sent to 
Indus- 
trial 
Schools 


Died 


Pending 
Decem- 
ber 1, 
1916 


Neglected 
Delinquent 
Wayward . 


37 
7 
1 


123 

97 

3 


58 
10 


61 

77 

3 


9 


1 


40 
8 
1 


Totals . 


45 


223 


68 


141 


9 


1 


- 49 





Localities from which New Children were received. 








Neg- 
lected 


Delin- 
quent 


Wayward 


Under Revised Laws, 
Chapter 83 




a 
a> 
a 

c3 

a 

P-I 


>> 

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a 

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>> 
u 

u 

a 

i 


a 
p 

o 
o 

m 


pi 
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o 

o 


a™ 


to 

CO 

1 
s 


Abington 

Adams . 

Amherst 

Arlington 

Athol . 

Attleboro 

Barnstable 

Bedford 

Beverly 

Billerica 

Blackstone 

Boston . 

Bridgewater 

Brockton 

Brookfield 

Cambridge 

Chelsea 

Concord 

Danvers 

Dedham 

Douglas 

Everett 

Fall River 

Falmouth 

Fitchburg 

Foxborough 

Framingham 

Franklin 

Georgetown 

Greenfield 

Haverhill 

Hingham 

Holyoke 

Hudson 

Hull . 

Ipswich 

Lanesboroug! 

Lawrence 

Lee 

Leeds . 

Leicester 

Lenox . 

Leominster 


i 






1 
1 
1 

1 

2 
3 
2 
4 
2 

17 

9 

1 
4 

4 
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1 

1 

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1 
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5 

5 
6 

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1 

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1 

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1 

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1 

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1 

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1 
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55 

5 

2 
3 


2 
2 

4 


1 
3 

1 

112 
1 
3 

7 
12 

1 

3 

1 

5 

6 
2 

12 

5 
3 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



181 



Localities from which New Children were received — Concluded. 











Neg- 
lected 


Delin- 
quent 


Wayward 


Under Revised Laws, 
Chapter 83 




a 

B 


(- 

o 

a 
S 
& 


-*> 



§ 
B 

Ph 


>> 

U 

03 

u 

a 
a 


03 

a 

u 


>> 

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a 


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to 


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CM 

a 
.2 

'•+3 

8 

to 


03 SO 

is 

to 


eo 

CO 

C 

.2 
8 

CO 


Leverett 

Littleton 

Lowell . 

Lunenburg 

Lynn . 

Maiden . 

Marblehead 

Marlborough 

Medfield 

Medford 

Melrose . 

Middleborouf 

Milford . 

Millbury 

Millis . 

Milton . 

Natick . 

Needham 

New Bedforc 

Newburyporl 

Newton 

North Adam 

North Attleb 

Northamptoi 

Norwell 

Orange* . 

Oxford . 

Peabody 

Pittsfield 

Quincy . 

Reading 

Revere . 

Salem . 

Sandisfield 

Saugus . 

Sharon . 

Sheffield 

Sherborn 

Somerset 

Somerville 

Southampton 

Southbridge 

Springfield 

Stoughton 

Sutton . 

Taunton 

Templeton 

Tewksbury 

Townsend 

Wakefield 

Waltham 

Wareham 

Watertown 

Wayland 

Webster 

West borough 

Westfield 

Williamstown 

Winthrop 

Woburn 

Worcester 

Yarmouth 


?h 

b 

3 

orou? 

i 


lh 




6 

13 

3 

2 
2 

11 
11 
5 

8 
2 
3 

3 

1 
3 

7 

4 

20 
2 
2 
4 

5 

1 
4 

3 
5 


5 

1 

4 

9 

1 
2 

1 

5 
1 

4 
4 


1 

1 
1 

1 
1 

2 

1 

— 

1 

1 
1 

4 


i 
i 

i 
i 

3 


- 


i 


- 


1 

1 
1 

1 

3 
3 

2 
1 

1 

1 
2 

1 

1 
18 

3 

1 

1 

10 


'- 


1 

3 

8 
4 

5 

2 
3 

3 

3 

1 

22 
2 
1 
1 

2 
1 

1 

1 

5 

8 


Totals .... 


229 


123 


41 


97 


3 


3 


1 


135 


8 


276 



182 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Licensed Boarding Houses for Infants. 

During the last official year 381 licenses to maintain board- 
ing houses for infants were granted by the Board under the 
provisions of section 2, chapter 83, Revised Laws, in 71 cities 
and towns, in addition to the 360 licenses in force at the expi- 
ration of the previous year; 322 licenses expired, by the one- 
year limitation; 74 were revoked, — 64 on account of change of 
residence, 3 for neglect of infants, 2 by death, 2 for violation of 
statutes and 3 for miscellaneous reasons; and 345 licenses, per- 
mitting the boarding of 717 infants in 71 cities and towns, re- 
mained in force November 30, 1916. These represent the licensed 
homes not only of infants supported by the Commonwealth, 
but of those placed out by parents and many private agencies. 

The following table shows the number of licenses issued, the 
number of cities and towns where licensees reside, the number 
of licenses expired and revoked, the whole number in force, 
etc., for the year ending November 30, 1916, and twenty-four 
preceding years : — 





o 

3 
32 
02 

m 

o 

33 

a 

o 


a 



H 
"o 

o 

,o 

S 

3 


O 

"3 

1 

s 

c 
8 
3 


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o 
M 

o 

g 

o 

13 


o 
a 

1 

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02 

o 

03 

C 
J 


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o 
a; 

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02 
O 
02 

C 

o 
.2 


T3 
o 
> 

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p 

02 

-^> 
U 

K 

3 


o 

-2 

S-t 

O 

o 
o 


-3 

1 

c3 

33 

a 
"3 


Year ending September 30. 




















1892 


127 


34 


- 


5 


122 


9 


972 


398 


272 


1893 


199 


39 


155 


16 


139 


20 


1,800 


763 


374 


1894 


173 


42 


120 


32 


159 


49 


2,997 


1,156 


382 


1895 


182 


50 


134 


52 


155 


68 


2,701 


1,125 


429 


1896 . . . . 


154 


39 


135 


32 


142 


57 


2,972 


1,235 


483 


1897 


189 


43 


123 


42 


166 


38 


3,343 


1,376 


549 


1898 


209 


43 


150 


48 


177 


25 


3,075 


1,355 


630 


1899 


222 


43 


155 


60 


184 


43 


3,269 


1,347 


513 


1900 


228 


41 


157 


59 


196 


19 


3,117 


1,337 


528 


1901 


258 


44 


174 


52 


228 


23 


3,525 


1,395 


601 


1902 


271 


48 


191 


58 


250 


8 


3,176 


1,384 


557 


1903 . .... 


253 


47 


221 


62 


220 


12 


3,111 


1,319 


572 


1904 


276 


48 


197 


43 


256 


24 


3,751 


1,543 


685 


1905 


285 


47 


236 


43 


262 


7 


3,737 


1,704 


674 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



183 





T3 

o 

03 

m 

CO 

o 

co 

a 
o 
u 

Hi 


03 

i 

s 


73 
u 

'3. 
a> 
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a 

3 


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o> 
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co 
a 

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a 
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o 

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o 

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a 

Ch 
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(h 

o 

a 

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o 

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c 


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a 

c3 


Year ending Noiember 30. 




















1906 


400 


51 


295 


66 


301 


15 


4,926 


1,942 


718 


1907 


373 


56 


271 


62 


341 


10 


4,712 


1,925 


817 


1908 ; 


442 


59 


311 


87 


385 


18 


5,370 


2,215 


896 


1909 


411 


62 


351 


70 


375 


20 


4,642 


2,272 


880 


1910 


410 


60 


350 


64 


371 


30 


4,459 


2,099 


800 


1911 


362 


64 


350 


39 


344 


17 


4,025 


2,078 


790 


1912 


373 


68 


308 


60 


349 


23 


4,622 


2,103 


891 


1913 


405 


64 


323 


48 


383 


24 


5,047 


2,263 


963 


1914 . . . . 


391 


61 


358 


56 


360 


33 


4,923 


2,136 


934 


1915 . . . . . 


388 


63 


326 


62 


360 


20 


4,928 


2,212 


916 


1916 


381 


71 


322 


74 


345 


15 


6,047 


2,367 


1,066 



The State nurses have visited 1,763 infants, under the super- 
vision of societies and private parties. 



184 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



185 



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187 









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188 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17, 



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Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



189 



m**t»o»-i*j<eo(MeOT-i^i-4<Mi-ic<)i-i i*-i I I ii-ii-i 



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190 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



191 



.8 



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• 

Infants 


Under one month 

One month but under two 

Two months but under three 

Three months but under four 

Four months but under five 

Five months but under six 

Six months but under twelve 

Twelve months but under two years 


c 

1 





192 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 1' 



Licensed Lying-in Hospitals. 

Licenses in force December 1, 1915 (in 87 cities and towns) . . 209 

Expired during the year 109 

Surrendered before expiration 16 

Revoked 

125 

Continuing in force 84 

New issues 24- 

Reissues 114 

Licenses in force November 30, 1916 (in 86 cities and towns) . . 222 

Licensees November 30, 1916: — 

Corporations 85 

Physicians 42 

Registered nurses 26 

Overseers of the poor 10 

Other persons s .... 59 

Total 222 

One hundred thirty-seven visits of inspection of lying-in 
hospitals were made during the year ending November 30, 1916. 

The regulations for lying-in hospitals were revised February 
7, 1916, by the Board. The only substantial change was made 
in Rule 9 of the regulations. Under the new Rule 9 all cases 
of "sore eyes" in infants must be reported to the State De- 
partment of Health only. Rule 9 now reads as follows: — 

Should one or both eyes of an infant at any time become 
inflamed, swollen and red and show an unnatural discharge, a 
licensee shall, when the infant is discharged from the hospital, 
send notice in writing to the State Department of Health within 
six hours after such discharge, stating whether the infant is 
discharged cured or uncured, and stating the city or town and 
street and number to which the infant is to be taken. 

Three hundred ninety-eight notices of the discharge from 
lying-in hospitals of infants who have had "sore eyes" were 
received during the year. These notices were received from 
35 hospitals having a total of 8,357 births. Upon these figures 
"sore eyes" develop in 4.67+ per cent of the births in those 
hospitals. The following table shows in detail the reports 
received from lying-in hospitals in accordance with Rule 9 for 
the period December 1, 1915, to November 30, 1916: — 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



193 



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S. D. H., silver nitrate and 25 per cent argyrol 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

25 per cent argyrol . . . • . 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

20 per cent argyrol 

S. D. Hi, silver nitrate 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

S. D. H., silver nitrate 

20 per cent argyrol 

S. D. K., silver nitrate 

Protargyrol, 20 per cent 

Sophol, 5 per cent 


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Boston Lying-in Hospital 

Burbank Hospital, Fitchburg 

Cushing Hospital, Parker Hill Avenue, Boston 

Fall River City Hospital 

Florence Crittenton Homes 

Franklin County Hospital, Greenfield 

Frost Hospital, Chelsea 

Gale Hospital, Haverhill 

Goddard Hospital, Brockton 

Hale Hospital, Haverhill 

Haverhill City Hospital 

Holyoko City Hospital 

House of Mercy, Pittsfield 

Josiah B. Thomas Hospital, Peabody 

Lawrence General Hospital 

Lowell Corporation Hospital 

Lowell General Hospital . . • . 

Lynn Hospital . . * 



194 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 





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Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



195 



Tuition of Children under the Care and Control of 

the Board. 

Section 4 of chapter 44 of the Revised Laws, as amended by 
chapter 78 of the General Acts of 1915, provides that, "For 
the tuition in the public schools in any city or town of a child 
between the ages of five and fifteen years who shall be placed 
elsewhere than in his own home by the state board of charity 
... or kept under the control of . . . said board in said city 
or town, the commonwealth shall pay to said city or town . . . 
seventy-five cents for each week of five days, or major part 
thereof, of attendance of every such child in the public schools. 
For the transportation to and from a public school of- any child 
whose tuition is payable by the commonwealth . . . the com- 
monwealth . . . shall pay to the city or town furnishing such 
transportation, for each week of &ve days or major part thereof, 
an amount equal to the average amount for each child paid by 
said city or town per week for the transportation of children 
to and from school over the route by which such child is con- 
veyed." 

Under the operation of this law bills received from 231 cities 
and towns for the tuition and transportation of 3,076 children, 
amounting to $61,795.89, — viz., schooling, $57,814.05; trans- 
portation, $3,981.84, — were audited by the Board and paid 
by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth during the last official 
year, as follows: — 



Cities and Towns 


Number 

of 
Children 


Number of 

Weeks' 
Schooling 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 
Transpor- 
tation 


Total Cost 


Abington ...... 

Acton ...... 

Agawam . . . . 

Amesbury . 

Amherst 

Andover 

Arlington 

Ashfield 

Ashland ..... 

Athol 

Attleboro 

Ayer . . ' . 

Barre ...... 

Becket 

Bedford 

Belchertown .... 

Bellingham 

Belmont 


7 

3 

1 

8 

29 

22 

19 

4 

10 

33 

3 

8 

4 

14 

3 

32 
5 
5 


142 

68 

38 

232 

662 

543 

646 

565 

233 

1,012 

58 

219 

141 

236 

101 

751 

87 

60 


$106 00 

50 50 

28 00 

171 00 

487 80 

399 25 

477 00 

72 95 

171 25 

746 50 

43 50 
162 75 
104 25 
175 50 

74 75 

547 75 

63 25 

44 00 


$20 00 
44 88 

27 50 

32 75 

11 40 

85 00 

5 50 

57 00 

5 00 


$126 00 

95 38 

28 00 

198 50 

487 80 

432 00 

477 00 

72 95 

182 65 

831 50 

49 00 

219 75 

104 25 

175 50 

74 75 

547 75 

68 25 

44 00 



196 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities and Towns 


of 


Weeks' 


Transpor- 


Total Cost 




Children 


Schooling 


tation 




Berkley 


14 


328 


$241 50 


_ 


$241 50 


Berlin . 










11 


182 


134 00 


$12 50 


146 50 


Bernardston 










8 


183 


134 75 


72 00 


206 75 


Beverly 










20 


518 


380 00 


- 


380 00 


Blackstone 










1 


30 


22 50 


- 


22 50 


Blandford 










5 


124 


90 50 


- 


90 50 


Boston 










63 


1,587 


1,211 05 


4 00 


1,215 05 


Bourne 










19 


389 


239 25 


- 


239 25 


Boxford 










7 


207 


229 92 


- 


229 92 


Braintree 










10 


277 


204 25 


- 


204 25 


Brewster 










7 


234 


177 50 


200 10 


377 60 


Bridgewater 










11 


366 


271 00 


87 50 


358 50 


Brimfield 










13 


470 


346 00 


212 00 


558 00 


Brockton 










24 


528 


387 00 


- 


387 00 


Brookfield 










9 


256 


189 00 


- 


189 00 


Buckland 










3 


62 


46 00 


- 


46 00 


Cambridge 










78 


2,145 


1,563 00 


- 


1,563 00 


Canton 










13 


317 


235 75 


9 00 


244 75 


Charlemont 










10 


241 


185 61 


- 


185 61 


Charlton 










5 


87 


62 75 


- 


62 75 


Chatham 










6 


106 


77 50 


— 


77 50 


Chelmsford 










13 


310 


229 50 


- 


229 50 


Chelsea 










14 


474 


329 50 


- 


329 50 


Chester 










12 


309 


227 25 


- 


227 25 


Chesterfield 










4 


41 


32 49 


- 


32 49 


Chicopee 










11 


201 


148 50 


9 00 


157 50 


Clinton 










2 


34 


24 50 


— 


24 50 


Colrain 










13 


283 


206 75 


- 


206 75 


Concord 










10 


287 


213 25 


42 75 


256 00 


Conway 










16 


435 


321 75 


30 00 


351 75 


Cummingtoi 


1 








15 


390 


304 62 


44 50 


349 12 


Dalton 










5 


156 


116 00 


— 


116 00 


Dana . 










1 


3 


1 75 


- 


1 75 


Danvers 










21 


542 


401 50 


- 


401 50 


Dedham 










34 


819 


615 87 


- 


615 87 


Deerfield 










4 


134 


99 00 


- 


99 00 


Dighton 










3 


98 


72 50 


- 


72 50 


Douglas 










9 


240 


177 00 


- 


177 00 


Dover . 










1 


14 


11 44 


7 00 


18 44 


Dracut 










20 


602 


444 50 


60 75 


505 25 


Dudley 










3 


74 


54 00 


- 


54 00 


Duxbury 










9 


226 


166 50 


8 00 


174 50 


East Bridgewater 






13 


426 


313 50 


30 00 


343 50 


East Longmeadow 






4 


59 


42 75 


- 


42 75 


Easthampton 






5 


102 


51 00 


- 


51 00 


Easton 








17 


532 


362 75 


— 


362 75 


Enfield 










59 


1,539 


1,136 75 


- 


1,136 75 


Essex . 










4 


119 


87 75 


- 


87 75 


Everett 










14 


380 


280 00 


- 


280 00 


Falmouth 










3 


103 


75 75 


154 50 


230 25 


Fitchburg 










8 


155 


113 25 


60 68 


173 93 


Foxborough 








13 


358 


263 50 


- 


263 50 


Framingham 








52 


1,345 


995 25 


— 


995 25 


Franklin 








11 


377 


279 25 


13 50 


292 75 


Freetown 










2 


36 


26 00 


— 


26 00 


Gardner 










7 


224 


165 00 


- 


165 00 


Georgetown 










36 


856 


633 00 


260 25 


893 25 


Gill . 










7 


122 


88 00 


- 


88 00 


Gloucester 










2 


67 


49 75 


- 


49 75 


Goshen 










4 


59 


45 37 


- 


45 37 


Granby 










8 


180 


132 50 


69 60 


202 10 


Granville 










5 


126 


94 00 


- 


94 00 


Greenfield 










15 


399 


293 75 


- 


293 75 


Greenwich 










9 


134 


99 00 


24 50 


123 50 


Hamilton 










1 


38 


28 00 


27 00 


55 00 


Hanover 










9 


145 


106 75 


29 00 


135 75 


Hardwick 










4 


141 


104 25 


117 03 


221 28 


Harwich 










4 


136 


100 00 


- 


100 00 


Haverhill 










16 


268 


198 25 


- 


198 25 


Hawley 










25 


667 


491 25 


- 


491 25 


Heath . 










2 


17 


12 75 


- 


12 75 


Hinsdale 










21 


358 


266 50 


- 


266 50 


Holbrook 










. 5 


195 


145 00 


— 


145 00 


Holland 










3 


118 


79 50 


- 


79 50 


Holliston 










12 


349 


259 25 


7 20 


266 45 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



197 





Number 


Number of 


Cost of 
Schooling 


Cost of 




Cities and Towns 


of 


Weeks' 


Transpor- 


Total Cost 




Children 


Schooling 


tation 




Hopkinton 


43 


1,226 


$905 50 


$162 80 


$1,068 30 


Lawrence . 








7 


149 


110 75 


— 


110 75 


Leominster . 








11 


351 


259 00 


4 00 


263 00 


Lexington . 








12 


342 


252 50 


5 70 


258 20 


Leyden 








12 


308 


227 00 


- 


227 00 


Littleton 








1 


28 


21 00 


_ 


21 00 


Lowell 








72 


2,059 


1,358 50 


- 


1,358 50 


Ludlow 








8 


202 


148 50 


- 


148 50 


Lunenburg . 








2 


72 


53 00 


- 


53 00 


Lynn . 








50 


1,083 


797 00 


12 50 


809 50 


Lynnfield . 








6 


142 


104 50 


- 


104 50 


Maiden 








42 


1,046 


770 50 


- 


770 50 


Mansfield . 








5 


52 


39 00 


— 


39 00 


Marlborough 








19 


418 


313 97 


10 00 


323 97 


Marshfield . 








5 


74 


37 00 


17 50 


54 50 


Mattapoisett 








5 


163 


119 75 


- 


119 75 


Maynard 








1 


13 


9 75 


— 


9 75 


Medfield . 








7 


164 


120 50 


- 


120 50 


Medford 








69 


1,688 


1,242 75 


- 


1,242 75 


Medway 








40 


1,030 


767 25 


179 25 


946 50 


Melrose 








35 


799 


603 77 


— 


603 77 


Mendon 








4 


144 


106 00 


36 00 


142 00 


Merrimac . 








9 


316 


232 50 


19 00 


251 50 


Methuen 








8 


220 


164 25 


- 


164 25 


Middleborough 








40 


1,057 


778 75 


2 60 


781 35 


Middlefield . 








11 


315 


234 00 


- 


234 00 


Middleton . 








9 


218 


161 00 


26 00 


187 00 


Milford 








30 


676 


644 50 


- 


644 50 


Milton 








4 


81 


60 75 


35 75 


96 50 


Monson 








20 


569 


419 25 


46 88 


466 13 


Montague . 








3 


116 


85 50 


— 


85 50 


Nahant 








2 


56 


41 50 


13 00 


54 50 


Natick 








42 


1,176 


866 50 


32 50 


899 00 


Needham . 








2 


12 


8 50 


_ 


8 50 


New Bedford 








4 


129 


95 25 


- 


95 25 


New Salem . 








17 


490 


363 25 


9 00 


372 25 


Newbury 








11 


257 


188 25 


• 30 00 


218 25 


Newburyport 








4 


152 


112 00 


9 50 


121 50 


Newton 








17 


385 


284 75 


- 


284 75 


North Adams 








2 


76 


56 00 


- 


56 00 


North Brookfield 








17 


301 


220 25 


- 


220 25 


North Reading 








2 


18 


13 50 


4 50 


18 00 


Northampton 








6 


183 


134 75 


- 


134 75 


Northborough 








5 


50 


37 50 


3 00 


40 50 


Northbridge 








3 


92 


68 00 


- 


68 00 


Norton 








19 


433 


317 50 


35 00 


352 50 


Norwell 










20 


529 


390 00 


152 50 


542 50 


Norwood 










13 


305 


225 75 


10 00 


235 75 


Oakham 










4 


55 


40 75 


- 


40 75 


Orange 










17 


505 


372 75 


17 00 


389 75 


Palmer 










30 


877 


643 75 


65 75 


709 50 


Peabody 










23 


608 


448 25 


29 00 


477 25 


Pelham 










17 


401 


293 25 


— 


293 25 


Pembroke 










14 


522 


387 50 


- 


387 50 


Peru . 










1 


23 


16 75 


_ 


16 75 


Petersham 










1 


4 


3 00 


2 84 


5 84 


Phillipston 










1 


36 


26 50 


_ 


26 50 


Pittsfield 










11 


191 


140 25 


_ 


140 25 


Plainfield 










8 


252 


196 30 


_ 


196 30 


Plainville 










6 


175 


113 50 


_ 


113 50 


Plympton 










7 


162 


120 50 


- 


120 50 


Prescott 










23 


633 


466 25 


_ 


466 25 


Quincy 










46 


1,461 


1,080 25 


- 


1,080 25 


Randolph 










25 


672 


499 50 


- 


499 50 


Raynham 










1 


19 


13 75 


- 


13 75 


Reading 










18 


497 


340 00 


28 00 


368 00 


Rehoboth 










10 


247 


181 25 


_ 


181 25 


Revere 










9 


212 


156 00 


_ 


156 00 


Rockland 










10 


239 


177 25 


_ 


177 25 


Rowe . 










13 


384 


289 44 


33 38 


322 82 


Rowley 










6 


106 


77 26 


9 50 


86 76 


Royalston 










18 


520 


383 50 


- 


383 50 


Salem . 










7 


74 


54 00 


- 


54 00 


Salisbury 










9 


170 


125 00 


- 


125 00 


Sandwich 










5 


180 


133 75 


- 


133 75 



198 



TATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



Number 


Number :; 


3osf :: 
S : b Doling 


Cost of 




. .. . . Children 


Weeks 

Schooling 


tation 


Total Cost 


S ;■■:;- 


15 


2S9 


$206 25 




181 85 


y :^:ii 








4 


124 


91 00 


- 


91 00 


Sharon 








2 


72 


:: :: 


SIS 00 


71 00 


She'.burre , 








3 


85 


12 :■ 


19 00 


SI 25 


Sherbom 








S 


140 


:."i :: 


_ 


104 00 


Shirley 








2 


"S 


57 50 


57 72 


115 22 


Shntest ary 








5 


3S 


27 : : 


_ 


27 50 


Somerville . 








3d 


»1 


733 56 


_ 


733 55 


Sooth Hadfcsy 








5 


160 


117 50 


If 35 


135 75 


S:utn; ::;u;_ 








11 


838 


: : ; : : 


--: :: 


213 00 


7 [ f p : e i 








2 


37 


:- 75 


- 


87 75 


v::--gfield . 








25 


595 


433 00 


- 


433 00 


v:iria3i 








15 


456 


337 50 


— 


337 50 


Stoagfafeon . 








24 


613 


452 75 


_ 


452 75 


S : : — 








6 


45 


31 75 


- 


11 "- 


3fa : nidge . 








1 


17 


12 25 


-- 35 


16 50 


Sodt ary 








3 


72 


53 75 


:: :: 


36 75 


SaBodezfand 








6 


141 


ios -■ 


42 30 


146 05 


5-m:-.- 








8 


256 


192 00 


- 


192 00 










8 


197 


145 50 


- 


146 50 


_-i~Ton 








30 


K2 


651 00 


- 


:■:: :: 


Ibatpletan . 








11 


SBfi 


211 50 


- 


211 50 


_r— ksbtiry . 








4 


14S 


109 50 


7 00 


lit •:•: 


_ :r5-eld . 








: 


183 


135 25 


- 


135 25 


_:~n5e::;l . 








3 


64 


18 35 


If IS 


S9 00 


Truro . 








B 


125 


93 75 


- 


;: 75 


-;'::;::::;:i 








5 


53 


39 25 


13 25 


ia :: 


- yrmgham , 








1 


21 


15 75 


_ 


'-' 75 


Upton . 








11 


':'. 


323 :: 


43 20 


: : : :: 


Wakefield 








59 


: 58f 


~: 


_ 


:-;: 75 


fries . 








2 


-- 


53 00 


_ 


n :: 


Walpoie 








i 


113 


S3 85 


S 40 


-1 :5 


akham 








12 


320 


845 n 


- 


'.-/-. 81 


Ware . 








IS 


552 


407 51 


47 50 


455 00 


ferren 








2 


31 


23 25 


46 13 


-:; :S 


Warwk* . 








2 


20 


14 :: 


_ 


14 00 


Wasfah^tan 








1 


190 


:-:. :: 


_ 


14: :: 


Watertown . 








17 


349 


263 11 


- 


263 11 


Wayfend . 








27 


58fl 


439 00 


214 75 


653 75 










9 


:s: 


»7 :: 


23 00 


::: :: 


e=t ~r:-:>de:- 








6 


134 


::: :: 




::■: :: 


fest Newbury 








11 


220 


161 00 


13 00 


:74 :: 


Wesl Springfield 








2 


25 


18 75 




if 75 


'•est: :r:urh 








12 


333 


845 n 


94 50 


340 25 


----i ~ . 








15 


432 


31S 00 


1 98 


319 98 


r::i::i::r: 








18 


334 


243 -50 


- 


243 50 


^~es-:~ 








16 


499 


188 ": 


1-54 72 


523 47 


Wesfport . 








g 


74 


54 50 


- 


54 50 


symootii . 








17 


486 


if: :: 


- 


v-:. :: 


Wbatety 








: 


34 


25 50 


_ 


25 50 


Whitman 








44 


1.163 


137 :: 


2S :: 


385 X 


~~-" ---.'nKn . 








15 


184 


133 50 


50 


-i-k '.'. 


".'.-.— abnr g 








:: 


610 


454 04 


_ 


454 04 


miamstown 








-: 


151 


145 H 


- 


145 08 


; 








17 


163 


: _ : :: 


_ 


270 00 


W-lrciendon 








17 


435 


319 75 


--'-. :: 


E:S --5 


Winebestez 








:: 


I.':':-: 


9S3 00 


- 


:\\ :: 


Winthrop . 








10 


457 


167 75 


- 


3 ' 75 


VT * 








49 


: 23! 


75 


- 


. : 75 


Worcester . 








14 


349 


853 85 


- 


259 25 


Worthingtan 








4 


58 


55 34 


— 


55 34 


Wrentham . 








: 


38 


::« :: 


32 30 


-.-. V. 


YjmwwmUi . 








l 


36 


26 50 


" 


26 50 


7 :- ::".-: 2cl ::~e= and tc-Tm; 


\ |7| 


-\ lis 


i" \'--- '.1 


>-: ;s: \-. 


I 1 * : Vr 





Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



199 



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200 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

The expenses for the fiscal year December 1, 1915, to No- 
vember 30, 1916, were as follows: — 

Expenses of the Board $22,914 52 

Division of State Adult Poor . 82,315 81 

Division of State Minor Wards 96,808 75 

Transportation of State paupers 13,949 92 

Support of indigent and neglected children .... 560,000 00 

Support of pauper infants 59,000 00 

Tuition of State children 61,795 89 

Auxiliary visitors 209 21 

Support of sick State paupers 89,999 50 

Burial of State paupers 7,999 74 

Temporary aid of State paupers 149,999 92 

Mothers' aid 299,998 78 

Dangerous diseases 79,999 83 

Penikese Hospital 28,228 61 

Annual report ' . 2,793 77 



Total $1,556,014 25 



DETAILS. • 

EXPENSES OF THE BOARD. 

Salaries: 

Robert W. Kelso, Secretary $4,000 00 

Louise S. Kolb, Assistant to Secretary 1,300 00 

Harry H. Pray, Examining Visitor of Institutions . . 2,000 00 

Amy F. Acton, Chief Inspector of Incorporated Charities . 1,600 00 

Alice M. Mclntire, Inspector of Incorporated Charities . 1,120 00 

Caroline J. Cook, Inspector of Incorporated Charities . 1,384 44 

Marion H. Naylor, Stenographer 941 67 

Isa M. Dempsey, Stenographer 800 00 

Augusta Hawley, Chief Accountant 1,000 00 

Jennie I. Gurney, Statistical Clerk 733 34 

Mary E. Callahan, Clerk 800 00 

Annie G. Carpenter, Clerk 850 00 

Florence G. Dickson, Clerk 800 00 

Matilda V. HaU, Clerk 800 00 

Ethel S. Greene, Clerk 800 00 

Mary B. Crotty, Clerk ........ 100 00 

Emma G. Downing, Clerk 108 06 

Marie J. Duggan, Clerk 174 19 

Amount carried forward . $19,311 70 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



201 



Amount brought forward $19,311 70 

Caroline E. Heermann, Clerk ....... 30 00 

Margaret D. MacDonald, Clerk .' 308 33 

Katherine G. McBride, Clerk 15 00 

Nora C. McSweeney, Clerk . 100 00 

Georgia M. Reynolds, Clerk ....... 20 00 

Sara L. Shure, Clerk 200 00 

Emily Udy, Clerk 10 00 

Maude A. Whitney, Clerk . . ... . . 93 55 

Total salaries $20,088 58 

Traveling expenses of members 491 24 

Other traveling expenses : 

Robert W. Kelso ...... $139 57 

Harry H. Pray 312 12 

Amy F. Acton 50 11 

Alice M. Mclntire . 36 72 

Caroline J. Cook 122 40 

660 92 

Printing 331 99 

Postage 598 83 

Stationery and office expense ....... 623 96 

Telephone and telegraph 27 99 

Publications . 31 06 

Assistance 19 63 

Extra service 34 00 

Miscellaneous 6 32 

Total ........... $22,914 52 

DIVISION OF STATE ADULT POOR. 

Salaries: 

Frank W. Goodhue, Superintendent $3,000 00 



Subdivision of Indoor Poor. 
Frederic L. Kelley, Superintendent's Assistant 
Francis Bardwell, Inspector of Almshouses . 
Edward F. Morgan, Settlement Examiner . 
Arthur C. Briggs, Transportation Officer 
John J. Connell, Transportation Officer 
George S. Dubois, Transportation Officer 
Clarke S. Gould, Transportation Officer 
H. Aurora Hill, Transportation Officer . 

Amount carried forward .... 





2,000 00 




2,000 00 




1,700 00 




1,048 61 




269 50 




1,100 00 




975 00 




574 19 



$12,667 30 



202 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Amount brought forward S12,667 30 

James H. Quigley, Transportation Officer .... 900 00 

Mary J. Ross, Transportation Officer " 211 50 

Flora E. Burton, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 1,000 00 

Ruth A. Beebe, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 1,000 00 

Mary G. CunnifT, Visitor for Maternity Cases at State 

Infirmary 1,000 00 

Archie A. Ashley, Visitor 1,500 00 

Roy D. Merchant, Visitor . . . . . . . 1,200 00 

Edward J. McDonough, Visitor 1,376 71 

Gerard A. Halpin, Stenographer 209 68 

James B. Kerrigan, Stenographer 534 13 

Lauretta M. Moran, Stenographer 800 00 

Lillian GafTey, Stenographer 800 00 

Arthur L. Stevenson, Clerk 900 00 

Margaret E. O'Connell, Clerk 800 00 

James J. O'Toole, Clerk 900 00 

Subdivision of Outdoor Poor. 
George B. Tufts, Deputy Superintendent . . . . 
Willard D. Tripp, Visitor-at-large and Examiner 
Elizabeth F. Moloney, Supervisor of Aid to Dependent 

Mothers 

Edward Hitchcock, M.D., Medical Visitor .... 
Joseph W. Proctor, M.D., Medical Visitor .... 
Morton E. Cummings, M.D., Medical Visitor 

G. Arthur Bodwell, Visitor 

Lila C. Crapo, Visitor 

James H. Cunningham, Visitor 

Lillian F. Foss, Visitor . . . • 

John B. Gallagher, Visitor 

Frederick F. Green, Visitor . 

William Healey, Visitor . . 

John W. Henderson, Visitor 

William J. Hinchcliffe, Visitor 

William Hopewell, Visitor 

Esther R. Kaufman, Visitor 

Monica M. Keating, Visitor 

Louis R. Lipp, Visitor 

Mary A. Mullowney, Visitor 

Margaret A. Murphy, Visitor 

Amount carried forward $53,191 00 



2,000 00 


1,800 00 


1,800 00 


2,000 00 


2,000 00 


100 00 


1,283 05 


1,000 00 


1,500 00 


1,000 00 


1,303 89 


1,303 89 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,500 00 


1,125 00 


411 28 


770 11 


1,500 00 


997 23 


997 23 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



203 



Amount brought forward $53,191 00 

Mary A. O'Neill, Visitor 333 33 

Fred J. Rice, Visitor 1,500 00 

Anna Russell, Visitor 862 02 

Annie A. McBride, Examiner 1,400 00 

Robina A. Morison, Settlement Clerk ..... 1,100 00 

Justine D. Ferris, Accountant 1,000 00 

Annette E. Barnes, Stenographer and Statistician . . 1,100 00 

Rose V. Eagan, Stenographer ........ 900 00 

Sophia S. Finkelstein, Stenographer 800 00 

May F. Fuller, Stenographer 800 00 

Winifred C. Gilbody, Stenographer 800 00 

Ellen S. Hunter, Stenographer ...... 20 00 

Margaret R. O'Connell, Stenographer 40 00 

Sadie G. Proudman, Stenographer 783 73 

Grace M. Roster, Stenographer 40 00 

Frank J. Yeager, Stenographer 725 80 

Mary C. McLain, Clerk . . 800 00 

Mary G. Shaughnessey, Clerk ...... 333 33 

Sara L. Shure, Clerk 291 67 

Alice C. Taylor, Clerk . . . . . . . . 758 33 

Herbert L. Keeble, Clerk 758 33 

Total salaries . 4 . . $68,337 54 

Printing 791 53 

Postage 848 88 

Stationery and office expenses 1,340 13 

Telephone and telegraph 860 05 

Publications 264 59 

Assistance 599 00 

Extra service 47 50 

Miscellaneous 288 57 

Traveling expenses : 

Frank W. Goodhue . . . . .- . $115 33 

William J. Hinchcliffe 138 25 

Edward F. Morgan 598 48 

William Hopewell 296 74 

Francis Bardwell 732 55 

Louis R. Lipp 503 68 

William Healey 437 21 

Joseph W. Proctor 468 47 

Edward Hitchcock 1,233 25 

John W. Henderson . . . . . . 429 13 



Amounts carried forward 



$4,953 09 $73,377 79 



204 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Amounts brought forward .... $4,953 09 $73,377 79 

Traveling expenses — concluded. 

Archie A. Ashley 262 38 

James H. Cunningham 300 96 

Fred J. Rice . . . . . . . . 130 11 

Flora E. Burton . . . . . . . 49 57 

Edward J. McDonough 114 85 

Ruth A. Beebe 302 06 

Frederick F. Green 79 64 

John B. Gallagher 765 45 

Lila C. Crapo 283 72 

Anna Russell 314 37 

G. Arthur Bodwell 206 66 

Arthur L. Stevenson . . . . . 20 39 

Lillian F. Foss 63 08 

Elizabeth F. Moloney . . . . .3199 

Mary G. CunnirT 10174 

Roy D. Merchant 159 22 

Mary A. Mullowney 110 64 

Margaret A. Murphy 167 64 

Monica M. Keating 151 45 

Morton E. Cummings 22 30 

Esther R. Kaufman 52 49 

Clarke S. Gould . * 277 69 

Mary A. O'Neill . 16 53 

8,938 02 

Total ........... $82,315 81 



DIVISION OF STATE MINOR WARDS. 

Salaries : 

James E. Fee, Superintendent . . . . . " . $4,000 00 

Subdivision of Children. 

Winifred A. Keneran, Deputy Superintendent . . . 2,000 00 

J. Arthur Colburn, Deputy Superintendent .... 1,529 88 

Lucy B. Hancock, Visitor-at-large of Boarded Children . 1,100 00 

William A. Bailey, Visitor 1,203 61 

Ruth A. Baker, Visitor 1,000 00 

Clifford B. Ballard, Visitor 377 42 

Anna H. Bartlett, Visitor 1,000 00 

Metta Bean, Visitor 1,00000 

Amount carried forward ....... $13,210 91 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 205 

Amount brought forward . . . . . . . $13,210 91 

Bertha I. Berger, Visitor 940 99 

Roswell D. Blandy, Visitor . . . . " . . . 1,500 00 

Edward W. Bowker, Visitor 1,500 00 

Emily F. Brennan, Visitor 1,000 00 

Agnes F. Brown, Visitor 800 00 

Mary R. Cady, Visitor 987 09 

Timothy J. Carey, Visitor 1,500 00 

Florence M. Carpenter, Visitor 1,000 00 

Sophia T. Cole, Visitor 1,000 00 

Katharine C. Collins, Visitor 600 00 

Anna F. Craddock, Visitor 947 78 

A. Gertrude Daley, Visitor 800 00 

G. Frederic Davis, Visitor 1,500 00 

Francis E. Deady, Visitor 804 17 

Mary T. Dwyer, Visitor 1,000 00 

Henry L. Gardner, Visitor 1,500 00 

Marion I,. Gerould, Visitor 1,000 00 

Joseph W. Grautstuck, Visitor 1,433 33 

Jennie L. Harris, Visitor 1,000 00 

Sarah M. Hayes, Visitor 800 00 

Geraldine S. Jones, Visitor 1,000 00 

Ruth Lissner, Visitor 1,000 00 

Eugenia Locke, Visitor 1,000 00 

H. Gardner Lund, Visitor . . . . . . . 976 66 

Emily M. MacDonald, Visitor 1,000 00 

Gladys G. MacDonald, Visitor . 802 22 

Joseph P. Mclntyre, Visitor ....... 1,50000 

Annie B. McNeil, Visitor ........ 800 00 

Mary F. Mooney, Visitor 1,000 00 

Harriet M. Mulry, Visitor 802 22 

Elizabeth K. Myles, Visitor 295 16 

Arthur E. Newcomb, Visitor 1,500 00 

Marion G. Noyes, Visitor 583 33 

Charlotte C. Perkins, Visitor 1,000 00 

Frederick G. Southmayd, Visitor 8 06 

Edna G. Spitz, Visitor 947 78 

James H. Taylor, Visitor 1,202 22 

Marion S. Tewksbury, Visitor 83 34 

Emma I. Thomas, Visitor 800 00 

Millie H. Tileston, Visitor ■■■''. . 1,000 00 

Benjamin B. Towne, Visitor 793 33 

Francis J. Turcotte, Visitor . 1,188 71 

Amount carried forward $54,107 30 



206 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Amount brought forward 

E. Mabel Tyler, Visitor . 
Marie I. Williams, Visitor 
James J. Winston, Visitor 
Frances H. Barry, Stenographer 
Susie L. Glynn, Stenographer . 
Florence M. Hagerty, Stenographer 
Lillian F. Hayes, Stenographer 
Anna G. Kiley, Stenographer . 
Mary T. Killion, Stenographer. 
Mary A. Murphy, Stenographer 
Alice G. O'Mealey, Stenographer 
Lillian D. Parks, Stenographer 
Casalena M. Sleeper, Stenographer 
Lucy F. Sullivan, Stenographer 
Mary J. Sullivan, Stenographer 
Alice A. Page, Chief Accountant 
Emma W. Kelley, Accountant 
Catherine E. Smith, Chief Clerk 
Mary E. Weston, File Clerk 
Lilla D. Baker, Clerk 
Alice S. Bennett, Clerk 
Florence A. Blanchard, Clerk 
Marion L. T. Bucknam, Clerk 
Nora E. Healy, Clerk 
Frances J. Love, Clerk 
Maude A. McLean, Clerk 
Anna E. Murphy, Clerk . 
Joseph E. Quinn, Transportation Officer 
Alfred B. Greene, Messenger . 
Francis X. Gunning, Messenger 



$54,107 30 


1,000 00 


800 00 


1,202 22 


235 48 


800 00 


800 00 


83 84 


900 00 


618 95 


800 00 


1,000 00 


668 29 


900 00 


800 00 


800 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


900 00 


514 64 


436 83 


850 00 


119 44 


550 00 


800 00 


800 00 


897 85 


303 41 


47 99 



Subdivision of Infants. 

Edwin F. Cummings, M.D., Medical Visitor . . . 1,700 00 

Frederick A. Burt, Special Agent 1,700 00 

Edwin R. Sparrow, Inspector of Lying-in Hospitals . . 1,500 00 

Abigail F. Barrett, Investigating Visitor . . . . 851 88 

Helen F. Horan, Investigating Visitor . . . . . 1,000 00 

Mary T. McCann, Nurse Visitor 923 39 

Elizabeth J. McDermott, Nurse Visitor .... 800 00 

S. Eleanor Merrill, Nurse Visitor 1,000 00 

Eunice A. Miller, Investigating Visitor 1,000 00 

Amount carried forward $86,211 51 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



207 



$86,211 51 


634 23 


1,000 00 


1,000 00 


700 00 


900 00 


16 13 


800 00 


121 77 


$91,383 64 


30 00 


812 86 


1,608 40 


1,741 95 


1,150 10 


25 50 


56 30 



Amount brought forward . 

Beatrice K. Quinn, Investigating Visitor 
Sarah E. Rawson, Investigating Visitor 
Annie F. Merrill, Accountant 
Marie T. Conners, Clerk . 
Georgiana C. Faden, Clerk 
Eugenie Goss, Clerk 
Georgiana M. Maheu, Clerk 
Mary R. Spooner, Office Assistant 



Total salaries 
Extra service 

Printing .... 
Postage .... 
Stationery and office expenses 
Telephone and telegraph . 
Publications 
Miscellaneous expenses 



Total $96,808 75 

TRANSPORTATION OF STATE PAUPERS. 

Traveling expenses of officers : 

George S. Dubois . . . $214 06 

Arthur C. Briggs 749 33 

Mary J. Ross ......... 115 39 

Clarke S. Gould 162 08 

James H. Quigley . . . . . . . . 510 36 

H. Aurora Hill 402 88 

John J. Connell 170 60 

Total $2,324 70 

Foreign fares 1,667 04 

Inland fares . 7,218 33 

Carriage and express 393 24 

Food and lodging 666 56 

Expenses of parole visitors 48 57 

Expenses of branch office . 200 02 

Transportation to State Infirmary 629 53 

Assistance "... 541 78 

Miscellaneous expenses 260 15 

Total $13,949 92 



208 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



INDIGENT AND NEGLECTED CHILDREN. 

Board and travel of wards $376,351 98 

Clothing 100,908 77 

Schooling and supplies 130 86 

Physicians, medicine, hospital care, etc 42,848 31 

Expenses, Charles Street Temporary Home .... 5,952 60 

Expenses, Wellesley Temporary Home 6,536 57 

Assistance and Miscellaneous 6,458 87 

Traveling expenses of visitors : 

Frederick G. Southmayd $14 35 

Henry L. Gardner 562 74 

Timothy J. Carey 389 23 

Edward W. Bowker . . . . . . . 79 56 

G. Fred Davis 626 12 

Arthur E. Newcomb 433 66 

Joseph P. Mclntyre 725 18 

Joseph W. Grautstuck 259 49 

Roswell D. Blandy 457 74 

Francis J. Turcotte 788 81 

Clifford B. Ballard 193 79 

William A. Bailey 563 34 

J. Arthur Colburn . . . . ' . . 225 73 

James H. Taylor 698 05 

James J. Winston 620 57 

James E. Fee 68 16 

H. Gardner Lund ...... 300 66 

Joseph E. Quinn 346 06 

Lucy B. Hancock 299 66 

Mary F. Mooney . . . . . . 555 26 

Geraldine S. Jones 433 94 

Jennie L. Harris . . . . . . . 256 80 

Catherine E. Smith 244 58 

Florence M. Carpenter . . . . .621 96 

Mary T. Dwyer 258 05 

Winifred A. Keneran 97 28 

Emily F. Brennan 493 56 

Ruth Lissner . 349 35 

Anna H. Bartlett 547 37 

Marion L. Gerould 510 01 

Anna E. Murphy 136 71 

Emily M. MacDonald 507 09 

Metta Bean 878 00 

Eugenia Locke 399 82 

Amounts carried forward .... $13,94268 $539,18796 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 209 

Amounts brought forward .... $13,94268 $539,18796 

Traveling expenses of visitors — concluded. 

Charlotte C. Perkins 306 45 

Ruth A. Baker 491 91 

Sophia T. Cole 397 36 

Millie H. Tileston 277 44 

E. Mabel Tyler ....... 313 76 

Anna F. Craddock 477 54 

Bertha I. Berger . 296 01 

Edna G. Spitz 320 75 

Elizabeth K. Myles 88 19 

Gladys G. MacDonald ....'. 323 53 

Harriet M. Mulry . . . . ■ . . 193 34 

Emma I. Thomas 272 21 

A. Gertrude Daley 518 71 

Mary R. Cady 298 59 

Marie I. Williams 295 23 

Sarah M. Hayes 359 07 

Katharine C. Collins . . . . . . 342 32 

Marion S. Tewksbury 17 27 

Annie B. McNeil . . . . . . 495 61 

Francis E. Deady . . . . . . 244 30 

Benjamin B. Towne 277 60 

Marion G. Noyes . . . . . .178 52 

Agnes F. Brown 83 65 

20,812 04 

Total $560,000 00 



PAUPER INFANTS. 

Board . $43,029 51 

Clothing . 6,445 24 

Nursery expenses 1,927 71 

Physicians, medical attendance, hospitals, etc. . . . 3,202 20 

Burial 269 00 

Miscellaneous, assistance, express, etc 550 90 

Traveling expenses of officers: 

Edwin F. Cummings $72 58 

Frederick A. Burt 331 13 

Eunice A. Miller 383 72 

Edwin R. Sparrow 205 28 

Helen F. Horan 412 87 

S. Eleanor Merrill 425 81 



Amounts carried forward .... $1,83139 $55,42456 



210 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Amounts brought forward 



$1,831 39 $55,424 56 



Traveling expenses of officers - 


- concluded. 






Sarah E. Rawson 




. 267 98 




Mary T. McCann 




. 464 93 




Abigail F. Barrett 




. 301 98 




Beatrice K. Quinn 




. 233 32 




Elizabeth J. McDermott 




. 475 84 


3,575 44 






Total . 


$59,000 00 









TUITION OF STATE CHILDREN. 



City and town bills $61,795 



AUXILIARY VISITORS. 

Traveling and other expenses of auxiliary visitors 
Traveling and other expenses of almshouse visitors 



Total 



$8 79 
200 42 



$209 21 



City and tow 



SUPPORT OF SICK STATE PAUPERS. 

n bills of 1909 . . . . . . 

" " 1911 . . . . . . 

" " 1912 

" " 1913 

" " 1914 

" " 1915 

" " 1916 



$25 71 

148 83 

86 60 

1,368 56 

8,362 26 

48,115 56 

31,891 98 

$89,999 50 



BURIAL OF STATE PAUPERS. 

City and town bills of 1911 . . . 

" " " " " 1912 

" " " " 1913 

" " " " 1914 

" " " " 1915 

" " " " " 1916 



$15 00 

7 00 

80 15 

530 40 

4,540 09 

2,827 10 



$7,999 74 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



211 



TEMPORARY 


AID OF STATE PAUPERS. 




City and town bills of 1909 . 


$63 00 


" " u '" 1910 




182 41 


u u a tt 19U 




123 03 


u a a a igi2 




199 65 


" " " " 1913 




664 06 


a « « « 1914 




8,511 46 


tt .a tt a a 1915 




129,937 18 


a tt a tt a 1Q16 




10,319 13 




$149,999 92 


AIDING MOTHERS WITH DEPENDENT CHILDREN. 




City and town bills of 1914 


$4,967 47 


" " " " 1915 


82,025 84 


" " " " 1916 


213,005 47 




$299,998 78 


DANGEROUS DISEASES. 




City and town bills of 1909 . . . . . 


$18 71 


" " " " 1911 ....... 


28 00 


" " " " 1912 . . ... . . 


57 43 


" " " " 1913 


2,109 33 


11 " " " 1914 . . . . . . . 


6,627 63 


" " " " 1915 


44,758 69 


'.' " " " 1916 


26,270 04 


Total city and town bills . . . .... 


$79,869 83 


Inland fares . 


130 00 




$79,999 83 



PENIKESE HOSPITAL. 

Salaries : 

Frank H. Parker, M.D., Superintendent .... $2,500 00 

William J. McDonald, M.D., Resident Physician . . 779 57 

James A. Honeij, M.D., Resident Physician . . . . 416 67 

Samuel F. Bryant 160 00 

Eugene L. Douglas 165 00 

Mary I. Farnsworth , 375 00 

Corydon F. Hicks 416 67 

Amount carried forward , . $4,812 91 



212 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Amount brought forward $4,812 91 

Mary E. Hicks . . . 250 00 

William Kennedy 425 00 

Peter Ryan . 90 00 

William Young 90 00 

Melvin A. Nason 870 83 

Harold R. Currier 162 06 

Tony Stamkowsky . . . . . . . . . 50 32 

John Powell 62 90 

Edith H. Nason 300 12 

Fedos Resetowsky . . 77 42 

Fred Currier 58 00 

Joseph Hill 40 00 

Arthur Starr 240 00 

Patrick Donovan 232 25 

Total salaries . . . ' . . ..... $7,761 81 

Extra wages and labor 2,783 93 

Travel, transportation and office expenses .... 877 07 

Food 4,258 31 

Clothing and materials 530 99 

Furnishings and household supplies . . . ...".. 1,293 06 

Medical and general care 2,470 32 

Heat, light and power . 3,140 88 

Farm and stable 2,748 29 

Grounds 143 15 

Repairs, ordinary 1,322 58 

Repairs and renewals 898 22 

Total $28,228 61 

ANNUAL REPORT. 

Printing annual report $2,793 77 

The above details may be classified as follows: — 

Salaries $179,909 76 

Travel of members 491 24 

Other travel 36,520 33 

Printing 1,936 38 

Postage 2,955 94 

Stationery and office expenses 7,146 82 

Support of State wards 656,408 41 

Amount carried forward $885,368 88 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 213 

Amount brought forward ....... $885,368 88 

Transportation 11,755 22 

Support of State outdoor poor 627,867 77 

Penikese Hospital . 28,228 61 

Printing annual report . 2,793 77 

Total $1,556,014 25 



In order to insure greater efficiency and larger effort in 
service, and also to prevent the necessity of frequent con- 
sideration of special petitions for increase in salary, the Board 
has for many years maintained a graded system of increases 
operating automatically in the several grades of its employees. 
By chapter 605, Acts of 1914, the Commonwealth substantially 
enacted this system into its statutes, though the minimum 
amounts to be paid under the new law are materially higher 
than those allowed under the Board's system. As applied to 
all branches of the Board's service, other than clerical positions 
falling under the law above mentioned, the system is as fol- 
lows: — 

Men. — Visitors: first two years, $1,200; third year, $1,300; 
fourth year, $1,400; thereafter, $1,500. Transportation officers 
holding special District Police commissions: first two years, 
$900; third and fourth years, $1,000; thereafter, $1,100. Other 
transportation officers: first two years, $700; third year, $800; 
fourth year, $900; fifth year, $1,000; thereafter, $1,100. 
Medical visitors of State adult poor: first two years, $1,200; 
third year, $1,350; fourth year, $1,500; fifth year, $1,650; 
thereafter, $1,800. Medical visitors of infants: first two years, 
$1,200; third year, $1,275; fourth year, $1,350; fifth year, 
$1,425; thereafter, $1,500. Assistant visitors: first two years, 
$600; third year, $700; fourth year, $800; fifth year, $900; 
thereafter, $1,000. Messengers: first two years, $250; second 
two years, $300; thereafter, $400. 

Women. — Transportation officers: first two years, $600; 
third year, $650; fourth year, $700; fifth year, $750; there- 
after, $800. Visitors: first two years, $800; third year, $900; 
thereafter, $1,000. Visitor-at-large of boarded children: first 



214 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

two years, $800; third year, $875; fourth year, $950; fifth 
year, $1,025; thereafter, $1,100. 

Under the graded system salaries are increased during the 
present fiscal year as follows: Agnes F. Brown, December 1, 

1916, to $850; Anna B. McNeil, December 1, 1916, to $850; 
Joseph E. Quinn, December 15, 1916, to $1,000; A. Gertrude 
Daley, January 1, 1917, to $900; G. Arthur Bodwell, February 
2, 1917, to $1,400; Edward J. McDonough, February 24, 1917, 
to $1,500; Clarke S. Gould, May 3, 1917, to $1,000; Sarah M. 
Hayes, May 24, 1917, to $900; Abigail F. Barrett, May 25, 

1917, to $1,000; Marie I. Williams, June 1, 1917, to $900; 
H. Gardner Lund, June 1, 1917, to $1,300; Roy D. Merchant, 
July 1, 1917, to $1,300; Elizabeth J. McDermott, July 1, 1917, 
to $900; James H. Quigley, July 20, 1917, to $1,000; Beatrice 
K. Quinn, November 12, 1917, to $1,000; Francis E. Deady, 
November 16, 1917, to $1,400; John B. Gallagher, November 
17, 1917, to $1,500; Frederick F. Green, November 17, 1917, 
to $1,500; William A. Bailey, November 18, 1917, to $1,400; 
James H. Taylor, November 23, 1917, to $1,400; James J. 
Winston, November 23, 1917, to $1,400; Gladys G. MacDonald, 
November 23, 1917, to $1,000; Harriet M. Mulry, November 
23, 1917, to $1,000; Lillian D. Parks, January 10, 1917, to $800; 
Florence A. Blanchard, January 17, 1917, to $550; Sadie G. 
Proudman, March 29, 1917, to $850; Sara L. Shure, May 1, 
1917, to $550; Frances H. Barry, July 10, 1917, to $650; Mary 
T. Killion, July 15, 1917, to $700; Gerard A. Halpin, August 
21, 1917, to $800; Alice S. Bennett, August 16, 1917, to $600; 
Nora E. Healy, September 15, 1917, to $550; Herbert L. Keeble 
October 1, 1917, to $850; Alice C. Taylor, October 1, 1917, to 
$850. 

Under the provisions of chapter 605, Acts of 1914, above 
mentioned, certain salaries in the Board's clerical force were 
automatically increased, as follows: Mary E. Callahan, De- 
cember 1, 1916, to $850; Annie G. Carpenter, December 1, 
1916, to $900; Isa M. Dempsey, December 1, 1916, to $850; 
Florence G. Dickson, December 1, 1916, to $850; Ethel S. 
Greene, December 1, 1916, to $850; Jennie I. Gurney, Decem- 
ber 1, 1916, to $850; Matilda V. Hall, December 1, 1916, to 
$850; Sophia S. Finkelstein, December 1, 1916, to $850; May 



Part L] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 215 

F. Fuller, December 1, 1916, to $850; Lillian G. Gaffey, Decem- 
ber 1, 1916, to $850; Winifred C. Gilbody, December 1, 1916, 
to $850; Mary C. McLain, December 1, 1916, to $850; Lauretta 
M. Moran, December 1, 1916, to $850; Margaret E. O'Connell, 
December 1, 1916, to $850; Marion L. T. Bucknam, December 
1, 1916, to $900; Marie T. Conners, December 1, 1916, to $750; 
Susie L. Glynn, December 1, 1916, to $850; Florence M. Hag- 
erty, December 1, 1916, to $850; Frances J. Love, December 
1, 1916, to $600; Georgiana M. Maheu, December 1, 1916, to 
$850; Maude A. McLean, December 1, 1916, to $850; Anna E. 
Murphy, December 1, 1916, to $850; Mary A. Murphy, De- 
cember 1, 1916, to $850; Lucy F. Sullivan, December 1, 1916, 
to $850; Mary J. Sullivan, December 1, 1916, to $850; Frank 
J. Yeager, December 13, 1916, to $800. 

The auxiliary visitors of older girls placed out, 1916-17, are: 
Ella M. Bacall, Newton Highlands; Martha B. Bishop, North 
Brookfleld; Mrs. Sanford Boice, South Ashfield; Alice T. S. 
Brewster, Pittsfield; Elizabeth R. Bridgman, Belchertown; 
Mary E. Brown, West Roxbury; Mabelle L. Butler, Franklin; 
Sarah Alden Burt, West Tisbury; Ellen T. A. Callahan, Worces- 
ter; Mrs. Arthur W. Carr, Bridgewater; Margaret E. Costello, 
Franklin; Florence S. A. Davis, Quincy; Emma L. Dickinson, 
Baldwinville; Rev. Sarah I. Dixon, Tewksbury; Mrs. Frank S. 
Field, Shattucksville; Elvira M. Gorham, Bellows Falls, Vt.; 
Flora R. Greely, Athol; Ellen M. Hartwell, Littleton Common; 
Rose Boyle Herbert, Worcester; Lucy A. Hitchcock, Palmer; 
Cora Huse, Wakefield; Florence W. Hutchinson, Pepperell; 
Elizabeth H. Kelley, Falmouth; Sara G. Knight, Worcester; 
M. Edna Larabee, Melrose; Margaret Mclntyre, Worcester; 
Mary K. Morton, Hatfield; Mary Lawlor Murphy, Boston; 
Abigail F. Nims, Greenfield; Mary Quirk, South Boston; Helen 
Russell, Plymouth; Katherine V. Shinners, Dorchester; Sabra 
C. Snell, Amherst; Florence Stowe, Belmont; Mary B. Towns- 
ley, Springfield; Bertha L. Turner, Watertown; Ellen H. Under- 
wood, South Dennis; Mary E. Veber, Charlemont; Abbie'M. 
White, Farnumsville; Harriet J. Williams, Wellfleet. 

The volunteer visitors to the State Infirmary, 1916-17, are: 
Catherine L. Delaney, South Boston; Edith F. George, Boston; 
Mary Goodell, Lowell; Hazel Hanchette, Lowell; Ora M. Lewis, 



216 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17, Part I. 

Boston; Ada E. Sheffield, Cambridge; Mary Byers Smith, 
Andover; Margaret S. Winslow, Boston. 

The parole visitors of prisoners released from the State Farm, 
1916-17, are: Albert Arnold, Boston; Cornelius Buckley, 
Natick; Rev. Eugene Carney, Roxbury; Peter Carr, Lawrence; 
Rev. Clark Carter, Lawrence; Chester L. Clark, Milford; 
Edward G. Clark, Westfield; James H. Conley, Charlestown; 
William F. Dineen, North Adams; Rev. Timothy J. Fahey, 
Roxbury; Frank E. Flaherty, Somerville; William Forsberg, 
Worcester; Rev. Thomas Gilhooly, Roxbury; Edward A. Hall, 
Springfield; George L. Harris, Northampton; Harold C. Haskell, 
Brookline; J. Fred Leslie, Woburn; Rev. Oscar Lindegren, East 
Boston; Joseph P. Love, Webster; John E. Lynch, Boston; 
Peter J. Lynch, Melrose; Oswald J. McCourt, West Newton; 
Thomas J. McEneaney, Lawrence; John J. McGaffigan, Bos- 
ton; John J. McGrath, Amesbury; John F. Mitchell, Marl- 
borough; Rev. William G. Mullin, Lowell; Rev. Frank V. 
Murphy, Roxbury; William H. O'Neil, Salem; Artemus Pack- 
ard, Cambridge; Moses J. Perrault, Fitchburg; Frederick W. 
Robinson, Boston; Thomas B. Rounds, Somerset; D. W. 
Stowell, Huntington; Michael Sweeney, Fall River; John W. 
Trehy, Chicopee; Rev. John B. Whiteman, Greenfield; Edward 
B. Wilbur, Taunton; John A. Winn, Charlestown; Capt. James 
A. Wright, Beverly. 

MEETINGS OF THE BOARD. 

During the official year ending November 30, 1916, the 
Board held twenty-five meetings, viz., twenty-four regular 
meetings and one adjourned meeting. The attendance of 
members at these meetings was as follows: Mr. Lincoln, eight 
meetings; Mr. Adams, twenty-one; Mr. Johnson, twenty-three; 
Mr. Ratshesky, thirteen, Mr. Brackett, seventeen; Mr. Downey, 
two; Miss Barr, twenty-three; Dr. Merrick, twenty-two; Mrs. 
Guild, twelve. There were, in addition, frequent meetings of 
the Standing Committees. 

The results of all these meetings are embodied in the fore- 
going report. 



INDEX TO PART I. 



Administrative duties of the Board 

Adoptions ........ 

Adult poor in families ...... 

Adult poor, superintendent of .... 

After-care of women and children from State Infirmary 
Almshouses, dependent children in ... 

Appropriations for maintenance of State charitable institutions 
Appropriations of State charitable institutions for special purposes 
Auxiliary visitors .......... 

Blind, act providing exchange of information in case of blind public de 
pendents ..... 

Board, by-laws of ... 

Board, duties of . 

Board finances, .... 

Board members, past and present . 
Board, organization of . 
Boarding houses for infants . 
Bridgewater. See State Farm. 
By-laws of the Board 
Canton. See Hospital School. 
Capacity of State institutions 
Charitable corporations, recommendation of Board's approval of incorpo 
ration .... 

Children, dependent, in almshouses 

Dependent, outside of almshouses 

Laws affecting delinquent 

Over three years of age, State wards 

Statistics of . 

Tuition of ... . 

Under three years of age, State ward 
Cities and towns, law promoting building of tuberculosis hospitals in 

Penalty for failure to make pauper returns 

Recommendation for increase in rate of reimbursement for sick aid 
rendered by 

Settled poor relieved by . 
Committees of the Board, standing 
Cost of maintenance of State institutions 
Counties, act providing for the construction of 
County training schools 

Resolve requiring special study touching 
Dangerous diseases .... 

Law governing notice amended 
Delinquent children, law affecting . 
Dependent children in almshouses . 

Outside of almshouses 



tuberculosis hospitals 



PAGE 

7, 144 

173 

115 

3 

150 

116 

96 

98 

215 



218 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Desertion and dependency 

Discharges from the State Infirmary 

Drunkards. See State Farm and Norfolk State Hospital 

Duties of the Board • . 

Essex County Training School 

Estimates for maintenance of State institutions 

Expenditures of State charitable institutions 

Expenses of the Board .... 

Families, settled poor in 

Feeble-minded recommendations for more care 

Feeble-mindedness among after-care cases 

Female inebriates recommendation for care of, at Norfolk State Hospital 

Finances of the Board . 

Financial administration of institutions 

Functions of the Board 

Girls in county training schools 

State Industrial School for 
Graded system of salaries 
Hampden County Training School 
Hospital Cottages for Children, Baldwinville 
Hospital School, the Massachusetts 
Hospital for sick State wards, recommendation for . 
Hospitals, law providing for the building of, by counties 

Tuberculosis, in cities and towns, law promoting the building of . 
Incorporation of private charities, recommendation that approval of Board 

requisite to 
Industrial School for Boys 
Industrial School for Girls 
Inebriates, female, recommendations for care at Norfolk State Hospital 
Infants, boarding houses for . 
Inmates of State institutions, numbers 
Institutions, the State charitable 
Insurance in mothers' aid cases 
Inventory of State institutions 
Investigating department 

Juvenile delinquency, resolve requiring special study of, by the Board 
Lakeville State Sanatorium . 
Lancaster. See Industrial School for Girls 
Laws affecting the Board passed in 1916 
Legislation, recommendations for . 
Lepers, Penikese Hospital for 
Licensed boarding houses for infants 
Licensed lying-in hospitals 

Licenses to sell articles for charitable purposes, law authorizing 
Lying-in hospitals .... 

Lyman School for Boys 
Maintenance of State institutions, cost of 

Estimates for 
Massachusetts Hospital School 
Meetings of the Board .... 
Members of the Board, past and present 
Middlesex County Training School 
Minor wards, State .... 

Superintendent of . 
Minors, act affecting employment of, in the summer season 



PAGE 

135, 151 
152 

6 

109 

30 

34, 83 

200 

115 

9 

151 

11 

199 

76 

6 

111 

52 

213 

109 

27 



be 



Part I.] GENERAL WORK OF THE BOARD. 



219 



at 



27 
Board be requisite to 






Mothers' aid ......... 

Nonsupport proceedings ....... 

Norfolk, Bristol and Plymouth Union Training School 

Norfolk State Hospital, recommendation for care of female inebriates 

North Reading State Sanatorium . 

Officers of the Board .... 

Organization of the Board 
Organization of the report 
Parole visitors ..... 

Pauper returns, penalties for failure to make 

Paupers, city and town 

Pay roll of State institutions . 

Penalty incurred by cities and towns, pauper returns 

Penikese Hospital 

Recommendation for separate Board of Trustees to administer 
Poor persons in families, settled 
Population of State institutions 
Private charities, recommendation that approval of 

incorporation of 
Public lodging houses 
Receipts of State charitable institutions 
Recommendations for legislation 

Reimbursements for sick aid, recommendation of increase in rate 
Removals of public dependents 
Rutland State Sanatorium 
Salaries, graded system of 
Sanatoria, the State 

Schooling of children in Board's custody 
Secretary of the Board . 
Settled poor .... 

Settlement work .... 

Shirley. See Industrial School for Boys. 

Sick aid by cities and towns, increase in rate of reimbursement for, recom- 
mended ...... 

Solicitation for charitable purposes, law affecting 
Special appropriations for State charitable institutions 
Staff organization of the Board 
State charitable institutions . 

Appropriations and expenditures 

Capacity .... 

Expenditures of 

Financial administration of 

Inventory of . 

Maintenance of, cost 

Maintenance of, estimates for . 

Movement of population 

Net cost to the Commonwealth 

Numbers of inmates 

Pay roll of 

Receipts of 

Special appropriations for 

Trustees of ■ . 

State Farm ..... 
State Infirmary .... 

After-care of women and children discharged from 



PAGE 

119 

173 

109 

11 

61 

3 

3 

2 

216 

118 

114 

102 

118 

68 

10 

115 

29,32 

11 
142 

81 
9 

12 
148 

59 
213 

58 

195 

3 

114 

148 



12 
15 

98 
7 
25 
96 
27 
34,83 
76 



29 



76 

,84 
30 
29 

100 
27 

102 
81 
98 
26 
40 
35 

150 



220 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. Parti. 



tudy 



State minor wards ..... 

Recommendation for hospital care . 
State outdoor poor . ... 

State training schools ..... 
State tuberculosis sanatoria .... 
Statistics of children ..... 
Suffolk School for Boys, resolve providing special 

acquiring by the State .... 
Supervision of mothers' aid ..... 

Of wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses . 
Supervisory duties of the Board . . . . - 

Syphilis and gonorrhea ...... 

Tag days, etc., law affecting ..... 

Temporary aid ....... 

Tewksbury. See State Infirmary. 

Training schools, county ..... 

State 

Transmissal, letter of ..... . 

Truant schools. See Training Schools. 

Trustees of State institutions .... 

Tuberculosis hospitals, law providing the building of, by 

Law promoting the building of, in cities and towns 
Tuberculosis in mothers' aid cases .... 

Tuberculosis sanatoria, the State .... 

Tuition of children in Board's custody 

Unmarried mothers ...... 

Wards of the State, minor ..... 

Wayfarers' lodges and public lodging houses 

Westborough. See Lyman School. 

Westfield State Sanatorium ..... 

Widows' pensions. See Mothers' Aid. 

Wife settlement cases ...... 

Women and children discharged from State Infirmary 
Worcester County Training School 



of advisability of 



PAGE 

161 
9 

144 
45 
58 

174 

25 

119 

142 

6 

152 

15 
146 

109 
45 



26 

20 

15 

133 

58 

195 

150 

161 

142 

65 

145 
150 

109 



REPORT 

OF THE 

State Board of Charity 



Paet II 



Charitable Corporations 



PEIVATE CHAEITABLE COKPOKATIONS. 



Government supervision of private charitable corporations is 
provided in three legislative enactments, the first of which re- 
quires the State Board of Charity to investigate all petitions 
for charitable charters, while the second and third call for 
annual inspection and annual reporting. In the following pages 
of this part of the report the functions of the Board and the 
year's work under these several statutes are explained. This 
statement is followed by abstracts of the annual returns of the 
various charities in a form intended to serve as a handbook of 
all the incorporated charities of the Commonwealth. 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations seeking Incorporation. 

Acts of 1910, Chapter 181. 

Section 1. Before making and issuing a certificate for the incorpora- 
tion of a charitable corporation the secretary of the commonwealth shall 
also forward such statement as is described in the preceding section to 
the state board of charity, which shall immediately make an investiga- 
tion as to the persons who have asked to be incorporated and as to the 
purposes of the incorporation, and any other material facts relative 
thereto, and shall give them a public hearing, notice of which shall be 
published once a week for three successive weeks in some paper pub- 
lished in the county in which the corporation is to have its principal 
office or rooms, and if said office or rooms are to be in Boston, in some 
Boston daily paper, the last publication to be at least three days before 
the day set for the hearing, and shall forthwith report to the secretary 
of the commonwealth all the facts ascertained by it. If it appears to 
the secretary of the commonwealth from said report or otherwise that 
the probable purpose of the formation of the proposed corporation is 
to cover any illegal business, or that the persons asking for incorporation 
are not suitable persons, from lack of financial ability or from any other 
cause, he shall refuse to issue his certificate. If he refuses to issue his 
certificate, the persons asking to be incorporated may appeal to the 
superior court, which shall hear the case and finally determine whether 
or not the certificate of incorporation shall be issued. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 



iv STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

During the year ending November 30, 1916, 59 applications 
for charters have been referred by the Secretary of the Com- 
monwealth to this Board, which has investigated, given hear- 
ings and reported upon the 51 applications noted below. In 
6 of the remaining cases the petitions were withdrawn by the 
petitioners before report. Reports were made also in the case 
of 4 other petitions previously received and pending when the 
year began. Two cases were pending at the end of the year. 

A. C. Ratshesky Charity Foundation, Boston. 

Bakers Helping Association, The, Boston. 

Boston Industrial Aid Association, Boston. 

Boston National Elks Convention Association, Boston. 

Boston Retail Shoe Salesmen's Association, Inc., Boston. 

Boylan Memorial Hospital of Pittsfield, Mass., Inc., The, Pittsfield. 

Braintree Friendly Aid Association, Braintree. 

Brockton Boys' Club Association, The, Brockton. 

Building Association of Division 12, Ancient Order of Hibernians, The, 
Beverly. 

Children's Heart Hospital, Inc., Boston. 

Christian Science Benevolent Association, The, Brookline. 

Churchhaven, Nantucket, Inc., Nantucket. 

Cloak Finishers Association of Boston, The, Boston. 

Everett Young Men's Hebrew Association, Everett. 

Forster Trust Association, Boston. 

Framingham Civic League, Inc., Framingham. 

Gemilith Chesed of Salem, Inc., Salem. 

Haverhill Union Mission, Inc., Haverhill. 

Hebrew Ladies' Charitable Association of Revere, Revere. 

Italian Evangelical Mission of Hyde Park, Mass., Inc., The, Hyde Park. 

Knights of Columbus Building Association of Winchester, Mass., Win- 
chester. 

Lawrence Lodge No. 440, Loyal Order of Moose, Lawrence. 

Lithuanian Sons Society of Springfield, Massachusetts, The, Springfield. 

Lowell Social Service League, Inc., Lowell. 

Luby Association, The, Shrewsbury. 

Maiden Lodge No. 965, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks of the 
United States of America Building Association, Maiden. 

Marlborough Woman's Club, Marlborough. 

Massachusetts Prisoners Welfare League, Inc., The, Boston. 

Middlesex Charitable Infirmaries, Inc., Cambridge. 

Missionary Union of Lynn, Inc., Lynn. 

Monson Home for Aged People, Inc., Monson. 

Moseley Fund for Social Service in Newburyport, The, Newburyport. 

Mt. Lebanon Club, Boston. 






Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. v 

New Bedford Auto Drivers Association, New Bedford. 

New England Association for the Benefit of the Orphans and the Disabled 

Soldiers of the War in France, Boston. 
Parish of the Sacred Heart of Jesus of the Lithuanian National Catholic 

Church, Lawrence. 
Peabody Community House, Inc., The, Peabody. 
Polish National Defense Society, The, Salem. 

Quinsigamond Improvement and Educational Association, The, Worcester. 
Rufus S. Frost General Hospital Aid Association, Inc., Chelsea. 
Society of Kerasiton St. Athanasios, The, Boston. 
Springfield Federation for Charity and Philanthropy, Inc., Springfield. 
Springfield Finnish Workingmen's Association "Toivo," Springfield. 
Stoneham Visiting Nurse Association, Stoneham. 
Truesdale Hospital, Inc., The, Fall River. 
Union Chapel Association of South Milford, Hopedale. 
Vileika Aid Association of Lynn, Lynn. 
Wellesley Students' Aid Society, Inc., The, Wellesley. 
West End Matan Basaiser Charitable Association, The, Boston. 
Womans Auxiliary of the Massachusetts State Firemans Association, 

Boston. 
Women's Jndustrial Association of Roxbury, Roxbury. 

Forty-eight of the above petitions have been granted and 
charters issued, while 3 have been refused. 

During the six years and nine months which have elapsed 
since the passage of the law (March 7, 1910, to November 30, 
1916) the Board has reported upon 366 applications for charters, 
309 of which were granted, 56 refused, while 1 withdrew after 
investigation. In 52 other cases the applications were with- 
drawn before investigation. 

During the year 3 charters were either surrendered or dis- 
solved by court decree, as follows: — 

St. Joseph's Industrial School for Boys. 
Westfield Home for Aged Women. 
Worcester Social Settlement Association. 

Inspection of Charitable Corporations. 

Chapter 379 of the Acts of 1909 requires the State Board of 
Charity to make annual inspection of charitable corporations 
which consent to said inspection. The text of the act is as 
follows: — 



vi STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

Acts of 1909, Chapter 379. 

Section 1. The state board of charity, upon the request or with the 
consent of a charitable corporation which, under the provisions of section 
fourteen of chapter eighty-four of the Revised Laws, as amended by 
chapter four hundred and two of the acts of the year nineteen hundred 
and three, is required to make an annual report to said board, shall, at 
least once in even* year, visit and inspect the institution or investigate 
the work of such corporation. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

In the six years since the work of inspection was begun, 1,316 
visits of inspection have been made to charitable corporations 
in all pans of the Commonwealth, including 214 inspections 
during the past twelve months. 

In 1916 there were 160 inquiries in regard to particular 
agencies by persons not connected with them as officers or 
members, and 466 inquiries on general matters connected with 
the field of private charity. 

This year, as in the past, conferences have been held with 
boards of directors of societies in many different cities through- 
out the State. Increasing interest has been shown on the part 
of those responsible for the management of the various charities 
to become familiar with the work of other organizations of 
similar purpose, as well as to confer in regard to adapting and 
expanding their work to meet larger needs in their local com- 
munities. 

Public attention is again directed to the fact that the State 
Board of Charity, regardless of the known standing of any 
society in question, does not endorse charities. Inspection does 
not mean approval; on the contrary, it may mean the discovery 
of conditions calling for condemnation. Xo agency is war- 
ranted, therefore, in using the fact of inspection in such man- 
ner as to lead the public to believe that the State Board has 
in fact approved or in any sense recommended its work. 

More and more as the work of inspection progresses the 
Board finds incompleteness and ineffectiveness among charitable 
associations due in the main to lack of perspective in the per- 
formance of their undertakings. The charity field contains 
many managers and groups of trustees who appear to look 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. vii 

upon themselves as independent of all other community forces, 
separate in judgment, aloof in purpose. As a consequence of 
this narrow horizon they interpret the needs to which they 
minister as individual needs merely, without taking into ac- 
count the paramount interests of the community. In the spirit 
of charity, therefore, they proceed to carry out the immediate 
dictates of sympathy without regard to the broader problem 
involved. 

Experience in the conduct of charity teaches nothing so 
clearly as the necessity in relief-giving of seeing first the public 
well-being and of interpreting the needs and importunities of 
the individual in terms only of that welfare. The best, therefore, 
that can be said of many of our charitable societies is that their 
service, because of its greatness of heart and its sincerity of 
purpose, is of tremendous potential value, — so potent that it 
remains for the public, through an intelligent system of gov- 
ernment supervision, to redirect it into right channels. 

In no phase of charity does this failure of perspective betray 
itself so readily as in the field of material relief. Where the 
society is found habitually viewing itself as one only of the 
instruments for social betterment, — seeking to interrelate itself 
to other community forces, economic, educational, spiritual, — 
there also may be found an insistence upon a full understanding 
of the need before giving the aid, and there also may be ob- 
served the effort so to organize the elements of relief in each 
case that the aid shall be adequate to meet the need that has 
been ascertained. 

A brief survey of the 152 corporations now engaged in Massa- 
chusetts in the giving of material relief will serve to illustrate 
the distinction just drawn. This large group may be divided 
roughly into three kinds, viz.: (1) organizations that have 
existed for seventy-five or one hundred years with activities 
and methods of work that have changed slightly if at all since 
the beginning, regardless of changes in the complexion and 
needs of the community; (2) a large number of societies formed 
in recent years, chiefly among Jewish people, that differ very 
little from the former group in their method of relief; (3) a 
large and constantly growing list of agencies formed to give 
special aid or to aid special groups. The majority of this class 



viii STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

are in Boston. Three or four concerns falling within this third 
classification give relief to their own members only or to the 
widows or minor children of members. 

These material relief bodies are located in a total of 44 cities 
and towns. Twelve localities contain 3 or more, while 28 have 
but 1 incorporated relief agency. 

The whole 152 show invested funds amounting to $9,097,- 
125.70. Their total income by last returns was $1,213,378.39; 
their total expenditures, $1,121,327.02. Of this total outlay, 
$751,766.21 went in the form of money or provisions. The 
total pay roll was $180,161.90; but this item was confined to 
84, since 68 paid no salaries. Among the agencies paying no 
salaries the work of discovering the genuineness of need and the 
expediency of relief is usually done by directors acting as in- 
vestigating committees. These volunteers seldom preserve 
competent records, and fail in large measure to bring to their 
casual work of inquiry that degree of skill and carefulness 
necessary in the performance of a function so vital to the public 
welfare. There are many praiseworthy exceptions among the 
volunteers just as there are deplorable exceptions among the 
ranks of those to whom work of this sort is a life interest, 
filling all the time of each day. But on the average, as between 
the casual volunteer, with no veto or supervisory power above 
him save public opinion, and the constant workman, with 
critics to satisfy, dependent upon his skill and his results, there 
can be no question which method better administers the trust; 
which of the two is more economical in actual money; or which 
makes a greater saving of citizenship forces in proportion to 
the losses in self-respect and in the will to (do for one's self and 
for others which attend almost all charitable interference with 
the individual. 

A questionnaire sent to a group of the older relief societies 
in one of the cities outside of Boston brought back answers 
which emphasize the contrast. The beneficiaries of these char- 
ities are for the most part fully dependent upon charitable aid, 
yet in a group of 5 agencies with 263 beneficiaries aided during 
the year there was no individual who received in the year more 
than $60 from any one of them. This meant that where the 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. ix 

recipient was wholly or largely dependent upon charity he was 
forced to apply to other societies for the necessaries of life, 
even though the agency in question must have considered him 
eligible to relief to have given him anything. In answer to the 
question "How many of your cases were aided by other relief 
agencies or overseers of the poor, as well as by your own 
society V one answer read, "Seven out of 11 new cases for 
the year;" another, "We have no connection with any other 
relief organization ;" and still another, "The majority." Each 
of these agencies professed "thorough investigation" before 
relief, but all, with a single exception, answered "No" to the 
question, "Do you get relatives, churches, former employers 
and other interested persons to contribute to make up the sum 
needed in each case?" The one exception answered, "Occa- 
sionally." The replies indicate a uniform practice of admin- 
istering their trusts, most of which have been established 
anciently in wills, by confining the entire activities to dividing 
up the net income of the fund among as many persons as 
possible who are eligible within the wording of the trust, pay- 
ing out the same as a dole at regular intervals. It is a method 
that can do little to foster self J help in the individual. Indeed, 
it is probable that there are few forces tending to pauperize the 
individual as potent as this type of charity. The need of the 
present time is for constructive planning, which protects the 
public against imposition and salvages for the use of the com- 
munity all the self-help that can be induced in the citizen 
found in distress, — a process which brings to ascertained 
want all the sympathetic assistance that the true spirit of 
charity demands. 

The minimum requirements of boards of managers in the 
relief of the individual case should be — 

1. An investigation of the need of the applicant before aid is 
given beyond the relief of immediate and obvious distress. 
Such an investigation should ascertain all possible sources of 
income, all means by which the applicant can be helped or 
can help himself. It is only by determining, beyond a reason- 
able doubt, the applicant's need of benefaction from the public 
that the society can safeguard that salutary rule of citizenship 



x STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

which provides that every individual in the community owes to 
all the rest the duty of supporting himself and his proper de- 
pendents so far as in him lies. 

2. Aid should never be given as a dole, but should be extended 
as the result of a definite plan looking to the reinstatement of 
the applicant in the ranks of the self-supporting, where such 
reinstatement on all the facts appears possible. If self-support 
is the obligation of citizenship, the philanthropic public should 
not be asked to shoulder an individual burden without all 
possible effort, to be made through a constructive plan, to 
return that burden to its rightful bearer. 

Adherence to these two fundamentals of good charity man- 
agement means that the Massachusetts relief societies as a 
group must undertake real investigations, where at present 
they rely too often upon the casual observations of members 
who are unable to discern or to interpret facts. It means that 
as a result they will give larger sums to fewer applicants, since 
the number of unworthy cases who undoubtedly secure a con- 
siderable percentage of the total of charitable aid given each 
year will diminish; and competent study of the needs of the 
applicant and the means necessary to advance him to a position 
of self-support will dictate adequate relief in each case. The 
sympathetic dole which forms such a large part of the aid now 
given by these societies will decrease, while adequate aid will 
take its place. 

The Board cannot repeat too often its insistence upon the 
trust nature of all charitable funds. A private charity is a 
public trust. Its funds belong to the indefinite public. Its 
managers are trustees clothed with an obligation closely touch- 
ing the public welfare. What they do, therefore, must be done 
for the community good or they betray their trust. If through 
negligence or lack of skill they foster dependency, or through 
ignorance they turn this most difficult of social undertakings, 
the giving of charitable relief, into an instrument for the abuse 
of public confidence and the lowering of the standard of citizen- 
ship responsibility, then also they betray their trust. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. xi 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations. 

The law provides that the Board shall receive annual reports 
of all charitable corporations whose personal property is exempt 
from taxation, and for the dissolution of corporations which 
fail for two consecutive years to report to this Board. The text 
of the law is as follows (Revised Laws, chapter 84, section 14, 
amended by Acts of 1903, chapter 402, amended by Acts of 
1913, chapter 82): — 

A charitable corporation whose personal property is exempt from taxa- 
tion under the provisions of clause three of section five of chapter twelve 
shall annually, on or before the first day of November, make to the state 
board of charity a written or printed report for its last financial year, 
showing its property, its receipts and expenditures, the whole number 
and the average number of its beneficiaries and such other information 
as the board may require. If any corporation subject to the provisions of 
this act shall fail for two successive years to file the said report, the su- 
preme judicial court, upon application by the state board of charity, after 
notice and a hearing may decree a dissolution of the corporation. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon the first day of November 
in the year nineteen hundred and thirteen. 

Of 868 corporations whose returns were called for during the 
last official year, 35 failed to respond. The remaining 833 
corporations filed reports. The names of the delinquent corpo- 
rations follow : — 

Attleboro Young Men's Christian Association, Attleboro. 

Benoth Israel Sheltering Home, Boston. 

Beverly Hebrew Ladies Association, Beverly. 

Bunker Hill Irish Charitable Society, Boston. 

Charlestown Charity Fund, Boston. 

Chevra Chesed Shel Emas, Worcester. 

Chicopee Boys' Club, Chicopee. 

Children's Home, Lowell. 

Chinese Mission of New England, Boston. 

Corps 35, Volunteer Life Saving Service, Revere. 

Daughters of Jacob, Fall River. 

Fall River Hebrew Women's Charitable Institution, Fall River. 

First Spiritualist Ladies' Aid Society, Boston. 

Free Home for Consumptives in the City of Boston, Boston. 

Hebrew Free Loan Association of Fall River, Fall River. 



xii STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. Part II. 

Hebrew Ladies' Helping Hand Society of Fall River, Fall River. 

Hebrew Ladies Helping Hand Society of Taunton, Taunton. 

Home Association for Aged Colored People, Worcester. 

Jewish Associated Charities of Lynn, Lynn. 

Ladies' Auxiliary to the Home for Destitute Jewish Children, Boston. 

Ladies' Kennel Association of Massachusetts, Boston. 

Lynn Home for Children, Lynn. 

Newburyport Howard Benevolent Society, Newburyport. 

Pan Hellenic Union in America, New York City. 

Particular Council Society St. Vincent de Paul of the City of Boston, 

Boston. 
Peabody Hebrew Ladies' Aid Association, Peabody. 
Pittsfield Anti-Tuberculosis Association, Pittsfield. 
Pittsfield Young Men's Christian Association, Pittsfield. 
Polish National Alliance Immigration Aid Society, Boston. 
Roxbury Boys' Club and Institute of Industry, Boston. 
Roxbury Ladies' Bikur Cholim Association, Roxbury. 
St. Peter's Charity Fund in Newburyport, Newburyport. 
Society St. Vincent de Paul, Particular Council of Lynn, Lynn. 
Volunteer Children's Home, Maiden. 
Young Men's Educational Aid Association, Boston. 

Reports. 

Abstracts of reports of corporations for the last financial 
year available are given on the following pages. The reports 
are arranged by towns, in alphabetical order under each town. 

Reports from 203 corporations which do not fall strictly 
within the scope of the Board's publication are on file, but are 
not here printed. Their names w r ill be found in the alphabetical 
list of reporting corporations. 

A list of homes for the aged throughout the State and other 
classified groups for greater Boston will be found at the end. 



REPORTS 



Adams. 

SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE (GREYLOGK REST), East St., Adams. (In- 
corporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary 
Agatha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Providence 
(Catherine Horan), Treasurer; Sister Mary Consilii, Superior. 

Care and treatment of chronic, convalescent and nervous pa- 
tients (insanity excluded). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 443, viz., 410 paying, 24 partly 
paying, 9 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $16,620 36 

Subscriptions and donations . 25 00 

Total current receipts . . $16,645 36 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 128 67 



$16,774 03 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$1,226 62 


Printing, postage and 


office 




supplies 




212 33 


Provisions and supplies 




6,484 97 


Rent and interest 




1,700 00 


Heat, light and power 




1,920 93 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . 




2,049 45 


Paid on mortgage 


• 


2,850 00 


Total current expenses 


$16,444 30 


Cash on hand . 




329 73 




$16,774 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$37,000; mortgage on same, $31,000. 



Amesbury. 

AMESBURY AND SALISBURY HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 276 Main St., 
Amesbury. (Incorporated 1874.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Ella M. Childs, President; Mrs. Frances B. Clement, 
Secretary; Alfred C. Webster, Treasurer; Mrs. G. W. Crowther, 
Superintendent 



2 STATE BOARD OF CHAEITY. [P. D. 17. 

Home for aged women, Protestants, at least seventy years of 
age, inhabitants of Amesbury or Salisbury for five years. Ad- 
mission, $100. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 8. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




Admission fee . 


$100 00 


Salaries and wages . 


. $1,587 75 


Income from investments . 


1,998 54 


Heat, light and power 


258 79 


Membership fees 


100 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs .... 


68 27 






Medicines 


14 55 






Nursing .... 


14 00 






Interest .... 


40 00 






Water rates 


6 82 






Miscellaneous . 
Total current expenses . 


202 07 




. $2,192 25 






Income invested 


6 29 




$2,198 54 


$2,198 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $42,221.21. 



LADIES' CHARITABLE SOCIETY OF AMESBURY, Amesbury. (Incor- 
porated 1887.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. E. A. Childs, President; Mrs. H. C. Austin, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 
To aid the Protestant poor in the town of Amesbury. 
Number of families aided during year, 33. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . 
Income from investments 
Members' dues . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$28 75 

365 70 

54 00 

$448 45 
20 29 

$468 74 



Cr. 

Provisions and supplies 
Cash on hand 



$468 66 
08 



$468 74 



Value of investments, $9,305.29. 



Amherst. 

AMHERST HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, Pleasant St., North Amherst. 

(Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

George Cutler, Jr., President; Forester P. Ainsworth, Secretary; 
Miss Caroline T. Hunt, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary Caroline Leach, 
Matron. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 3 

Home for aged women, Protestants, at least sixty-five years of 
age. Admission fee, $400. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 7. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . . } 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$6,457 42 

121 20 

1,610 79 

$8,189 41 

172 94 



$8,362 35 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Telephone and water . 

Interest .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . . . 



$552 00 

1 10 
592 52 

285 53 

117 95 

40 88 

60 00 

250 48 

$1,900 46 

6,457 42 

4 47 

$8,362 35 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,600; value of investments, $21,865.16. 

Andover. 
ANDOVER GUILD, 10 Brook St., Andover. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Lewis H. Homer, President; Mrs. Bernard M. Allen, Secretary; 
Frederic G. Moore, Treasurer; Miss Fannie E. Davis, Superin- 
tendent. 

Educational and philanthropic work in the town of Andover. 
Sewing, millinery, cooking and dressmaking; sloyd and basketry; 
gymnasium. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number of members, 200. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,436 00 
Membership fees . . . 110 04 
Entertainments, exhibitions, bas- 
ket ball and dances . . 426 96 " 

Rent 19 13 

Miscellaneous . . . . 4 80 



Total current receipts . . $1,996 93 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 24 09 



$2,021 02 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,182 63 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 30 20 

Heat, light and power . . 297 75 

Furnishings and incidental repairs 168 50 

Entertainments . . . 222 60 

Telephone . . . . 21 20 

Miscellaneous . . . . 16 82 

Total current expenses . . $1,939 70 

Cash on hand .... 81 32 

$2,021 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,000. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



ANDOVER HOME FOE AGED PEOPLE, 4 Punchard Ave., Andover. (In- 
corporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Frederic S. Boutwell, President; Mrs. Ida M. McCurdy, Secre- 
tary; David Shaw, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary C. Lewis, Matron. 

Home for women not less than sixty years of age, natives of 
Andover or residents of Andover for not less than ten years prior 
to application. Admission fee, $200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 5. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$44 62 


Salaries and wages 


. S952 63 


Income from investments . 


. 2,600 50 


Printing, postage and office 


sup- 






plies .... 


13 75 






Provisions and supplies 


708 96 






Heat, light and power 


228 29 






Furnishings and incidental repairs 337 SO 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


253 62 




. $2,495 05 






Income transferred to capital 


150 07 




$2,645 12 


$2,645 12 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,814.91; value of investments, S66,918.44. 



Arlington. 

ORDER OF ST. ANNE (ST. JOHN'S HOUSE FOR CHILDREN), 181 Apple- 
ton St., Arlington Heights. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Mother Etheldred, O.S.A., President and Superintendent; 
William Odlin, Esq., Secretary; Sister Anne, O.S.A., Treasurer. 

Home for children of both sexes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 33, viz., 8 paying, 7 partly paying, 
18 free. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from private fund . 
From publication 
From sales 



$1,635 50 

21,832 91 

1,454 79 

696 00 

304 74 



Total current receipts . . $25,923 94 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,146 30 



$29,070 24 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office 

supplies 
Provisions and supplies 
Interest and taxes 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Chapel and grounds . 
Building .... 
Doctors and drugs . 
Express and car fare . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$833 35 

812 93 
3,753 20 

989 51 
1,194 72 

1.199 01 
2,492 48 

12,755 06 

252 81 

160 39 

12 45 

$24,455 91 

1.200 00 
3,414 33 

$29,070 24 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$33,768.35; amount of mortgage on same, $7,500. 



SYMMES ARLINGTON HOSPITAL, Summer St., Arlington. (Incor- 
porated 1902.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Horatio A. Phinney, President; Earl A. Ryder, Secretary; John 
L. Taylor, Treasurer; Miss Nora A. Brown, Superintendent. 

General hospital and training school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13 (including 4 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 386 (including 
46 babies born in hospital); number of free patients, 15; total 
number of hospital days during year, 4,905; number of free 
days, 213, 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest . 

Board, special nurses 
Rent of operating suite 



Total hospital receipts . 
Capital account, depreciation 
from operating expense ac- 
count ..... 



$12,863 43 


3,583 58 


37 


00 


594 


77 


973 


50 


$18,052 28 


1,251 


37 


$19,303 


65 



Cr. 



Administration 


$792 00 


Professional care of patients 


3,629 66 


Department expenses 


. 10,043 54 


Corporate expenses . 


27 56 


Miscellaneous . 


48 11 



Total hospital expenses . . $14,540 87 

Depreciation on furnishings and 

fixtures .... 1,251 37 

Uncollectible accounts charged 

off 346 60 

Capital expenses (building, fur- 
nishings and fixtures) . . 2,970 77 

Cash on hand . . . . 194 04 



$19,303 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$47,960.74; value of investments, $521.20. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Attleboro. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OP ATTLEBORO, INCORPORATED, 
Room 207, Bronson Building, North Main St., Attleboro. (Incor- 
porated 1915.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Clelland J. McClatchey, President; William L. King, Secretary; 
Charles C. Wilmarth, Treasurer; Margaret E. Todd, Superin- 
tendent. 

To aid in systematizing the charities of Attleboro, to check in- 
discriminate giving, and to restore families and individuals to a 
self-supporting basis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided during year, 188. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $12 64 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,234 95 

Total current receipts . . $2,247 59 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,623 16 



$3,870 75 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,433 00 

Printing, postage and office sup- 



pli 



Provisions and supplies 

Rent . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 



pairs 
Miscellaneous 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



113 57 
836 63 
249 00 

3 74 
122 05 

$2,757 99 
1,112 76 

$3,870 75 



THE ATTLEBOROUGH HOSPITAL (OPERATING THE STURDY MEMO- 
RIAL HOSPITAL), 211 Park St., Attleboro. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Joseph L. Sweet, President; Fred G. Simmonds, Secretary; Ed- 
ward L. Gowen, Treasurer; Miss G. G. Rice, Superintendent. 

General hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21 (including 11 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 295; number of 
free patients, 37; total number of hospital days during year, 
3,667; number of free days, 501. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments ... . $8,679 11 
Voluntary contributions . . 1,265 00 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 5,299 46 
Contribution to building ac- 
count 3,534 78 

Membership dues . . . 480 00 

Grass sold .... 4 00 

Total receipts . . . $19,262 35 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,160 16 



$21,422 51 



Cr, 



Salaries .... 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Completing new building 
Repairs on cottage . 



Miscellaneous . 

Total expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$4,841 07 

6,926 28 

3,723 00 

310 78 

121 26 

67 00 

$15,989 39 

558 72 

4,874 40 

$21,422 51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$85,000; value of investments, $68,352.52. 

Avon. 

THE LUTHERAN ORPHANS' HOME BOARD, Main St., Avon. (Incor- 
porated 1906.) 

Report for year ending April 12, 1916. 

Rev. C. F. Johansson, President; Rev. Julius Hulteen, Secretary; 
C. W. O. Lawson, Treasurer; Miss Amalia Rabenius, Matron. 
Home for orphan and destitute children (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 43, viz., 10 partly paying, 33 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
From benefit concert . , 
From guardians 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$1,000 00 

5,351 91 

494 70 

771 50 

30 50 

$7,648 61 

45 97 



$7,694 58 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Provisions and supplies 

Insurance, interest and 
taxes 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and repairs 

Clothing . 

Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



water 



$1,681 88 

187 70 
2,068 36 

681 00 
689 01 
477 00 
511 80 
215 23 



$6,511 98 
1,182 60 

$7,694 58 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$29,242; amount of mortgage on same, $6,500. 



Baldwinville. 

THE HOSPITAL COTTAGES FOR CHILDREN, Baldwinville. (Incor- 
porated 1882.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Herbert S. Morley, President; Robert N. Wallis, Secretary; 
George L. Clark, Treasurer; H. Louis Stick, M.D., Superintendent. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The care, training and treatment of diseased, maimed, feeble- 
minded, destitute and orphan children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 52, including 10 pupil 
nurses. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 126; number of 
free patients, 12; total number of hospital days during year, 
36,966. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions 



Interest, dividends and rentals 15,949 



junk 



Unrestricted legacies 
Sale of live stock, clothing 

etc. 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$18,388 67 
4,176 35 



800 00 

1,479 78 
406 19 

$41,200 97 

7,506 92 

$48,707 89 



Cr. 

Administration 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$16,022 23 
3,623 11 

16,651 64 

247 46 

$36,544 44 
4,529 73 
7,633 72 



$48,707 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$84,295; value of investments, $362,673.59. 



Bakre. 
STETSON HOME, Barre. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Frederic S. Pevear, President; Josephine A. Pevear, Secretary; 
William A. Pevear, Treasurer; Charles L. Cutting, Superintendent. 
Home for orphan boys. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 
Number aided during year, 37, all free. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $14,033 73 

Farm products . . . 1,420 98 

Total current receipts . . $15,454 71 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 12,605 16 



$28,059 87 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$3,318 19 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


116 01 


Provisions and supplies 


2,064 52 


Clothing .... 


732 76 


Heat, light and power 


861 09 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


2,193 71 


Farm supplies .... 


1,918 65 


Additions .... 


6,310 06 


Insurance .... 


377 12 


Miscellaneous .... 


1,395 32 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$19,287 43 
5,000 00 
3,772 44 

$28,059 87 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$29,725; value of investments, $337,600. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Beverly. 

BEVERLY FEMALE CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Beverly. (Incorporated 

1836.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Miss Elizabeth D. Howe, President; Mrs. George A. Woodbury, 
Secretary; Miss Louisa B. Kilham, Treasurer. 
To aid the deserving poor of Beverly. 
Number aided during year, 35. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $108 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 28 50 

Income from investments . . 223 64 



Total current receipts . . $360 14 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 233 71 



$593 85 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . 
To beneficiaries . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested . . . . 
Cash on hand . 



$0 42 
333 53 

$333 95 

28 50 
231 40 

$593 85 



Value of investments, $13,828.50. 

BEVERLY FUEL SOCIETY, 155 Cabot St., Beverly. (Incorporated 1888.) 
Report for year ending September 1, 1916. 

Patrick J. Lynch, President; Benjamin A. Patch, Secretary; 
Charles F. Lee, Treasurer. 

Distribution of fuel to the worthy poor of Beverly. 
Number aided during year, 71. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Rebate tax 



$80 00 

418 82 

19 72 



Total current receipts . . $518 54 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 134 66 



$653 20 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Total current expenses 
Income invested . 
Cash on hand 



sup- 



$1 25 
396 55 

$397 80 

53 82 

201 58 

$653 20 



Value of investments, $9,386.99. 



BEVERLY HOSPITAL CORPORATION, corner Herrick and Heather Sts., 
Beverly. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

John L. Saltonstall, President; Roland W. Boyden, Secretary; 
Augustus P. Loring, Treasurer; Alice C. S. Cushman, R.N., 
Superintendent. 

General hospital. 



10 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 51 (including 24 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,093; number 
of free patients, 451; total number of hospital days during year, 
14,605; number of free days, 5,314. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Patients' payments . 


$21,835 30 


Administration 


$5,820 56 


Voluntary contributions . 


20,398 84 


Professional care of patients 


7,404 55 


Interest, dividends and rentals 


3,260 27 


Department expenses 


23,495 10 


Unrestricted legacies 


5,000 00 


General house and property ex- 




District nurse . 


316 93 


penses 


5,843 37 


Special nurses 


1,298 00 


District work . 


926 41 


William Endicott fund 


1,810 65 


Merchandise on hand 


264 80 






Endicott fund . 

Total hospital expenses . 


1,359 13 




$45,113 92 






Medical and surgical supplies 
Total expenses 


3,130 27 




$48,244 19 






Income invested 


224 28 






Transferred to capital 


5,000 00 






Cash on hand . 


451 52 




$53,919 99 


$53,919 99 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$173,239.78; value of investments, $134,030.25. 



FISHER CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 171 Cabot St., Beverly. (Incorporated 

1809.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

William R. Driver, President; Arthur K. Story, Secretary; 
Rodney C. Larcom, Treasurer. 

To aid the worthy poor of Beverly. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number of families aided, 114. 



Dr. 

Income from investments 



$3,070 45 



$3,070 45 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $200 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 11 95 

Trustees' orders (aid) . . . 1,779 80 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



. $1,991 75 
. 1,078 70 

$3,070 45 



Value of investments, $56,483.70. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



11 



NEW ENGLAND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR DEAF MUTES, 283 Elliott 
St., Beverly. (Incorporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Dudley L. Pickman, President; Albert Boyden, Clerk; Benja- 
min A. Patch, Treasurer; Louise Upham, Superintendent. 
Education of the deaf (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number aided during year, 30, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Income from investments . 

Collections 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 

State of New Hampshire . 

Miscellaneous . . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$1,240 00 
2,585 00 
1,089 00 
3,500 00 
2,300 00 
262 42 

$10,976 42 
3,110 00 

6 81 



$14,093 23 



Cr. 



Salaries and commissions . 


$5,270 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


157 98 


Provisions and supplies 


3,348 88 


Heat, light and power 


922 60 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs • . 


444 72 


Miscellaneous .... 


171 16 



Total current expenses 
Repaid loans . 
Cash on hand . 



$10,315 34 

3,250 00 

527 89 

$14,093 23 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, $81,645.08. 



OLD LADIES' HOME SOCIETY, 12 Lovett St., Beverly. (Incorporated 

1885.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Miss Lizzie F. Creesy, President; Mrs. Mary A. Norwood, 
Secretary; Edward S. Webber, Treasurer; Mrs. Hattie A. Shaw, 
Matron. 

Home for aged women at least sixty years of age, residents of 
Beverly for ten years. Admission fee, $100. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 6. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $400 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 457 72 

Annuities and bequests to income 1,250 00 

Income from investments . . 1,608 12 

Miscellaneous . . . . 77 14 

Total current receipts . . $3,792 98 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 169 91 



$3,962 89 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, fight and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs ,. 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$875 22 

11 70 
632 96 
210 66 

236 64 
42 18 



$2,009 36 

1,756 74 

196 79 

$3,962 89 



12 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
>,000; value of investments, $33,677.24. 



Boston. 

ADAMS NERVINE ASYLUM, 990 Centre St., Jamaica Plain. (Incorpo- 
rated 1877.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Henry Parkman, President; Bernard C. Weld, Secretary; Charles 
L. DeNormandie, Treasurer; Rachael Bourke, Matron and Super- 
intendent of Nurses. 

Care and relief of indigent, debilitated and nervous persons, 
not insane, inhabitants of Massachusetts, and of other persons 
not indigent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 65. 

Number of beds, 50. 

Number aided during year, 250, viz., 77 paying, 103 partly 
paying, 70 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$22,549 86 

38,230 28 

466 97 

$61,247 11 
3,884 80 

3,928 12 



$69,060 03 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs . ' . 
Water and ice . 
Medicine and apparatus . 

Stable 

Insurance . . . 

Miscellaneous . ... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$22,138 34 

118 97 

20,448 09 

5,606 19 

10,044 99 

1,554 24 

687 01 

824 15 

534 19 

2,150 25 



$64,106 42 
4,953 61 

$69,060 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$120,000; value of investments, $839,944.46. 



AMERICAN INVALID AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON, 73 Tremont St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

Hon. Louis C. Southard, President; Mrs. E. W. Waite, Secre- 
tary; A. B. Upham, Treasurer. 

To assist incipient consumptives, and others who are in danger 
of becoming tuberculous, to recover their health. Incurable cases 
are occasionally aided. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 296. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



13 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $3,560 44 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 163 41 



$3,723 85 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Rent 

Telephone 
Aid given . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$710 00 

126 58 

405 00 

50 41 

2,103 15 

49 90 

$3,445 04 
278 81 

$3,723 85 



Value of investments, $238. 

ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE, 51 Carver St., Boston. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Huntington Smith, President; Mrs. Arthur T. Cabot, 
Secretary; Livingston Cushing, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary A. Kelly, 
Superintendent. 

The care of homeless and neglected animals. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 24. 

Number of animals rescued during year, 38,509. 



Dr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$5,460 40 


Bequests .... 


38,159 80 


Income from investments and 




rents ..... 


4,608 89 


Annual fair .... 


5,070 99 


Donations for rescuing animals . 


5,188 21 


Miscellaneous .... 


757 47 



Total current receipts . . $59,245 76 

Gain on bonds sold and ex- 
changed .... 247 50 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 9,402 70 



$68,895 96 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies . ■ 

Humane publications 

Heat, light and power 

Improvements and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Ambulance and motor cars 

Pine Ridge fund 

Taxes, water rates, advertising, 
telephone, etc. 

Branch work, horse rescue, etc. 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Investment of bequests 
Cash on hand . 



$18,245 10 

728 80 

626 90 

860 80 

1,145 88 

1,806 62 

1,532 82 

915 71 

1,129 60 
1,799 18 
1,411 86 

$30,203 27 
27,242 75 
11,449 94 

$68,895 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$63,992.67; value of investments, $64,891.92. 



ARMY NURSE ASSOCIATION OP MASSACHUSETTS, G. A. R. Head- 
quarters, State House, Boston. (Incorporated 1897.) 

Report for year ending June 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Fanny T. Hazen, President; Mrs. Margaret Hamilton, 
Secretary; Mrs. Lovisa B. Downs, Treasurer, 



14 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



To assist needy nurses in Massachusetts who served in the army 
hospitals during the civil war. 
Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 



$269 01 



Cr. 



Donations $128 30 

Membership dues . . . 8 00 


Aid to beneficiaries 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 


. $32 00 
49 90 


Total current receipts . . $136 30 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 132 71 


. $81 90 
. 187 11 



$269 01 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF BOSTON, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

John F. Moors, President; Fred R. Johnson, General Secretary; 
Henry B. Cabot, Treasurer. 

To raise the needy above relief, diminish pauperism, aid the 
poor to help themselves, secure harmonious action of the charities 
of Boston, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 55. 

Families dealt with during year, 4,071; homeless men dealt 
with, 585; expenditure from special relief account, $40,092.39. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come . 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



$41,425 49 



1,000 00 

7,809 17 

452 26 

$50,686 92 
6,313 02 



$56,999 94 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages: — 

Administration 

Confidential exchange . 

Districts 

Special departments 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Heat, power and light 
Telephone 

Rent and care of offices 
League for preventive work 
Accounting and auditing books 
Car fares 
Miscellaneous . 
General expenses, special de 

partments 



$10,262 14 

6,546 89 

24,716 86 

2,739 10 

3,388 01 
501 92 

2,456 95 

3,097 73 
300 00 
350 00 
675 38 

1,283 99 

680 97 
$56,999 94 



Value of investments, $204,818.55. 



ASSOCIATION FOR THE WORK OP MERCY IN THE DIOCESE OP MAS- 
SACHUSETTS, 244 Townsend St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Miss Catherine A. Codman, President; Mrs. Malcolm Storer, 
Secretary; Leverett S. Tuckerman, Treasurer; Miss Mary H. 
Burgess, Head Worker. 

Rescue and relief of fallen women, and charitable work con- 
nected therewith. Without restriction or admission fees. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



15 



Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 87, viz., 22 paying, 40 partly 
ing, 25 free. 



pay- 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From entertainment - 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,248 96 

5,274 92 

734 13 

443 75 

144 09 

$7,845 85 

200 00 

50 72 



$8,096 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 
pli 



Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 
Insurance 
Outside work 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Repayment of loan 
Cash on hand . 



$2,200 68 

142 59 

3,690 13 

659 19 

177 19 
123 97 
550 63 

$7,544 38 
142 13 
300 00 
110 06 

$8,096 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$17,250; value of investments, $17,146.32. 

ASSOCIATION OF THE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH FOR 
WORKS OF MERCY, Baker St., West Roxbury. (Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Adolf H. Biewend, President; Rev. J. F. Pfeiffer, Secre- 
tary; Emil Reichenbach, Treasurer; Rev. and Mrs. A. H. Winter, 
Superintendent and Matron. 

To aid orphans and half-orphans (boys and girls) of three 
years and over (German Lutheran preferred), under the name of 
Martin Luther Orphans' Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 38, viz., 8 partly paying, 30 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From industries 
From board 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . ... 



$1,314 75 

2,378 87 

325 77 

5,710 52 

698 90 

171 84 

$10,600 65 
1,000 00 

302 00 



$11,902 65 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $6,000 06 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . . . . . 56 52 

Provisions and supplies . . 2,841 92 
Heat, light and power . . 606 32 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 133 68 

Farm expenses . . . 562 53 

Printing department . . 1,200 35 

Water taxes .... 85 13 

Fire insurance .... 129 99 

Miscellaneous .... 95 35 

Total current expenses . . $11,711 85 

Cash on hand .... 190 80 

$11,902 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, $14,464.50. 



16 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ASSOCIATION OF THE HAWTHORNE CLUB, 3 and 4 Garland St., Boston, 
Hawthorne Club Country House, Wellesley. (Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Miss Lilian V. Robinson, President; Mrs. Robert Grant, Secre- 
tary; Charles E. Stratton, Treasurer; Miss Ellen Meehan, Superin- 
tendent of Country House; Miss Stephens, Superintendent of Play- 
ground. 

Educational and social work in the neighborhood (especially 
among children). Classes in industrial training. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year; 200 in classes; 1,000 in playground. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $73 07 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,933 70 

Income from investments . . 185 15 

Total current receipts . . $3,191 92 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4,074 16 



$7,266 08 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent . . . . 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Miscellaneous .... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$704 41 

1,266 00 

843 00 

132 00 

419 95 

64 25 

. $3,429 61 
. 3,836 47 

$7,266 08 



Value of investments, $1,539. 



BABY HYGIENE ASSOCIATION, 296 Boylston St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1910.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1916. 

Charles E. Mason, Chairman; Benjamin Loring Young, Secre- 
tary; F. Abbot Goodhue, Treasurer; Dr. J. Herbert Young, 
Director. 

To improve the general milk supply, to encourage breast feed- 
ing, to furnish advice and training in hygiene and the care of 
babies. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 18. 

Number aided during year, 4,792, all partly paying. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



17 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $22,808 41 

Income from investments . . 193 38 

Benefit recital .... 2,158 21 

Sale of supplies . . . 428 31 

Advertisements in report . . 468 00 

Sale of milk .... 9,943 19 



Total current receipts 

Cosh on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$35,999 50 
274 39 



$36,273 89 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, -postage and telephone 

Laundry and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat and light 

Expenses of benefit recital 

Office equipment 

Car fare, express and messenger 

service .... 
Interest on loan 
Report .... 
Milk .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Repayment of loan . 
Cash on hand . 



$19,897 57 
1,810 74 
750 70 
411 50 
186 58 
390 50 
88 15 

251 49 

16 46 

410 95 

10,040 76 

240 12 

$34,495 52 

500 00 

1,278 37 

$36,273 89 



Value of investments, $10,000. 

BARNARD MEMORIAL, 10 Warrenton St., Boston. (Incorporated 1863.) 
Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

John S. Richardson, President; Edward A. Talbot, Secretary; 
Frank T. Vose, Treasurer; Rev. Paul H. Drake, Superintendent. 

Moral, religious and industrial training of children by means of 
classes, meetings and personal work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27 (including choir of 14). 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $196 36 

Annuities and bequests to income 244 23 

Income from investments . . 5,034 32 

Miscellaneous .... 474 71 



Total current receipts . . $5,949 62 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,236 41 



$7,186 03 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$3,235 75 


Printing, postage and office 


sup- 




plies .... 




298 52 


Heat, light and power 




543 25 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


743 87 


Painting and repairs to auditorium 


*962 87 


Signs for advertising . 




110 60 


Charity .... 




140 82 


Entertainments . 




243 84 


Sunday school . 




143 54 


Miscellaneous . 




249 15 


Total current expenses 


$6,672 21 


Income invested 




50 00 


Cash on hand 




463 82 



$7,186 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$69,600; value of investments, $117,275.94. 



BENEFICIENT SOCIETY OF THE NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF 
MUSIC, New England Conservatory, Huntington Ave., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Isabella B. Bond, President; Mrs. Elizabeth C. Allen, 
Secretary; Mrs. Helen H. Dunham, Treasurer. 



18 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



To aid needy and deserving students of the conservatory by 
lending them money without interest. 
Number aided during year, 12. 



Dr. 

Donations 

Income from investments . 

Annual dues 

Returned loans . 

Entertainment . 


$15 00 
240 37 
508 10 
632 00 

747 40 


Cr. 
Printing and postage . 
Loans to beneficiaries 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 


$12 70 
. 1,312 oS 


. $1,324 75 
. 2,440 22 


Total current receipts . . $2,142 87 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,622 10 






$3,764 97 


$3,764 97 



Value of investments, $5,730. 



THE BERKELEY INFIRMARY, 44 Dwight St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1905.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Edward K. Hall, President; Winthrop A. Griffin, Secretary; 
George H. Nutting, Treasurer; Frances B. Mayer, Superintendent. 

To care for the sick poor, irrespective of nationality or creed. 
To advance the knowledge of preventive medicine and of the 
care of disease among the poor. 

Number of paid employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 2,292, viz., 1,632 partly paying, 660 
free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$2,314 16 


Salaries and wages 


$1,021 32 


Sale of medicine, etc. 


1,133 99 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Criterion Club, benefit 


256 00 


plies .... 


133 24 


Miscellaneous .... 


1 84 


Medicine and medical supplies 


592 51 






House expenses 


340 84 






Total current receipts 


$3,705 99 


Heat, light and power 


231 47 


Notes payable .... 


1,000 00 


Telephone 


112 92 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


3 71 


Real estate 


546 00 






Notes payable . 


1,000 00 






Interest, insurance and taxes 


391 25 






Land court, registration title 


57 00 






Hospital and nurses . 
Total current expenses 


180 15 




$4,606 70 






Hospital and loan fund 


51 00 






Cash on hand . 


52 00 




$4,709 70 


$4,709 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500; amount of mortgage on same, $4,500; value of invest- 
ments, $155.33. 



Part II] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



19 



BETHANY UNION FOR YOUNG WOMEN, 14 Worcester St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Arthur E. Mason, President; E. Benjamin Armstrong, Secre- 
tary; Henry C. Wiley, Treasurer; Miss Ruth E. Hersey, Matron. 

To furnish a safe and comfortable home for Protestant young 
women earning small wages. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 61. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $8,598 29 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,667 10 

Income from investments . . 415 07 

Total current receipts . . $10,680 46 

Account principal mortgage note 100 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,579 02 



$13,359 48 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Aid to outside beneficiary 

Laundry 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,516 43 

77 13 
3,618 23 
1,184 99 

1,152 22 
260 00 
225 97 
132 38 
174 31 

$9,341 66 

500 00 

3,517 82 

$13,359 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$27,100; amount of mortgage on same, $2,500; value of invest- 
ments, $6,000. 

BOARD OF MINISTERIAL AID, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1869.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Hon. Arthur H. Wellman, President; Arthur C. Farley, Secre- 
tary; Charles L. Ziegler, Treasurer. 

To aid aged, disabled or needy ministers of the Orthodox Con- 
gregational denomination in the Commonwealth, and the widows 
and children of such ministers. 

Number aided during year, 53. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $6,130 75 

Income from investments . . 2,697 60 

Total current receipts . . $8,828 35 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 547 53 



$9,375 88 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Clerical help . 

Grants in aid . 

Contributions to New York So- 
ciety . . . . . 



$48 52 

125 00 

6,645 70 

2,556 66 

$9,375 88 



Value of investments, $63,706.62. 



20 



STATE BOARD OF* CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS, 3 Joy St., Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Arthur K. Stone, M.D., President; Miss Isabel F. Hyams, 
Clerk; Seymour H. Stone, Secretary; George S. Mumford, Treas- 
urer. 

To promote a careful study of conditions regarding tubercu- 
losis in Boston; to educate public opinion as to the causes and 
prevention of tuberculosis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 85, viz., 12 paying, 45 partly 
paying, 28 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


. $2,921 01 


Salaries and wages . 


$7,419 96 


Subscriptions and donations 


8,699 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


419 43 


plies .... 


, 1,132 20 


Red Cross Christmas seals 


2,105 46 


Provisions and supplies 


2,800 61 


Massachusetts Anti-Tuberculo 




Rent .... 


775 05 


sis League (salaries and rent) 


557 00 


Heat, light and power 


337 90 


Prendergast Camp . 


112 44 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Miscellaneous . 


297 80 


pairs .... 


607 49 






Office expenses 


1,532 65 






Travel expenses 


111 75 






Red Cross Christmas seals 


609 58 






Special committees . 


602 42 






Miscellaneous . . . 


362 13 


Total current receipts . 


. $15,112 14 




Cash on hand at beginning 


of 


Total current expenses . 


$16,291 74 


year .... 


2,863 82 


Cash on hand . 


1,684 22 




$17,975 96 


$17,975 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$23,797.89; value of investments, $8,542.95. 



BOSTON BAPTIST SOCIAL UNION, 15 Ashburton PL, Boston. (Incorpo- 
rated 1900.) 

Report for year ending March 1, 1916. 

Fred T. Field, President; James P. Roberts, Secretary; William 
G. Burbeck, Treasurer. 

Religious, charitable and educational work among laymen of 
the Baptist denomination. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 18. 

Number aided during year, 2,462. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



21 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$525 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$11,526 67 


Income from investments . 


768 19 


Printing, postage and office sup 




From trustees . 


. 20,500 00 


plies .... 


65 36 






Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 


200 00 
642 50 


Total current receipts . 


. $21,793 19 


From sale of securities 


2,943 55 


Music 


1,500 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Heat, light and power 


2,057 37 


year .... 


790 13 


Furnishings and incidental re 








pairs .... 


270 00 






Relief fund ... 


1,599 99 






Women's work 


210 00 






Y. W. C. A. . 


400 00 






Y. M. C. A., Ford memorial 


1,161 77 






Ford Hall meetings, etc . . 


5,292 10 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


256 33 




$25,182 09 






Cash on hand . 


344 78 




$25,526 87 


$25,526 87 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$154,000; value of investments, $1,135,602.25. 



BOSTON BRANCH BARON DE HIRSCH FUND, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending January 27, 1916. 

Ferdinand Strauss, President; Edward E. Norton, Secretary; A. 
C. Ratshesky, Treasurer; Mrs. Martha M. Silverman, Superin- 
tendent. 

To instruct Jewish immigrants, assist them to obtain employ- 
ment, and to provide for their removal and settlement in places 
outside of Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 855, viz., 1 paying, 2 partly paying, 
852 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$19 55 


Salaries and wages 


$102 04 


600 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




150 58 


plies . 


32 75 


1 10 


Transportation . 


59 61 




Tools, furniture, etc. . 


13 07 




Treasurer's bond 


7 50 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


341 89 




$556 86 




$771 23 


Income invested 


150 58 


446 40 


Cash on hand .... 


510 19 


$1,217 63 


$1,217 63 



Value of investments, $3,878.11. 



22 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1865.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Horatio A. Lamb, President; J. Prentice Murphy, General 
Secretary; I. Tucker Burr, Treasurer. 

Provides for exposed destitute and wayward children; studies 
questions relating to children; promotes needed legislation and 
encourages co-operation among child-helping societies; takes juve- 
nile offenders on probation; undertakes oversight of children in 
their own homes; places libraries in families. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 35. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 608; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
91; in part, 219; not reimbursed, 227. 

Monthly average number of children under supervision in fos- 
ter homes, 307. 

Number of placing-out visitors, 10. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
From overseers of poor 
From other charitable associa- 
tions .... 
Miscellaneous . 



$13,046 70 
29,464 11 

6,000 00 
30,236 15 

1,455 44 

335 25 
328 70 



Total current receipts . . $80,866 35 

Unrestricted funds appropriated 

to income .... 4,809 47 



$85,675 82 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $31,894 30 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 2,621 94 

Home libraries ... 296 30 

Transportation . . . 3,788 74 
Heat, light, repairs and care of 

office 1,007 40 

Furnishings . . . . 492 52 
Telephone, telegraph and express 978 81 
Legal services .... 200 00 
Auditing and bonding . . 378 50 
Taxes, insurance and fees in con- 
nection with sale of real es- 
tate 1,654 47 

Care of children in families .. 40,826 42 

To other charitable agencies . 470 00 

Annuities .... 500 00 

Miscellaneous .... 566 42 

$85,675 82 



Value of investments, $483,600. 



BOSTON CHILDREN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 48 Rutland St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1834.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Costello C. Converse, President; Mrs. Frank R. Thomas, Clerk; 
William C. Chick, Treasurer; Carrington Howard, General Secre- 
tary. 

Needy and neglected children provided with home life in pri- 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



23 



vate families when impossible to readjust conditions at home; 
children given oversight in their own homes; promotes needed 
legislation. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes and schools for 
special training, 193; the society reimbursed for expense of these, 
exclusive of supervision: in full, 67; in part, 68; not reimbursed, 
58. Monthly average number of children under supervision in 
foster homes, 13 If. Number of children supervised in their own 
homes, including 17 returned to their homes from placing-out 
departments, 72. Number of placing-out visitors, 3 (1 giving 
one-half time). 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$5,051 02 


Salaries and wages . 


. $7,420 46 


Subscriptions and donations 


10,142 69 


Printing, postage and office sup 




Transferred from income, 




plies .... 


1,588 85 


Leighton fund 


1,900 00 


Board and clothing of children 


. 13,607 27 


Income from investments . 


3,949 44 


Medical service 


462 02 


Fair (net) .... 


6,899 53 


Heat, light and water 


143 96 


From charity organizations 




Furnishings and incidental re- 




towards board of special chil- 




pairs .... 


127 73 


dren ..... 


311 62 


Travel of children and visitors 


1,492 41 


From overseers of poor 


721 07 


Telephone 


311 13 


Boards of health 


151 51 


Advertising 


119 70 


Miscellaneous .... 


37 74 


League for Preventive Work 


300 00 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


315 65 




$25,889 18 






Total current receipts . 


$29,164 62 


Loan paid off . 


4,000 00 


Bequests .... 


1,600 00 


Income invested 


200 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Uninvested bequests 


1,400 00 


year ..... 


1,060 92 


Cash on hand . 


336 36 




$31,825 54 


$31,825 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$30,000; value of investments, $130,087.50. 



THE BOSTON CITY HOSPITAL, 818 Harrison Ave., Boston; the South 
Department for Contagious Diseases, 745 Massachusetts Ave., Boston; 
the Relief Stations, Haymarket Sq., Boston, and 14 Porter St., East 
Boston; the Convalescent Home, 2150 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester, 
and the West Department in West Roxbury. (Incorporated 1880.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

A. Shuman, President; Joseph P. Manning, Secretary;' John J. 
Dowling, M.D., Superintendent and Medical Director. 

For the temporary relief of sick or injured persons. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 773 (including 165 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 1,061. 



24 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Total number of hospital patients during year treated in wards, 
20,S93; number of free patients, 96,212; total number of hos- 
pital days during year, 315,834; total number of visits in out- 
patient department during year, 212,009. 



Dr. 



City appropriation . 


$717,080 00 


State patients 


30,966 71 


City and town patients . 


20,564 78 


Private patients 


37,034 45 


Insurance cases 


9,647 24 


Orthopedic appliances 


265 55 


Collection of board of health for 




contagious cases at hospital . 


41,861 45 


Interest from investments 


2,156 22 


Refund overcharge on freight . 


2 48 


Revenue from estate, Massa- 




chusetts Avenue and North- 




ampton Street 


90 00 


Sale of old material 


278 36 


Interest .... 


63 52 


Rent of booth, West Depart- 




ment ..... 


50 00 


Commission on automatic tele- 




phone .... 


29 00 


Birth fees .... 


26 00 


Sale of standing grass, West 




•Department 


15 00 


Total current receipts . 


$860,130 76 


Balance from 1914-15 (as per 




auditor's exhibit) 


12,305 37 




$872,436 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies . 
Drugs and medicine 
Repairs and improvements 
Heating and lighting 
Printing, stationery and post- 
age 

Total hospital expenses 
Paid to city collector 1 



Transferred to police depart- 
ment .... 



$344,472 95 

212,735 15 

68,178 94 

38,983 95 

49,758 08 

10,916 36 

$725,045 43 
141,587 81 

$866,633 24 

5,802 89 



$872,436 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
83,894,800; value of investments, 893,102.37. 



BOSTON COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN, 47 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for j-ear ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Charles E. Wyzanski, President; Miss Anna Pelonsky, 
Secretary; Mrs. I. K. E. Prager, Treasurer. 

To further united efforts in the work of social betterment 
through religion, philanthropy and education. Supplies two per- 
sons for probation work in Boston Juvenile Court and one for 
work among immigrants. 

Xumoer of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 909. 

1 These receipts, consisting of money from paying patients, revenue from estate, Massachusetts 
Avenue and Northampton Street, sale of old material, interest on bank deposits, commission on 
automatic telephone, birth registration fees, rent of booth, West Department, and sale of standing 
grass, West Department, and the unexpended balance, amounting to $141,587.81, were paid to the 
city collector, and were not available for hospital expenses. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



25 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Religious schools 
Members' dues . 
Interest .... 
Sale of cook books 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning 
year 



. $4,283 41 

254 27 

. 1,480 00 

29 95 

2 04 

. $6,049 67 



of 



945 85 



$6,995 52 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




. $3,032 87 


Printing, postage and office sup 




plies . . ... 


121 97 


Rent .... 


396 25 


National Council dues 


240 00 


Automobile, sale expenses . 


553 85 


Year book 


140 00 


Light 




2 65 


Religious schools 




502 55 


Board and clothes 




43 10 


Members' meetings 




170 11 


Telephone 




117 46 


State Federation 




31 70 


City Federation 




3 00 


Conference of Jewish Charities 


10 00 


Conference of Charities and Cor 




rection .... 


3 00 


To Denver hospitals . 


58 00 


Commission 


3 70 


Miscellaneous 


105 61 


Total current expenses 


$5,535 82 


Interest added to sinking fund 


4 00 


Cash on hand . 


1,455 70 




$6,995 52 



BOSTON DISPENSARY, 25 Bennet St., Boston. (Incorporated 1801.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Edward R. Warren, President; Edward C. Streeter, Secretary; 
Ashton L. Carr, Treasurer; Michael M. Davis, Jr., Director. 

To afford medical advice and relief to the sick poor, provide 
medicines, and assist in educational and remedial efforts for the 
prevention of disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 91 (including 11 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds (children's hospital only), 25; total num- 
ber of hospital patients during year, 318; total number of hos- 
pital days during year, 7,712; total number of visits in out-patient 
department during year, 122,776; total number aided outside in- 
stitution, 6,844. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries 


$38,586. 26 


Subscriptions and donations 


. 16,303 50 


Annuities and bequests to income 


3,000 00 


Income from investments . 


14,296 21 


From real estate 


300 00 


Payments for work done for othei 




agencies 


5,195 35 


Rebate on bank tax . 


481 12 


Miscellaneous ... 


187 80 


Total current receipts . 


$78,350 24 


Loans to income 


18,509 60 


Cash on hand at beginning oi 




year .... 


1,039 55 




$97,899 39 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$57,521 86 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


5,668 18 


Provisions and supplies 


17,206 60 


Heat, light and power 


5,901 12 


Drugs and chemicals 


8,806 39 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs . . . . . 


2,795 24 



$97,899 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$200,000; value of investments, $294,600. 



26 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON EPISCOPAL CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 89 Franklm>t., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1784.) 

Report for year ending March 15, 1916. 

Francis W. Hunnewell, President; Charles E. Mason, Secretary; 
John S. Lawrence, Treasurer. 

The relief of persons who are or have been members of this 
society and their families, the widows and minor children of 
persons who at the time of their decease shall have been minis- 
ters of an Episcopal church within this Commonwealth, and of 
persons who belong to the Protestant Episcopal Church and are 
inhabitants of the city of Boston. 

Number aided during year, 62. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $6,436 82 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,286 51 



$7,723 33 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . . . 
Rent of safe . . . . 
Quarterly grants 
Interest . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$19 48 

10 00 

6,170 00 

27 22 

$6,226 70 
1,496 63 

$7,723 33 



Value of investments, $142,156.07. 



BOSTON FATHERLESS AND WIDOWS' SOCIETY, 1145 Old South Build- 
ing, Boston. (Incorporated 1837.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Maria H. Gordon, President; Miss Emily L. Croswell, 
Secretary; Thomas J. Emery, Treasurer. 
To help widows and orphans. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 144. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions .... 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$154 00 

2,288 18 

8,037 06 

191 61 

$10,670 85 

3,380 52 



$14,051 37 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $600 00 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 53 40 

Box in Old Colony Safe Deposit 

vaults . . . . . 20 00 

To trustees for distribution . 9,506 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 30 07 

Total current expenses . . $10,209 47 

Cash on hand .... 3,841 90 

$14,051 37 



Value of investments, $153,525. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



27 



BOSTON FLOATING HOSPITAL, 54 Devonshire St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Edward W. Pope, Chairman of Trustees; William H. Brainerd, 
Clerk; George C. Lee, Treasurer; G. Loring Briggs, Manager. 

Care of children under five years suffering from summer dis- 
eases; instruction of mothers in care of children; training of doc- 
tors and nurses, and scientific study of children's diseases. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 155. 

Total number of beds, 240; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 1,766; total number of hospital days during year, 
14,501, all free. 



Dr. 

Voluntary contributions . . $48,498 33 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 4,374 12 

Total receipts . . . $52,872 45 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 7,569 66 



$60,442 11 



Cr. 
Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses, general 
house and property expenses . 
Miscellaneous .... 



Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$8,128 48 
26,151 01 

16,293 61 
1,120 23 

. $51,693 33 

8,748 78 

$60,442 11 



Value of boat used for corporate purposes, $175,193.72; value 
of investments, $184,661.38. 



BOSTON HEBREW LADIES' AID ASSOCIATION, 995 Washington St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Annie Wilson, President; Jacob Hirsch, Secretary; Rachel 
Sheinberg, Treasurer. 

To give pecuniary aid to the poor of the Hebrew faith. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided during year, 250. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Dues .... 



$159 40 
238 29 



Total current receipts . . $397 69 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 50 00 



$447 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $27 50 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 28 04 

Provisions and supplies . . 255 93 

Rent 25 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 1 12 

Total current expenses . . $337 59 

Cash on hand . . . 110 10 

$447 69 



28 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON HOME FOR INCURABLES, 2049 Dorchester Ave., Dorchester. 

(Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

E. Pierson Beebe, President; J. Grafton Minot, Secretary; Emor 
H. Harding, Treasurer; Miss Marion W. Parsons, Superintendent. 

A home for the care and treatment of women and children 
afflicted with an incurable disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27. 

Number aided during year, 56, viz., 14 partly paying, 42 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Bequests .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$1,286 50 


1,832 


00 


27,717 


72 


261 


21 


$31,097 43 


66,000 00 


59 


21 







Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power , . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 

Insurance . . 

Advertising 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$97,156 64 



$10,486 55 

89 76 
5,499 88 
1,833 81 

1,841 39 

90 53 
206 64 
540 77 

$20,589 33 

76,546 81 

20 50 

$97,156 64 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$52,700; value of investments, $630,326.94. 



BOSTON INDUSTRIAL HOME, 17 Davis St., Boston. (Incorporated 1877.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915". 

Rev. George L. Cady, President; Robert W. Hastings, M.D., 
Secretary; Charles D. Bagnall, Treasurer; Oliver C. Elliot, Super- 
intendent. 

To provide a home for worthy people out of employment until 
they can obtain situations. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 

Number aided during year, 2,468, all partly paying. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



29 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from home funds . 
Income from special funds 
From sale of coal and wood 
Interest .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year .... 



Cr. 



$4,685 87 


Salaries and wages . 


$5,581 21 


477 00 


Printing, postage and office sup 




326 00 


plies .... 


428 15 


1,326 94 


Provisions and supplies 


4,961 06 


36,412 84 


Coal and wood 


26,262 30 


17 90 


Electric light and gas 


741 97 




- Incidental repairs 


662 25 




$43,246 55 


Paid for transient labor . » 


1,160 32 


1,489 66 


Water rates and insurance 


297 25 




Stable maintenance . 


1,308 93 


1,680 68 


Advertising and telephone 


332 41 




On account special funds . 


1,634 31 




Interest on loans and mortgage 


830 00 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


261 58 




$44,461 74 




Cash on hand . 


1,955 15 


$46,416 89 


$46,416 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$55,300; amount of mortgage on same, $15,000; value of invest- 
ments, $37,173.18. 



BOSTON LADIES' BETHEL SOCIETY, 8 North Bennet St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending January 26, 1916. 

Miss Susie P. Tuckerman, President; Mrs. F. F. Gerrish, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Sarah L. Jones, Treasurer; Mr. and Mrs. E. Welch, 
Superintendent and Matron. 

To assist in maintenance of worship in Baptist Bethel Church 
and provide a home for worthy seamen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 1,280, viz., 642 paying, 138 partly 
paying, 500 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$1,701 79 


Salaries and wages 


$610 50 


Subscriptions and donations 


130 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




From entertainments 


101 74 


plies ...... 


60 67 






Provisions and supplies 


842 81 






Total current receipts 


$1,933 53 


Rent . 


59 85 


Loans from funds 


287 92 


Heat, light and power 


159 31 


Transferred from sinking funds . 


406 80 


Repairs and plumbing 


482 68 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


12 07 


Return on loan .... 


64 45 






Miscellaneous . . . . 
Total current expenses 


346 97 




$2,627 24 






Cash on hand . . . . 


13 08 




$2,640 32 


$2,640 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,000; value of investments, $41.06. 



30 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON LEGAL AID SOCIETY, 39 Court St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1900.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Albert F. Bigelow, President; Herbert B. Ehrmann, Secretary; 
Dudley L. JPickman, Jr., Treasurer; Reginald Heber Smith, 
Co unsel-in- C hief. 

To provide legal aid for those who through poverty are other- 
wise unable to secure it. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 2,608, viz., 1,142 partly paying, 
1,426 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $5,464 00 

Interest 38 77 

From 732 retaining fees . . 367 40 
From 451 fees for services . . 1,354 73 
From Boston Children's Aid So- 
ciety for services . . . 200 00 



Total current receipts . . $7,424 90 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,488 09 



$8,912 99 



CV. 
Salaries and wages . . . $4,458 16 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 967 23 

Rent 610 00 

Heat, light and power . . 14 90 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . 49 30 
Telephone . . . 293 37 
Expense of Utigation . . . 153 27 
Insurance . . . . 4 71 
Miscellaneous .... 260 89 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$6,811 83 
2,101 16 



$8,912 99 



BOSTON LYING-IN HOSPITAL, 24 McLean St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1832.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

William L. Richardson, President; William D. Sohier, Secretary; 
James R. Hooper, Treasurer; Miss Charlotte W. Dana, Superin- 
tendent. 

The care of poor and deserving women in childbirth. Regular 
charges for patients: residents of Boston, $30; nonresidents, $40; 
deserving needy persons, free. No charges for out-patient at- 
tendance. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 54 (including 23 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 47; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 924; number of free patients, 338; total number of 
hospital days during year, 15,800.4. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



31 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . $13,418 50 
Payments by city of Boston for 

care of 26 cases . 630 00 

Voluntary contributions . . 9,322 10 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 16,183 40 

Registration fees . . . 704 00 

Annuity 1,000 00 

Miscellaneous .... 238 57 

Total hospital receipts . . $41,496 57 

Gift for pregnancy clinic . . 250 00 

Total receipts . . . $41,746 57 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . . . . 1,396 90 

Transfer from unrestricted capi- 
tal cash to make up deficit . 1,577 49 



$44,720 96 



Cr. 



Administration 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses .... 
Miscellaneous .... 


$682 55 
34,141 80 

9,125 94 
368 22 


Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 


$44,318 51 
402 45 



$44,720 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$168,181.64; value of investments, $352,828.35. 



THE BOSTON MUSIC SCHOOL SETTLEMENT, 110 Salem St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Prof. Walter R. Spalding, President; Daniel Bloomfield, Secre- 
tary and Associate Director; Mrs. A. Lincoln Filene, Treasurer. 

To give to children of limited means an opportunity to secure 
a good musical education under proper settlement influences. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 28. 



Number aided during year, 406, viz., 
paying, 150 free. 



246 paying, 10 partly 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 



Music 

Instruments and supplies 

Summer outing fund . 

Concerts . 

People's orchestra 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . 



$2,475 00 


1,584 


20 


194 95 


138 


64 


173 


01 


1,507 


15 


92 


70 


116 


47 


$6,282 


12 


1,904 


80 







$8,186 92 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $4,086 11 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 193 36 
Instruments and supplies . . 136 19 
Heat, light and power . . 53 14 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 93 44 
People's orchestra . . . 240 50 
Summer outing fund . . . 107 03 

Concerts 686 35 

Music 206 32 

Miscellaneous .... 373 53 

Total current expenses . . $6,175 97 

Cash on hand .... 2,010 95 

$8,186 92 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON NEWSBOYS' CLUB, 277 "Fremont St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1909.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

Nathan L. Amster, President; Alexander I. Peckham, Secretary; 
James J. Storrow, Treasurer; Edward L. Curran, Superintendent. 

To befriend in every possible way the newsboys and other boys 
of the city of Boston, without distinction as to race, color or 
creed. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 616. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $5,750 00 

Interest ..... 1 04 

Total current receipts . . $5,751 04 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 493 99 



$6,245 03 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Camp at Halifax 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$3,564 23 

41 47 
692 04 

17 45 
532 95 
516 94 

$5,365 08 
879 95 

$6,245 03 



Value of investments, $1,500.24. 



BOSTON NORTH END MISSION, 300 Tremont Temple, Boston. Home, 
corner Bourne St. and Southbourne Rd. , Roslindale. (Incorporated 1870.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles W. Kidder, President; Albert D. Auryansen, Secretary; 
William H. Bain, Treasurer. 

Temporary home for care and training of destitute children 
(boys and girls); placing out; supervising; some received under 
guardianship and custody for adoption. Religious but non-sec- 
tarian. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 75; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these exclusive of supervision: in full, 
14; in part, 6; not reimbursed, 55. Monthly average number of 
children under supervision in foster homes, 65. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 1. 

Number of children cared for in Mount Hope Home, 36; the 
society reimbursed: in part, 28; not reimbursed, 8. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



33 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $3,556 74 

Subscriptions and donations . 5,607 60 

Income from investments . . 2,338 68 

Persons aided .... 3,467 92 

Total current receipts . . $14,970 94 

Loans to income . . . 8,000 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year .... 



271 56 



$23,242 50 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$6,303 60 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


710 21 


Provisions and supplies 


3,816 09 


Rent ..... 


381 21 


Heat, light and power 


782 36 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


943 15 


Board and clothing of children 




in outside homes and visiting 




expenses .... 


2,647 37 


Miscellaneous .... 


217 30 


Total current expenses . 


$15,801 29 


Payment of loans 


6,000 00 


Invested .... 


450 00 


Taxes, repairs and water rates for 




real estate not used for cor- 




porate purposes 


239 76 


Cash on hand .... 


751 45 




$23,242 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$16,000; value of investments, $45,566.10. 



BOSTON NURSERY FOR BLIND BABIES, 147 South Huntington Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 11, 1916. 

Horace G. Allen, President; Bessie J. Daniel, Clerk; Mrs. Mar- 
guerite S. Hopkins, Treasurer; Miss Jane A. Russell, Superintend- 
ent. 

Care and treatment of blind children under five years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 38, viz., 20 partly paying, 18 free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$540 75 


Salaries and wages . . 


$3,711 41 


Subscriptions and donations 


2,139 59 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Annuities and bequests to income 


2,200 00 


plies . . . . 


763 17 


Income from investments . 


4,507 16 


Provisions and supplies 


1,534 59 


From Blind Babies' Aid Society 




Heat, light and power' 


939 78 


for maintenance 


4,000 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




For milk .... 


902 34 


pairs ..... 


350 79 






Milk 

Telephone .... 


902 34 
42 49 


Total current receipts . 


$14,289 84 


On deposit for investment 


12,258 82 


Water and taxes ... 


256 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 










year 


1,188 73 


Total current expenses . 


$8,500 57 






Income invested 


18,640 55 






Cash on hand .... 


596 27 




$27,737 39 


$27,737 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,400; value of investments, $79,500. 



34 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON PORT AND SEAMEN'S AID SOCIETY, MANAGERS OP, 11 North 
Sq., Boston. (Incorporated 1829 and 1867.) 

Report for year ending January 24, 1916. 

Rev. George A. Gordon, D.D., President; John A. Bennett, 
Secretary; Lewis R. Tucker, Treasurer; Capt. Joseph P. Hatch, 
Superintendent. 

Improving the moral, religious and general condition of seamen 
and their families in Boston and its vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year in institution, 10,372, viz., 7,761 
paying, 121 partly paying, 2,490 free; outside institution, 40, all 
free; number of families aided, 10. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



$9,722 59 

1,950 00 

16,204 70 

$27,877 29 

4,877 02 



$32,754 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and telephone . 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Charity .... 

Fishermen's reading room 

Entertainments 

Taxes and insurance 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$7,830 63 

955 87 
6,544 68 
1,405 96 

952 30 
2,672 00 
2,003 16 
677 86 
370 32 
198 25 

$23,611 03 
5,016 67 
4,126 61 



$32,754 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$39,500; value of investments, $381,750. 



BOSTON PROVIDENT ASSOCIATION, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1854.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Russell G. Fessenden, President; William Hedge, Secretary; 
Thomas B. Gannett, Treasurer; William H. Pear, General Agent. 

The relief of needy families, the suppression of street beggary 
and the improvement of the conditions of the poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 4,757, including 585 men dealt 
with by the Welfare Committee for Men; number of families 
aided, 938. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



35 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



Cr. 



$755 68 


Salaries and wages . 


$12,321 46 


7,856 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




1,950 00 


plies . . . . . . 


395 05 


26,726 71 


Provisions, supplies and cash re- 






lief 

Rent 


24,018 31 
180 00 


$37,288 39 


1,476 95 


Heat, light and power 


397 93 




Travel and telephone 


426 38 


60 54 


Confidential Exchange 


250 00 




Public accountant 


67 00 




League for Preventive Work 


200 00 




Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


559 88 




$38,816 01 




Cash on hand .... 


9 87 


$38,825 88 


$38,825 88 



Value of investments, $542,104.25. 

BOSTON SEAMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 287 Hanover St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1829.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Samuel Usher, President; Charles F. Stratton, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Rev. James McD. Blue, Chaplain. 

Ministering to the spiritual, social, moral and temporal wants 
and needs of seamen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 256. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $6,264 93 

Annuities and bequests to income 4,453 27 

Income from investments . . 6,936 05 



Total current receipts . 




$17,654 25 


Bond sold 






1,040 00 


Cash on hand 


at beginning 


of 




year 






2,232 77 



$20,927 02 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $8,334 08 
Printing, postage, advertising 

and office supplies . . 1,253 53 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,228 54 

Rent 164 50 

Heat, light and power . . 1,147 47 
Maintenance of launch at Boston 663 99 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 10 61 
Expense of publishing "Sea 

Breeze" .... 180 95 

Mission at Vineyard Haven . 3,378 96 
Reading room at Tarpaulin 

Cove 161 75 

Aid to destitute seamen . . 478 41 

Interest and annuities . . 436 85 

Sprinkler system and fire escape 861 58 

Miscellaneous . . . . 17 95 

Total current expenses . . $18,319 17 

Bond 984 58 

Cash on hand .... 1,623 27 

$20,927 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, $105,348. 



36 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BOSTON SOCIETY FOR THE CARE OF GIRLS, 184 Boylston St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1803.) 

Report for year ending October 25, 1916. 

Miss Abby M. Storer, President; Mrs. Arthur H. Nichols, Sec- 
retary; Miss Sarah C. Paine, Treasurer; Miss Mabelle B. Blake, 
General Secretary. 

Care and supervision of girls, irrespective of age, race or color. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 226; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
35; in part, 155; not reimbursed, 36. Supervised in their own 
homes, 52. Monthly average number of children under super- 
vision in foster homes, 208. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



. §3,169 64 

180 00 

. 24,818 01 

3 00 

. $28,170 65 
5,815 68 



of 



2,458 44 



836,444 77 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent 

Telephone . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 

Board of children 

Traveling expenses 

Doctors, dentists, 
medical care 

Contributions to 
Charities and 
League 

Expenses of scholar at Framing 
ham Normal School . 

Interest and commission . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



glasses and 

Associated 
Preventive 



S9.802 34 

515 65 

4,121 17 

1,164 00 

541 33 

58 80 

9,123 37 

1,715 13 

855 70 



250 00 

160 00 

57 47 

815 62 

$29,180 58 
5,912 50 
1,351 69 

$36,444 77 



Value of investments, $530,934.35. 



BOSTON SOCIETY OF DECORATIVE ART, 555 Boylston St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Henry Forbes Bigelow, President; Ellen T. Bullard, Secretary; 
Boylston Adams Beal, Treasurer; Miss Marion M. Shaw, Super- 
intendent. 

To raise the standard of art needlework and provide for the 
sale of contributors' handiwork. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



37 



Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 
Number aided during year, 250. 



Dr. 
Dividends 

Sale of bond and interest 
Contributors' sales . 
Contributors' orders 
Workroom orders 
Stock 
Materials 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand . 



$958 54 


1,004 


58 


8,421 


94 


606 


33 


3,360 


07 


5,038 


25 


200 


02 


12 


12 


819,601 


85 


613 


90 


$20,215 


75 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 

Rent 

Contributors and workers 

Materials 

Office expenses 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$4,254 35 
2,421 74 
9,404 44 
1,303 47 
1,290 69 

$18,674 69 
1,541 06 



$20,215 75 



Value of investments, $21,959.82. 



BOSTON UNITED MOATH CHITIM ASSOCIATION, 34 School St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Levi Herman, President; Morris L. Morrison, Secretary; Solo- 
mon J. Goldings, Treasurer. 

To assist the Jewish poor of Boston and vicinity in the proper 
observance of the Passover. 

Number of paid employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 4,500; families aided, 779. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Cash on hand . 



$4,388 63 
6 12 



$4,394 75 



Cr. 
To assistant secretary 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Cash donations to poor 
Typewriting 
Investigation expense 
Teaming . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$60 00 

62 90 
1,793 67 
2,134 10 

15 00 
111 50 

56 03 

$4,233 20 
161 55 

$4,394 75 



BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 314-324 Hunting- 
ton Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1852 and 1887.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Arthur S. Johnson, President; George W. Brainard, Secretary; 
Lewis A. Crossett, Treasurer. 

The improvement of the spiritual, intellectual, social and physi- 
cal condition of the young men and boys of Boston, and to pro- 
vide dormitories with homelike surroundings. 



38 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers, employees and teachers, 273. 
Number aided during year, 13,985, viz., 12,705 paying, 1,280 
free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous 



$295,785 20 

17,941 72 

8,613 00 

510 28 



$322,850 20 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$182,316 72 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


22,708 16 


Heat, light and power 


14,666 08 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


8,031 50 


All other departmental ex- 




penses .... 


94,674 63 


Total current expenses 


$322,397 09 


Invested . 


375 00 


Cash on hand 


78 11 



$322,850 20 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1,409,666; amount of mortgage on same, $200,000; value of in- 
vestments, $232,000. 



BOSTON YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN UNION, 48 Boylston St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1852.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Frank L. Locke, President; Charles L. Burrill, Secretary; Ed- 
ward A. Church, Treasurer. 

Recreation and instruction by means of evening classes, reli- 
gious services, lectures and entertainment. Maintains an employ- 
ment bureau, gymnasium, and committees to visit sick and dis- 
tribute clothing; also a committee on country week and rides for 
invalids. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 55. 

Number aided during year in institution, 5,001, all partly pay- 
ing; outside institution, 3,102. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 

Donations .... 

Income from investments . 

Donations, special charities, 
country week, rides for in- 
valids and Christmas festival . 

Income from special charities 
and Drake fund 


$23,056 56 

5,737 00 

25,423 03 

17,383 43 
3,187 75 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing and postage 
Heat and light 
General administration 
Evening class instruction . 
Special charities 

Total current expenses . 
Balance of revenue over expe 


. $26,609 47 
4,274 49 
5,379 29 

. 14,733 37 
3,140 50 

. 21,396 56 


. $75,533 68 

nse 79 47 


Total current receipts . 
Deficit taken from surplus 


$74,787 77 
825 38 




$75,613 15 


$75,613 15 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$750,000; value of investments, $571,600. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



39 



BOSTON YOUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 40 Berkeley St. 
and 68 Warrenton St., Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Benjamin F. Tenney, President; Miss Abbie W. Covel, 
Secretary; Miss Eleanor H. Jones, 1 Treasurer; Miss Antoinette 
Field, Superintendent of 40 Berkeley St.; Miss Josephine Quimby, 
Superintendent of 68 Warrenton St. 

To promote the temporal, moral and religious welfare of young 
women who are dependent upon their own exertions for support. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 128. 

Number aided during year: in boarding homes, 5,537; placed 
through Employment Bureau, 4,364. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Bequests 

Income from investments 

Memberships 

From schools and homes 

Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loans .... 
Sales of investments 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . 



$3,937 24 
6,700 00 
5,771 81 
1,386 15 
109,051 42 
1,941 65 



$128,788 27 

2,926 40 

12,116 24 

574 44 



$144,405 35 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies . 

Relief and loan 

Heat, light, power, water and 
telephone . 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Paid on mortgages . 

Interest 

Auditing 

Insurance 

Loans to student 

Travelers' aid 

Accounts payable, 1914 . 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Investments ... 
Cash on hand 



$55,097 04 

1,752 76 

41,751 76 

617 20 

10,973 45 

10,187 45 

2,000 00 

1,927 50 

442 80 

1,238 85 

145 55 

913 33 

6,964 58 

5,629 41 



$139,641 68 

4,082 08 

681 59 

$144,405 35 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$232,600; amount of mortgage on same, $38,000; value of invest- 
ments, $154,331.09. 

BRITISH CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 5 Park Sq., Boston. (Incorporated 

1817.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Vaughan Jealous, President; Thomas T. Stokes, Secretary; 
Frederick J. Stark, Treasurer. 

Temporary relief of those born under the British flag, their im- 
mediate descendants and families. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 421; families aided, 257. 



1 Present treasurer, Gwendolyn W. Conant. 



40 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $539 00 

Income from investments . . 646 10 

Total current receipts . . $1,185 10 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,132 11 



$2,317 21 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 
Burial account . . 



Total current 
Wheeler fund 
Permanent fund 
Cash on hand 



$252 00 

207 41 

862 34 

180 00 

5 00 

$1,506 75 

25 00 

25 00 

760 46 

$2,317 21 



Value of investments, $12,964.75. 



BROOKE HOUSE, 79 Chandler St., Boston. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Jacob C. Rogers, President; Miss Marianne Paine, Secre- 
tary; Walter Hunnewell, Treasurer; Miss Sarah E. Gardner, 
Superintendent. 

A home for working girls at moderate cost. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 157; outside institu- 
tion, 302, viz., 170 partly paying, 132 free; families aided, 15. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 


. $14,213 79 

1,383 00 

1,880 00 

53 65 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Laundry 
Water tax 
Insurance 

Interest on mortgage 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $6,108 39 

. 7,476 78 

1,641 85 

1,667 51 
247 39 
142 10 
552 93 
450 00 
165 08 


Total current receipts . 


. $17,530 44 

f 

2,310 56 


Cash on hand at beginning c 
year .... 


$18,452 03 
1,388 97 




$19,841 00 


$19,841 00 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,000; amount of mortgage on same, $10,000; value of invest- 
ments, $30,000. 



THE BUNKER HILL BOYS' CLUB ASSOCIATION, 10 Wood St., Charles- 
town. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

George Bramwell Baker, President; Frank S. Mason, Secretary 
and Acting Treasurer; Harris G. LeRoy, Director. 

To take Charlestown boys off the streets at night and give 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



41 



them manual and physical training. Ages, eight to sixteen, 
distinction as to race, creed or condition of life. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 1,156. 



No 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $141 08 

Subscriptions and donations . 7,664 85 

Income from investments . . 215 05 

Miscellaneous . . . . 110 00 

Total current receipts . . $8,130 98 

Bills contracted, not paid . . 496 96 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 755 06 



$9,383 00 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $4,029 76 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 1,474 56 

Games, etc. . . . . 192 82 
Classes, instruction and material 994 89 
Heat, light and power . . 378 03 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 125 69 
Entertainments and summer trips 807 45 

Previous bills 191 23 

Miscellaneous .... 671 14 

Total current expenses . . $8,865 57 

Cash on hand .... 517 43 

$9,383 00 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$8,000; value of investments, $4,000. 

BTJRNAP FREE HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 38 Pleasant St., Dorchester. 
(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for s^ear ending January 31, 1916. 

J. Converse Gray, President; Miss Mary A. Fitch, Secretary; 
George G. Quincy, Treasurer; Miss Ida G. Angell, Superintendent. 

Free home for women at least sixty-five years of age, Protes- 
tants and natives of Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6 to 7. 

Number aided during year, 20. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning 
year .... 



of 



$11,550 00 


3,295 


28 


1,000 


00 


3,302 


22 


819,147 50 


2,482 


32 







$21,629 82 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . 82,294 54 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 102 05 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,710 21 

Heat, light, power and telephone 582 54 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 450 65 

Undertaker and special medical 

services .... 105 65 

Total current expenses . . $5,245 64 

Investments .... 14,314 03 

Cash on hand .... 2,070 15 

$21,629 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, about $65,000. 



42 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BURRAGE HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, Bumpkin Island, Boston Harbor. 

(Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Albert C. Burrage, President; Alice H. Burrage, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Nellie M. Irving, Superintendent. 
To care for crippled children. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 40. 
Number aided during year, 170. 



Dr. 



Donations 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



Cr. 



120,350 00 


Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and offic 


. $5,218 33 






$20,350 00 


plies 


• . 508 51 




Provisions and supplies 


4,991 25 


5 76 


Heat, light and power 


876 90 




Furnishings- 


649 41 




Extraordinary repairs 


7,100 60 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


1,005 99 




. $20,350 99 




Cash on hand . 


4 77 


$20,355 76 


$20,355 76 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$200,000. 



CAPE COD ASSOCIATION, Room 22, Ames Building, Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1914.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Willard T. Sears, President; Charles F. Crowell, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Helping Cape Cod young men through college by means of 
loans. 

Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 

Income from investments 



$1,305 13 



Total current receipts . . $1,305 13 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,312 82 



$2,617 95 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup> 

plies .... 
Metal box for papers . 
Rent of safe deposit box 
To beneficiaries 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$5 00 

2 75 

10 00 

800 00 



$817 75 

58 05 

1,742 15 

$2,617 95 



Value of investments, $20,910. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



43 



CARNEY HOSPITAL, Old Harbor St., South Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Sister Raphael Jones, President and Treasurer; Sister M. Ber- 
nard Nunan, Secretary. 

Care of the sick, irrespective of creed, color or nationality 
(contagious diseases excepted). 

Number of paid employees, 206, including 107 pupil nurses. 

Total number of beds, 205. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 3,726; number 
of free patients, 1,044. 

Total number of hospital days during year, 50,391; number of 
free days, 6,435. 

Total number of visits in out-patient department during year, 
48,111. 



Dr. 
Patients' payments 
Payments by city, town or state 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Unrestricted legacies 

Total receipts 
Cash on band at beginning of 
year ..... 



$94,364 84 


534 


84 


10,220 


72 


722 


41 


2,803 


69 


$108,646 50 


877 


71 


«1flQ ZOA 


9.1 



Cr. 



Professional care of patients 


$11,078 22 


Department expenses (wages) . 


15,318 63 


General house and property ex- 




penses . 


76,410 97 


Interest and insurance 


3,823 29 


Miscellaneous 


1,592 86 


Total expenses 


$108,223 97 


Cash on hand 


1,300 24 




$109,524 21 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$265,200; amount of mortgage on same, $53,500; value of invest- 
ments, $5,493. 



CHANNING HOME, 198 Pilgrim Rd., Boston. (Incorporated 1858 and 1861.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Algernon Coolidge, M.D., Secretary; James P. Parmenter, 
Treasurer; Ellen C. MacAdam, Matron. 

The care of sick, destitute women, especially those in advanced 
stages of tuberculosis. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 89, viz., 25 partly paying, 64 free. 



44 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



Cr. 

$571 14 Salaries and wages . . . $4,252 53 
1,035 00 Printing, postage and office sup- 

2,950 00 plies 148 05 

6,220 81 Provisions and supplies . . 4,368 01 

Heat, light and power . . 1,124 18 

§10,776 95 Furnishings and incidental re- 

2,124 45 pairs 2,487 57 

Telephone .... 109 20 

Interest ..... 327 77 

Miscellaneous . . . . 84 09 

$12,901 40 $12,901 40 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$35,000; value of investments, $143,534.79. 



CHARITABLE BURIAL ASSOCIATION, 104 Salem St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1894.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Abraham Moss, President; James H. Stone, Secretary; Mark 
Lewis, Treasurer. 

To furnish free burial for the needy. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number buried, 37. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$479 7( 



Cr. 



$460 82 


Salaries and wages 


$75 00 


18 94 


Printing, postage and office sup- 






plies ..... 


3 45 




Sewer tax ..... 


5 09 




Fixing graves 


25 00 




Collection fees .... 


17 73 




Hearses . . 


76 00 




Undertakers .... 
Total current expenses 


232 83 




$435 10 




Cash on hand .... 


44 66 



$479 76 



CHARITABLE IRISH SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1809.) 

Report for year ending March 17, 1916. 

Patrick H. Crowley, President; John J. Keenan, P. O. Box 45, 
Back Bay Station, Boston, Secretary; Thomas F. Taff, 1 Treasurer. 

To cultivate a spirit of unity and harmony among all resident 
Irishmen and their descendants; to alleviate suffering and to aid 
such of its members as may be deserving of its charity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 36; number of families aided, 4. 



Died January, 1916. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



45 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,338 64 

Interest 450 93 

Total current receipts . . $2,789 57 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 12,504 96 



$15,294 53 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . . $1,104 96 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 598 52 

Rent . . . . . 278 82 

Relief, passage tickets, etc. . 320 20 

Miscellaneous .... 1,282 75 

Total current expenses . . $3,585 25 

Cash on hand . . .'" .' 11,709 28 

$15,294 53 



CHARITABLE SURGICAL APPLIANCE SHOP, Children's Hospital Build- 
ing, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

R. W. Emmons, 2d, President and Treasurer; Augustus Thorn- 
dike, Secretary; Theodore H. Bartol, Superintendent. 

To supply hospitals, doctors and others with surgical appli- 
ances at cost. 

Number of paid employees, 8. 



Dr. 

Income from investments 
From sale of apparatus 



$706 67 
12,414 92 



Total current receipts . . $13,121 59 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 2,004 67 



$15,126 26 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Materials 

Tools and machinery- 
Donation 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$7,178 34 

3,792 62 

56 76 

200 00 

549 66 

$11,777 38 
1,480 00 
1,868 88 

$15,126 26 



Value of investments, $13,772.50. 



CHARLESTOWN POOR'S FUND, TRUSTEES OF, 233 Main St., Charles- 
town. (Incorporated 1825.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

B. F. Hatch, President; Gardner Bates, Secretary and Treasurer. 
To provide coal and medicine for the poor. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided, 188. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$1,430 38 


Salaries and wages 


$150 00 


735 37 


Printing, postage and 


office sup- 




plies 


9 50 




Coal 


. 1,463 87 




Medicine . 


22 31 




Treasurer's bond 


37 50 




Safe deposit box 


12 00 




Miscellaneous . 
Total current expen 


4 00 




ses . . $1,699 18 




Cash on hand . 


466 57 


$2,165 75 


$2,165 75 



Value of investments, $36,931.77. 



46 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL, 300 Longwood Ave., Boston. (Incorpo- 
rated 1869.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Francis W. Hunnewell, President; George von L. Meyer, Jr., 
Secretary; Gordon Abbott, Treasurer; Sister Caroline, Superin- 
tendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of children under twelve years 
of age, residents of Boston, and, in special cases, non-residents. 
Training school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 130. 

Number of beds, 150. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 3,161, viz., 1,609 
paying, 604 partly paying, 948 free; outside institution, 42,231, 
viz., 28,154 partly paying, 14,077 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come . 
Income from investments 
Surgical appliances 
Miscellaneous 



$30,435 71 
95,697 00 

4,050 00 
35,173 17 
10,671 83 

1,302 56 



$177,330 27 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies . 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings, incidental repairs 

and insurance 
Drugs and medicines 
Surgical appliances 
Annuities 
Interest 
Taxes, gift, annual report 

water, X-ray, telephone 

school of nursing, laundry 

and pathology 
Hospital petty cash, social serv 

ice and miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$48,946 76 

2,241 62 

35,734 21 

30 00 

16,801 66 

4,439 37 

4,253 85 

7,957 75 

1,000 00 

2,818 12 



18,753 08 
3,542 84 



$146,519 26 
30,811 01 



$177,330 27 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$838,380.11; value of investments, $917,949.66. 



THE CHILDREN'S MISSION TO CHILDREN, 279 Tremont St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1864.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Henry M. Williams, President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, 
Clerk; Alls ton Burr, Treasurer; Parker B. Field, General Secretary. 

To study and correct adverse conditions surrounding children; 
to befriend children of Boston and vicinity in any form of need, 
of either sex and of any race or creed; to advise and guide them 
in their homes; to secure adequate assistance along special lines; 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 47 

to place such as must be removed from their homes in carefully 
selected private families and to constantly supervise them; to 
encourage parents to pay what they are able; to educate and in- 
terest well-to-do children in benevolence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 350; society re- 
imbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision, in full, 64; 
in part, 124; not reimbursed, 162. Monthly average number of 
children under supervision in foster homes, 200. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 6. 

Number of separate children aided through advice and super- 
vision but not taken into custody, 698. Total number helped, 
1,048. 

Dr. Cr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $12,352 20 Salaries $15,354 69 

Subscriptions and donations . 7,473 11 Printing, advertising, office ex- 
Annuities and bequests to income 3,136 00 penses and supplies . . 2,383 54 

Income from investments . . 21,704 51 Board 20,015 51 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 382 36 

Clothing . . . . .5,125 26 

Medical 1,130 63 

Traveling expenses . . . 1,279 95 
National Conference of Chari- 
ties and Correction . . 212 40 

Audit 30 00 

Preventive work . . . 300 00 

Tuition 66 00 

Education in benevolence . . 646 10 



Total current receipts . . $44,665 82 
Deficit 2,260 62 



$46,926 44 



$46,926 44 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$145,400; value of investments, $471,357.04. 

CHURCH HOME FOR ORPHAN AND DESTITUTE CHILDREN, 296 Boyl- 
ston St., Boston. (Incorporated 1858.) 

Report for year ending October 15, 1916. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., President; Rev. Reginald H. 
Howe, D.D., Secretary; Mr. Charles E. Mason, Treasurer; Miss 
Katharine P. Hewins, General Secretary. 

Provides care for children of Protestant Episcopal parentage in 
foster homes of the same faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 259; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision, in full, 
23; partly paying, 101; free, 75. Monthly average number of 
children under supervision in foster homes, including those 
supervised after returned to their families, 173. Number of plac- 
ing out visitors, 6. 



48 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Reimbursement from relatives 

etc. .... 
Received for industrial education 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 

Deficit 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . 



Cr. 



$11,124 63 
11,700 62 

3,269 68 
669 79 
319 69 


Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and offi 

penses 
Rent 

Children's expenses . 
Office equipment 
Telephone 
Miscellaneous . 


. $9,332 93 
ce ex- 

843 93 
900 00 
. 16,513 45 
217 44 
493 98 
1,160 50 


$27,084 41 
849 52 

1,528 30 


$29,462 23 


$29,462 23 



Value of real estate owned, 
$256,850.72. 



,000; value of investments, 



CITY MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1820.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Arthur S. Johnson, President; Rev. Daniel W. Waldron, Secre- 
tary; Samuel F. Wilkins, Treasurer. 

Religious and benevolent work among the poor of Boston. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 26. 
Number of families aided, 1,867. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Bequest ..... 
Securities sold .... 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



Cr. 



$34,620 08 


Salaries and wages . 


$17,250 00 


7,375 00 


Printing, postage, collection ex- 




5,126 00 


penses and office supplies 


1,098 35 




Rent .... 


514 22 




$47,121 08 


Literature distributed 


119 59 


4,995 49 


Work for Chinese 


451 71 


7,870 00 


Interest .... 


344 48 


1,750 00 


Relief of poor . 


8,089 44 




Recreation work 


10,760 98 


37 88 


Thanksgiving and Christmas 






charities 


7,883 15 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


763 72 




$47,275 64 




Investments 


6,329 38 




Paid loan 


2,205 34 




Cash on hand . 


5,964 09 


$61,774 45 


$61,774 45 



Value of investments, $109,774. 



COLUMBUS DAY NURSERY OF SOUTH BOSTON, 376 Fourth St., South 
Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

David W. Creed, President; John M. Costello, Secretary; Peter 
W. Walsh, Treasurer. 

Day care of the children of needy working women. 

Number of paid employees, 6. 

Number of days' care, 12,506, viz., 7,368 paying, 2,827 partly 
paying, 2,311 free. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



49 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $93 60 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,193 05 

From children (5 cents per day) . 509 75 

Total current receipts . . $1,796 40 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 156 07 



$1,952 47 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $621 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 11 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 273 69 

Taxes 12 60 

Heat, light and power . . 122 58 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 539 52 

Interest 25 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 81 76 

Total current expense . . $1,687 15 

Cash on hand 265 32 

$1,952 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$6,500; amount of mortgage on same, $1,000. 

CONFERENCE OP BAPTIST MINISTERS IN MASSACHUSETTS, 525 
Tremont Temple, Boston. (Incorporated 1862.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Rev. W. C. McAllister, President; Rev. Henry E. Hodge, Secre- 
tary; Rev. Joseph E. Perry, Treasurer. 

The promotion of the union and usefulness of its members, and 
the relief of aged and disabled Baptist ministers who are indigent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 52. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year (for current fund account) 



$1,175 96 

12,417 61 

73 87 


$13,667 44 
1,876 40 


$15,543 84 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $350 00 
Printing, postage, office supplies 

and entire current expense . 474 53 

Insurance and transfer of estate 20 75 

Interest 936 42 

To brethren .... 13,222 50 

Miscellaneous . ... . . . 351 22 

Total current expenses . . $15,355 42 

Invested . . . . 15 75 

Cash on hand .... 172 67 

$15,543 84 



Value of investments, $287,864.70. 



CONSUMPTIVES' HOME, TRUSTEES OF THE, 560 Blue Hill Ave., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Hon. John L. Bates, President; Mrs. Marie C. Mallory, Secre- 
tary; Edward D. Mallory, Treasurer and Superintendent; Mrs. C. 
M. Torrey, Matron. 

A Protestant home for the care of needy consumptives in the 
last stages of the disease. No admission fees. Boston patients 
preferred. Open to all without regard to age, sex, color, nation- 
ality or creed. 



50 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 19. 
Number aided during year, 58, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Ladies' auxiliary- 
Insurance rebate 

Total current receipts . 
Loans ..... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$2,578 69 


6,734 


42 


1,026 00 


713 


28 


129 


27 


$11,181 


66 


23,837 


12 


32 


20 







Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Insurance 

Heat and light 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Blacksmith, hay and grain 

Water, telephone and advertising 

Safety vault 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Loans and interest . 
Cash on hand . 



$7,768 75 

37 29 

9,680 51 
1,557 58 
2,916 37 



827 11 
113 49 
363 16 
10 00 
139 15 



$35,050 98 



$23,413 41 
9,886 50 
1,751 07 

$35,050 98 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$133,427.50; value of investments, $21,351.53. 



CO-OPERATIVE WORKROOMS, INC., 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1877.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Hon. George A. P. H. Duncan, President; Mrs. Neal Rantoul, 
Secretary; Orrin G. Wood, Treasurer; Miss Sarah R. Berry, Agent. 
To aid poor women by giving out and teaching sewing. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 334. 



Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From sales .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$5,575 50 

215 06 

7,208 99 


$12,999 55 
1,500 00 

161 30 


«14.fifin 85 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Heat, light and power 
Materials bought 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$7,529 47 

190 98 

5,781 99 

$13,502 44 
1,158 41 



$14,660 85 



Value of investments, $3,898.75. 



DAHLGREN MEMORIAL HALL ASSOCIATION, 409 Broadway, South 
Boston. (Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

J. Payson Bradley, President; F. Z. Jenks, Secretary; Frank 
Wilkinson, Treasurer. 

To assist indigent and destitute soldiers and sailors of the war 
of the rebellion and their widows and orphan children. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



51 



Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 73. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $1,297 93 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 3,747 91 



$5,045 84 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Rent ..... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 

Relief fund .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$98 00 

25 30 

300 00 

35 55 

34 47 
200 00 

$693 32 
4,352 52 

$5,045 84 



Value of investments, $8,900. 



DALY INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 111 Train St., Dorchester. (Incorporated 

1899.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Rev. James 
O'Brien, Secretary; Rt. Rev. Mgr. J. P. E. O'Connell, Treasurer; 
Sister M. Sebastian, Superintendent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year, 94, viz., 42 partly paying, 52 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$2,536 00 


3,221 


86 


1,485 


81 


2,897 


23 


$10,140 


90 


4,226 


52 







Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Insurance 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$14,367 42 



$1,715 00 

101 33 

5,205 29 
1,383 67 

2,113 43 
234 90 

$10,753 62 
3,613 80 

$14,367 42 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$78,000; value of investments, $28,300. 



DEACONESS' AID SOCIETY OF NEW ENGLAND, 36 Bromfleld St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending January 4, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary L. W. Foss, President; Mrs. Nellie Lacount Rich, 
Secretary; Mrs. Sarah Frances Law, Treasurer. 



52 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 

To aid in the training of evangelistic workers and render assist- 
ance to the New England Deaconess Association. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Annuities and bequests to income 

Income from investments 

Mite boxes 

Membership dues 

Life members 

Serena C. Webster fund 

Rainbow fair 

Miscellaneous . 



S101 35 

308 06 
18 58 

309 15 
250 75 

25 00 

250 00 

1,441 40 

8 28 



Total current receipts . . §2,712 57 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 473 77 



S3, 186 34 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. S607 50 


Printing, postage and office sup- 


plies .... 


67 08 


Provisions and supplies 


40 48 


Rent .... 


23 50 


Heat, light and power 


7 12 


Guests in hospital 


223 00 


Training school 


250 00 


Scholarship 


120 00 


Miscellaneous . 


39 22 


Total current expenses 


. $1,377 90 


Cash on hand 


. 1,808 44 



§3,186 34 



DENISON HOUSE, 89-97 Tyler St., Boston. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending October 15, 1916. 

Bertha Scripture, President; Mary H. Dana, Secretary; D. 
Blakely Hoar, Treasurer; Geraldine Gordon, Head Worker. 

College and educational work through clubs and classes, and 
neighborhood co-operation for better conditions. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14, 



Dr. 
Donations for general expenses 
College Settlement Association . 
Special donations for summer 

work, boys' work, Italian fund, 

Christmas, etc. 
Legacy ..... 
House and club dues 
Sale of books, stamps, etc. 
Telephone tolls 

Interest ..... 
Italian Fund, renting costumes . 
Fete at Waltham (net) 
Housekeeper board . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



825,876 21 



Cr. 



85,396 34 


Salaries and -wages . 


87,315 50 


1,200 00 


Printing, postage and office sup 






plies . . 


1,281 90 




House expenses 


4,036 97 


12,429 24 


Light and fuel . 


778 64 


500 00 


Furnishings and incidental re 




46 02 


pairs .... 


769 19 


37 74 


Water tax 


87 66 


45 09 


Payment on mortgage note 


1,450 00 


42 85 


Mortgage interest 


600 61 


5 00 


Telephone 


223 87 


1,473 03 


Christmas 


160 24 


4,374 50 


Summer work . 


762 51 




Recreation 

Italian department . 


117 50 

1,009 09 


825,549 81 




Class work 


80 49 


326 40 


Neighborhood hygiene depart 






ment .... 


310 13 




Relief .... 


62 36 




Insurance 


45 31 




Canteba Fund payments . 


49 50 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


89 21 




819,230 68 




Payment of loan to gymnasiun 


i 




fund . 


3,855 54 




Cash on hand . 


2,789 99 



S25,876 21 



Value of investments, $15,783.50. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



53 



DEVENS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Universalist Church, Church Ct., 
Charlestown. (Incorporated 1856.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary J. Day, President; Mrs. Elizabeth G. Hooper, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Elizabeth H. Brown, Treasurer. 

The promotion of charitable and benevolent objects in Charles- 
town. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided, about 10. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$23 00 
155 40 



$178 40 
19 03 



$197 43 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$36 00 
159 74 

$195 74 
1 69 

$197 43 



Value of investments, $4,547.70. 



DISPENSARY FOR WOMEN, 633 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 10, 1916. 

George W. Kaan, M.D., President; W. Herbert Grant, M.D., 
Secretary; Charles B. Darling, M.D., Treasurer. 

The treatment of poor women suffering from disease, and par- 
ticularly those diseases which are peculiar to their sex. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number of patients during year, about 4,500. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,988 84 

Subscriptions and donations . 400 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 31 49 

Total current receipts . . $2,420 33 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 370 33 



$2,790 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Heat, light and power 
Laundry . 
Drugs 
Loan 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . 



$667 25 

59 27 
100 51 
500 04 

66 82 

59 85 
615 91 
270 00 

29 08 

$2,368 73 
421 93 

$2,790 66 



54 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



DORCHESTER HOUSE, 7 Gordon PL, Dorchester. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Miss Caroline S. Callender, President; Austin A. Ballou, Secre- 
tary; Everett H. Sharp, Treasurer; Miss Alice Moore, Resident in 
Charge. 

Industrial, educational and charitable work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 400. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,899 29 

Miscellaneous . 66 

Total current receipts . . $2,899 95 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 110 80 



$3,010 75 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Rent 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 



Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,400 00 

98 05 
490 00 
215 62 



107 89 
394 86 
297 92 

. $3,004 34 
6 41 

$3,010 75 



DORCHESTER RELIEF SOCIETY, 204 Adams St., Dorchester. (Incorpo- 
rated 1904.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Edwin T. . Home, President; Mrs. S. F. K. Nash, Secretary; 
Everett H. Sharp, Treasurer; Miss H. Eugenia Bruce, Agent. 

Care of worthy aged poor; aid to persons recommended by the 
Associated Charities; free dispensary for needy persons only; sup- 
port of nurse of Instructive District Nursing Association. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of families aided, 143. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,640 71 

Annuities and bequests to income 200 00 

Income from permanent funds . 450 00 

Collected by agent . . . 581 45 

Flower day ... 553 22 

Total current receipts . . $3,425 38 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 18 53 



$3,443 91 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Rent . 

Instructive District Nursing As- 
sociation . 

Dispensary . 

Aid 

Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$600 00 

242 26 
220 00 

429 55 

155 63 

1,724 51 

16 00 



$3,387 95 
55 96 



$3,443 91 



Value of investments, $11,104.37. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



55 



EASTERN MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION, 111 Webster St., East Boston. 

(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Rev. J. A. Johnson, President; Charles R. Rosenquist, Secre- 
tary; Andrew Nelson, Treasurer; Rev. Oscar Lindergren, Superin- 
tendent. 

Missionary work; conducts the Scandinavian Sailors' and Im- 
migrants' Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 1,452, viz., 1,084 
paying, 272 partly paying, 96 free; outside institution, 34, all 
free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income through Home 
Loan ..... 

Miscellaneous . . . . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,233 78 

7,022 43 

80 00 

23 40 

$9,359 61 
362 59 



$9,722 20 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Paid loans 

Interest and water tax 
Insurance .' 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,204 00 

57 40 

5,359 91 

614 46 

414 70 
280 00 
393 45 
129 60 

162 72 

$9,616 24 
105 96 

$9,722 20 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,000; amount of mortgage on same, $5,600. 



ELIZABETH PEABODY HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 357 Charles St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Dr. Richard G. Wadsworth, President; Miss Alice A. Burditt, 
Secretary; Edward J. Holmes, Treasurer; Mrs. Eva W. White, 
Head President. 

Educational and social work in the immediate neighborhood, 
without regard to age, sex, color, nationality or creed. Modified 
milk station. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 900, viz., 400 partly paying, 500 
free; number of families aided, 300. 



56 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$739 28 


Salaries and wages . 


. $8,862 80 


Subscriptions and donations 


. 14,588 26 


Printing, postage and office sup 




Income from investments . 


138 45 


plies .... 


289 61 


Fairs and entertainments . 


3,362 51 


Provisions and supplies 


3,089 56 


Residents' board 


5,481 64 


Heat, light and power 


1,949 41 


Miscellaneous ... 


34 22 


Furnishings and incidental re 








pairs .... 


1,761 52 






Total current receipts . 


. $24,344 36 


Washing and cleaning 


384 12 


Cash on hand at beginning 


of 


Telephone 


126 11 


year .... 


1,063 95 


Settlement work 


2,005 84 






Stenography 


261 85 






Insurance 


121 07 






Relief of unemployment 


152 42 






Interest .... 


2,410 41 






Taxes ...•-.,.. 


190 70 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


253 71 




$21,859 13 






Cash on hand . 


3,549 18 




$25,408 31 


$25,408 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$111,400; amount of mortgage on same, $73,875.80; value of in- 
vestments, $25,863.30. 



ELLEN M. GIFFORD SHELTERING HOME CORPORATION, 20 Appleton 
Rd., Brighton. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1916. 

Josephine MacC. Shaw, President; Herbert B. Gushing, Treas- 
urer; Albert H. Perkins, Superintendent. 
Care of deserted animals. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 1,072 (animals). 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$4 00 


Salaries and wages 


. $1,517 00 


6,941 97 


Printing, postage and office sup 






plies .... 


3 54 




$6,945 97 


Provisions and supplies 


. 1,278 44 


1,335' 80 


Rent .... 


180 00 




Heat, light and power 


62 48 




Furnishings and incidental re 






pairs .... 


109 50 




Telephone 


36 00 




Water .... 


27 00 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


173 93 




$3,387 89 




Income invested 


4,221 12 




Cash on hand . 


672 76 


$8,281 77 


$8,281 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$24,100; value of investments, $158,717.99. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



57 



ELLIS MEMORIAL AND ELDREDGE HOUSE, INC. , 12 Carver St. and 34 
Church St., Boston. (Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Lucy W. Sullivan, President; Miss Emily L. Storer, Secre- 
tary; George U. Crocker, Treasurer; Miss Jane R. McCrady, 
Head Worker. 

To draw together the best forces in the neighborhood; to fur- 
nish and promote healthy recreation; to study conditions in the 
interests of the neighborhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 



Dr. 

From subscriptions, donations 

and entertainments . . $8,039 07 



Total current receipts . . $8,039 07 
Borrowed of Old Colony Trust 

Company .... 1,000 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 639 22 



$9,678 29 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $3,507 27 
Printing, stationery and office sup- 
plies 116 98 

Rent 223 92 

Heat, light and power . . 358 71 

Telephone . . . . 189 25 

General house expenses . . 1,196 40 

Summer camps and sand garden 2,923 56 

Repairs and improvements . 720 89 

Miscellaneous . . . 228 09 

Total current expenses . . $9,465 07 

Cash on hand . . . . 213 22 

$9,678 29 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$27,500; amount of mortgage on same, $4,200; value of invest- 
ments, $7,000. 



EPISCOPAL CITY MISSION, 1 Joy St., Boston. (Incorporated 1843.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, D.D., President; Charles E. Mason, 
Secretary; George S. Selfridge, Treasurer; Rev. Ernest J. Dennen, 
Superintendent. 

To search out the religious needs of the city of Boston, and to 
conduct the missionary work within its limits. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 75, including summer 
workers. 



58 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$375 36 


Subscriptions and donations 


38,539 92 


Income from investments . 


4,801 63 


For boatswain's locker, from 




capital . 


90 47 


Total current receipts . 


$43,807 38 


For diocesan missions 


8,833 63 


For diocesan mission fund 


3,670 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




year 


582 11 


Annuities and bequests to income 


11,050 00 


Debit balance, general account . 


324 55 


Debit balance, special funds. 


11,580 74 



$79,848 41 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$28,987 61 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


1,981 43 


Provisions and supplies 


1,651 12 


Rent ..... 


451 00 


Heat, light and power 


1,708 76 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


1,630 58 


Debit balance, special funds 


9,968 50 


Relief, Christmas, etc. 


1,035 07 


Interest ..... 


1,658 54 


Water rates and telephone 


503 81 


Insurance and taxes 


1,609 27 


Playrooms, excursions, camps, 




etc. besides stipends and food 


862 79 


Miscellaneous .... 


1,562 92 


Total current expenses (in- 




cluding debit balance) . 


$53,611 40 


Improvements to real estate 


713 31 


For St. Ansgarius Church, auto- 




mobile and garage 


1,034 25 


To Sailors' Haven, Hemenway 




gift ... 


500 00 


To Sailors' Haven, Sailors' Haven 




fund . . . . . . 


592 68 


To Sailors' Haven, boatswain's 




locker ..... 


145 64 


To treasurer, Diocesan Board of 




Missions .... 


8,833 63 


For diocesan mission fund 


3,813 66 


Income carried to capital . 


10,603 84 




$79,848 41 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$240,014.25 (unoccupied, $6,800); amount of mortgage on same, 
$25,650; value of investments, $103,831. 



EVANGELISTIC ASSOCIATION OP NEW ENGLAND, 519 Tremont Temple, 
Boston. (Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Allan C. Emery, President; Arthur Reddish, Recording Secre- 
tary; S. M. Sayford, Treasurer and General Secretary. 

To assist in evangelistic work throughout New England; to 
maintain a bureau for supplying ministers for vacant pulpits; to 
minister to the comfort of patients in the hospitals of Boston and 
vicinity. Little material aid is given, but other assistance is 
rendered to many hospital patients. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 25. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



59 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests to income . 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$10,035 10 

2,375 00 

102 83 

278 97 

$12,791 90 

2,458 39 



$15,250 29 



Gr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $3,195 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 517 44 

Rent . . . . . 600 00 

Light 10 05 

Hospital visitation . . . 2,825 92 

Evangelistic work in small towns 3,699 40 

Miscellaneous . . . . 314 83 

Total current expenses . . $11,162 64 

Cash on hand .... 4,087 65 

$15,250 29 



FAITH AND HOPE ASSOCIATION, 192 Dartmouth St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1896.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Mrs. M. Clara Kirby, President; Harold V. Archambault, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer. 

Taking music and helpful literature to hospitals, old ladies' 
homes, etc.; taking Christmas gifts and necessary comforts to 
sick and needy women and children. Summer camp for tired 
women and girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year: in camp, 138, viz., 41 paying, 85 
partly paying, 12 free; outside camp, 200; number of families 
aided, 10. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . ' . 

Subscriptions and donations 
Mortgage payable 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$296 25 

2,302 09 

700 00 

$3,298 34 
9 00 



$3,307 34 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Camp property . 

Interest and insurance 

Property additions 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$334 82 

105 05 

1,183 20 

59 00 

406 30 

775 00 
65 50 

268 60 
76 06 

$3,273 53 
33 81 

$3,307 34 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1,600; mortgage on same, $700. 



THE FARM AND TRADES SCHOOL, Thompson's Island, Boston. (In- 
corporated 1835.) 

Report for year ending January 15, 1916. 

Alfred Bowditch, President; Tucker Daland, Secretary; Arthur 
Adams, Treasurer; Charles H. Bradley, Superintendent. 

The training and education of worthy boys of fair physical and 



60 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



mental condition, between the ages of ten and sixteen years, for 
higher schools and useful occupations. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 126, viz., 93 partly 
paying, 33 free; outside institution, 5 partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



$6,814 51 
5,630 00 

18,176 96 
1,384 34 

$32,005 81 
5,365 68 



$37,371 49 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Clothing - . 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Medical . 

Library .... 

Farm .... 

Educational and industrial 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Loans to graduates . 



$14,272 35 

1,160 20 
5,442 83 
1,332 47 
3,832 65 

3,841 70 
537 79 
113 83 
2,750 49 
1,992 78 
1,759 40 

$37,036 49 
335 00 

$37,371 49 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$43,075; value of investments, $326,278.14. 



THE FAULKNER HOSPITAL CORPORATION, Centre St., Jamaica Plain. 

(Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Nelson Curtis, President; Miss Emily G. Denny, Secretary; In- 
gersoll Bowditch, Treasurer; Miss Edith I. Cox, Superintendent. 

General hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 45 (including 25 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 36; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 570; number of free patients, 146; total number of 
hospital days during year, 9,886; number of free days, 2,973. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$25,169 36 
21,351 24 

$46,520 60 

12,176 76 



$58,697 36 



Cr. 



Administration 


. $3,527 98 


Professional care of patients 


5,088 32 


Department expenses 


24,418 12 


General house and property ex 




penses 


4,557 11 


Corporation expenses 


200 00 


Miscellaneous . 


863 94 


Total hospital expenses . 


$38,655 47 


Real estate expenses 


632 26 


Total expenses 


$39,287 73 


Income invested 


19,027 47 


Cash on hand . 


3S2 16 



$58,697 36 



Part II.1 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



61 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$147,500; value of investments, $430,456.61. 



FEDERATED JEWISH CHARITIES OP BOSTON, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Hon. Abraham C. Ratshesky, President; Abraham E. Pinanski, 
Secretary; Simon E. Hecht, Treasurer; Mrs. Martha M. Silver- 
man^ Superintendent. 

To maintain a central office for the eight affiliated societies, viz., 
United Hebrew Benevolent Association, Home for Jewish Chil- 
dren, Hebrew Women's Sewing Society, Hebrew Industrial School, 
Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society, Mount Sinai Hospital, Chari- 
table Burial Association, Boston Branch Baron de Hirsch Fund, 
and to solicit funds for support of same. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $67,534 61 

Annuities and bequests to income 6,917 99 

Income from investments . . 806 26 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



$75,258 86 



8,493 



$83,752 54 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $10,394 56 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 2,201 56 

Nine constituent societies . 57,000 00 



Total current expenses . 
Investments 
Cash on hand . 



$69,596 12 
8,555 83 
5,600 59 

$83,752 54 



Value of investments, $21,000. 



FLORENCE CRITTENTON LEAGUE OF COMPASSION, INCORPORATED, 

executive office, 506 Tremont Temple, Boston; Maternity Home, 701 
Massachusetts Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. A. Z. Conrad, D.D., President; Mrs. John Knox Mar- 
shall, Secretary; Edward E. Stevens, Treasurer; Mrs. C. M. Ellin- 
wood, Matron; Clarence R. Preston, General Secretary. 

For the purpose of reclaiming fallen girls and women, and pro- 
viding hospital care and a home for them and their infants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 130, viz., 39 paying, 
31 partly paying, 60 free; also 93 babies; outside institution, 300. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



T. D. 17 



Dr. 
Fr;n bene£:iar:es 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 

In;cne :r;n investnents . 
Sales and concerts 
~::e estates ana strlrak_ers 
Misce„anec-as .... 

Total current receipts . 
Enactment ^aaaa 
r.fa :a nana a: :t;:ii:i: :: 



: 



-SI. 746 19 


Salaries and wages . 


?> 34S S4 


14.649 11 


?r:n::na. a:s:are and :rn;e sup- 


: boo oo 


plies .... 


367 36 


578 5 


Provisions and supplies 


3.S09 81 


2.005 33 


Rent .... 


269 S4 


6S6" 00 


Heat, light and power 


L342 :> 


t8C :: 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


1 :35 14 




>.: --: =s 


Medicines 


::■: 32 


5.450 00 


Telephones 


230 09 




Advertising and solicitina 


561 63 


1 985 65 


Whs escapes and sprinklers 


•:>•: S5 




. iisceiianec-as . 
Total current expenses . 


575 S3 




S1S.454 39 




In: one invested 


LI 588 54 




Cash en hand . 


2.044 15 


$32,187 08 


133 187 08 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$18,000; value of investments, -824.015.94. 



FORSYTH DENTAL INFIRMARY FOR CHILDREN, Fenway and Hemen- 
way St., Boston. Incorporated 1910. 

Report for eleven months ending April 1. 1916. 

Thomas A. Forsyth, President; Chester B. Humphrey, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer; Dr. Harold deW. Cross. Director. 

Infirmary for the reception and oral treatment (dental, medical 
and surgical) of children under the age of sixteen years, and of 
such others as the corporation may from time to time determine 
upon. 

Number of paid officers or employees. 54. 

Number aided during above period, 15,771, viz., 15,755 partly 
paying, 16 free. 

o. 



Fees 


H 128 33 


Salaries and wages . 


;:■: 949 73 


Zn::ne iron investments 


; 17D 70 


Printing a cstaae and cauce rat" 




From Old Colony Trust Ccn- 




plies .... 


3.6-50 31 


:aiv, trust e-e 


: a 946 69 


Provisions and supplies . 


18,991 71 


Orthodontia tuition 


87a M 


Eeac dan: and a :~ er 


2.394 36 


I lis celiane cus 


1 .41 69 


Furnishinffs and incidental re- 








pairs .... 


\ 4'.:- '2 






Total current receipts . 


W5 162 41 


Insurance 


341 50 


Sale :: securities 


45,000 00 


Lectures and incidental ex- 




Tr a n=: erred from principal 


::.-!•:: :: 


penses 


1,421 -• 


lasn :n ~ -~ d ac "--£-- g ;; 


1,197 06 


^Miscellaneous 


2.340 43 


year ..... 










Total current expenses 


S95.504 03 






Transferred to principal . 


26,608 12 






Ca;n :n nana 


3 747 32 




5::: 858 -.: 


ill! 559 47 



Value of real estate in trust occupied for corporate purpose; 
1850,000; value of investments, $2,001,357.50. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



63 



THE FRAGMENT SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1816.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

. Mrs. F. A. Turner, President; Mrs. R. J. Monks, Secretary; 
Miss Annie A. Hough, 29 Cedar St., Roxbury, Treasurer. 

To supply clothing to needy women and children. 

Number aided during year, about 1,500. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $176 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,000 00 

Income from investments . . 989 13 

Total current receipts . . S3, 165 13 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4,328 55 



$7,493 68 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Boots and shoes 
Clothing and materials 
European sufferers 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



S18 40 
1,174 00 
1,244 74 

125 00 
16 00 



$2,578 


14 


1,947 


17 


2,968 


37 



$7,493 68 



Value of investments, $23,656.90. 



FRANCES E. WILLARD SETTLEMENT, 38-46 Chambers St., Boston, and 
Old Billerica Rd., Bedford. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Caroline M. Caswell, President and General Manager; Nellie F. 
Hill, Secretary; Mrs. Elmer A. Stevens, Treasurer. 

Home for young working women or women earning low sala- 
ries, those training for self-support who need temporary aid, or 
strangers who need assistance. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 29. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 769, viz., 715 paying, 
48 partly paying, 6 free; outside institution, 1,882, viz., 1,382 
partly paying, 500 free; number of families aided, 500. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Entertainments and sales . 
Farm .... 
Industrial 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . 



$10,348 


69 


12,832 32 


7,748 


29 


1,933 


00 


6,798 


18 


968 


97 


1,617 


97 


$42,247 


42 


500 00 


149 20 


449 »Q£ 


AO 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$11,074 57 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


1,082 08 


Provisions, supplies and laundry 


6,753 83 


Insurance and interest 


4,072 78 


Heat, light and power 


2,101 87 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


1,503 65 


Improvements 


3,448 09 


Farm ..... 


2,259 01 


Clubs 


1,030 31 


Industrial .... 


1,130 79 


Miscellaneous .... 


104 29 



Total current expenses 
Loans paid 
Cash on hand . 



$34,561 27 

7,950 00 

385 35 

$42,896 62 



64 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1 17,333; amount of mortgage on same, $51,500; value of invest- 
ments, $18,988.75. 



THE FRANKLIN SQUARE HOUSE, 11 East Newton St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1901.) 

Report for year ending February 29, 1916. 

Rev. George L. Perin, President; J. Porter Russell, Secretary; 
Fred M. Lamson, Treasurer; Miss Castine C. Swanson, Superin- 
tendent. 

To provide a home for working girls at moderate cost. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 167. 

Number aided during year, 1,067, viz., 751 paying, 290 partly 
paying, 26 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $173,476 54 

Subscriptions and donations . 4,238 29 

Income from investments . 1,417 29 

Organ receipts . . . 310 22 

Entertainments . . . 244 48 

Miscellaneous . . . 430 40 

Total current receipts . . $180,117 22 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 18,843 17 



$198,960 39 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $59,435 71 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 2,225 57 

Provisions and supplies . . 68,407 97 

General repairs . . . 8,303 75 

Heat, light and power . . 12,480 99 

Furnishings .... 4,378 08 

Laundry expense . . . 1,945 75 

Hospital expense . . . 638 85 

Advertising .... 1,204 33 

Legal and auditing expense . 477 00 

Insurance .... 1,360 50 

Interest . . . . 10,961 66 

Uncollectible accounts . . 1,467 28 

Miscellaneous . . . 1,858 34 

Total current expenses . $175,145 78 

Cash on hand . . . 23,814 61 

$198,960 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$510,022.80; amount of mortgage on same, $225,000; value of in- 
vestments, $22,893.99. 



FRAUEN VEREIN, 17 Everett Ave., Dorchester. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Henrietta Benjamin, President; Mrs. Jetty Robinson, 
Secretary; Mrs. Julia Stone, Treasurer; Mrs. Annie Schlager, Su- 
perintendent. 

Maintaining a convalescent home for women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 80. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



65 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $412 80 

Fair 1,288 22 

Strawberry festival . . . 69 56 

Miscellaneous .... 838 53 

Total current receipts . . $2,609 11 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 3,076 90 



$5,686 01 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Water tax 
Interest on mortgage . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$470 00 

115 00 

478 53 
30 00 

160 00 

450 00 
25 00 

220 00 

$1,948 53 
3,737 48 

$5,686 01 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
>,500; amount of mortgage on same, $4,400. 



THE FREDERICK E. WEBER CHARITIES CORPORATION, 53 State St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending July 18, 1916. 

Arthur L. Howard, President; Howard P. Wise, Clerk; George 
M. Amerige, Treasurer. 

Aids educational or charitable institutions, and relieves indi- 
vidual need regardless of nationality or color. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: 85 individuals, 10 corporations. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries (loans repaid 

and interest) . . . $186 20 

Income from investments . . 20,126 64 

Refunds . . . ■ . . 130 45 

Miscellaneous . . . . 57 60 

Total current receipts . . $20,500 89 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year % 9 86 



$20,510 75 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$2,200 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


7 01 


Rent 


300 00 


Delegate to National Conference 


60 16 


For relief and educational pur- 




poses ..... 


7,980 19 


Taxes of 1915, account 141 Web- 




ster St., Maplewood 


97 95 


Miscellaneous- .... 


47 92 


Total current expenses . 


$10,693 23 


Income invested 


9,000 00 


Cash on hand .... 


817 52 



$20,510 75 



Value of investments, $393,500.59. 



FRENCH BENEVOLENT AND RELIEF ASSOCIATION, 372 Boylston St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1915.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Andre Gay, President; Victor G. Darmand, Secretary; Louis 
Poupee, Treasurer. 

To help French destitute or needy families, especially those 
affected by the war. 



66 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 15 to 20. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Profits of two balls 



$782 82 
521 31 



$1,304 13 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

To beneficiaries . 
Expenses of two balls 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$10 00 

240 66 

94 29 

374 43 

$719 38 

584 75 

$1,304 13 



FRENCH WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, 28 Apple ton St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. David R. Craig, President; Mrs. Winifred Powell, Secre- 
tary; Marcel L. Orleans, Treasurer; Miss Mathilde Corpataux, 
Matron. 

Home for French-speaking girls; secures employment. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 86, viz., 85 paying, 1 partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . ' 
Subscriptions and donations 
Sale .... 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,610 65 

95 35 

100 63 

$1,806 63 
347 73 



$2,154 36 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Provisions and supplies 

Interest on mortgage . 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$518 50 

16 03 
889 21 
237 50 
131 60 

65 47 

$1,858 31 
296 05 

$2,154 36 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,250; amount of mortgage on same, $4,750. 



GERMAN AID SOCIETY OP BOSTON, 43 Chardon St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1848.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

C. W. Holtzer, President; Oscar A. Schmidt, Secretary; Sebas- 
tian Gahm, Treasurer; John Kalbskopf, Agent. 

Aids German immigrants to find employment, provides tem- 
porary support, and gives material relief to poor German resi- 
dents in Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 693.; number of families aided, 240. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



67 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $861 00 

Income from investments . . 1,681 01 

Miscellaneous . . . . 6 81 

Total current receipts . . $2,548 82 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 870 74 



$3,419 56 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup> 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Telephone 

Treasurer's bond and safe rent 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$600 00 

112 63 

2,019 46 

33 95 

30 00 
42 00 
35 00 
20 65 

$2,893 69 
279 68 
246 19 

$3,419 56 



Value of investments, $37,985.37. 



GERMAN LADIES' AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON (ALTENHEIM) , 
Centre St., West Roxbury. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending October, 1916. 

Mrs. Lizzie Munz, President; Mrs. Jacobina Schriftgiesser, 
Secretary; Miss Anna Bauer, Treasurer. 

Assists needy German widows and orphans, and maintains a 
home for aged German men and women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided during year, 16. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Membership dues 
Whist party 
Kaffee Klatsch . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts 
Drawn from cash account 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



. $50 50 


. 314 


80 


. 337 


00 


11 


49 


22 


00 


5 00 


. $740 79 


26 


37 


r 42 


77 


$809 


93 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$45 00 


Printing, postage and office supplies 


20 06 


Provisions and supplies 


362 00 


Altenheim fund .... 


168 50 


Shoes and underwear . 


110 36 


Christmas expense 


26 37 


Miscellaneous .... 


21 50 


Total current expenses 


$753 79 


Cash on hand 


56 14 



$809 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$48,266.82; value of investments, $16,341.90. 



GIRLS' FRIENDLY SOCIETY HOME, Milford, New Hampshire. (Incor- 
porated 1887.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Mrs. William Lawrence, President; Mrs. James F. Hunnewell, 
Secretary; Harold Peabody, 302 Berkeley St., Boston, Treasurer. 
Vacation home for the members of the Girls' Friendly Society. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 
Number aided during year, 407, all paying. 



68 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board from girls 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans ..... 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$1,981 26 


Salaries and wages 


$537 43 


457 30 


Printing, postage and office sup 




2,219 25 


plies .... 


110 36 


26 71 


Provisions and supplies 


1,966 13 




Opening and shutting houses 


158 20 




$4,684 52 


Heat, light and power 


73 88 


700 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




599 01 


pairs 


352 61 




Taxes and insurance . 


316 00 




Drives and station work 


995 32 




Repairs .... 


883 10 




Care of trees 


50 00 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


260 87 




$5,703 90 




Cash on hand . 


279 63 


$5,983 53 


$5,983 53 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
),000; value of investments, $9,942.35. 



GOOD WILL INDUSTRIES OF AMERICA, INC. (formerly NATIONAL 
CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRIAL RELIEF ASSOCIATION), 31-33 Corn- 
ing St., Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

George E. Henry, President; Fred C. Moore, Secretary; David 
Dunbar, Treasurer; Rev. Edgar J. Helms, Superintendent. 

To superintend and encourage the establishment in various 
cities of branch industrial relief associations for the religious, 
educational and industrial welfare of the poor. 



Dr. 
Interest .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$0 84 
33 38 



$34 22 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office supplies 
Surety bond .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



SI 50 
12 50 



$14 00 
20 22 



$34 22 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$100,000; amount of mortgage on same, $40,000. 



THE GUILD OF ST. ELIZABETH, 59 East Springfield St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Miss Maud M. Rockwell, President; Mrs. Edna M. Blake, Sec- 
retary; Miss Alice F. Murray, Treasurer; Mrs. Rose Simmons, 
Matron. 

Benevolent work among children of the poor of all nationalities 
and creeds, including day nursery. 

Number of paid employees, 5. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



69 



Number aided during year, 364, viz., 197 paying, 24 partly pay- 
ing, 143 free; number of families aided, 178. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Honorary members 

Members' fees . 

Day nursery 

Entertainments 

Summer outing . 

Interest 



$348 45 

760 00 

96 00 

673 13 

1,225 13 

12 00 

27 15 



Total current receipts . . $3,141 86 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 288 20 



$3,430 06 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup' 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Insurance on mortgage 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Expense for entertainments 

Summer outing 

Telephone 

Insurance 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . 



$1,459 50 

91 52 

525 47 
350 00 
236 98 

143 48 

166 87 

10 00 

32 01 

12 80 

6 30 

$3,034 93 
395 13 

$3,430 06 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$8,000; amount of mortgage on same, $7,000; value of invest- 
ments, $500. 



HALE HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 6 Garland St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1897.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Thomas P. Beale, Jr., President; John H. Oakes, Clerk; Edward 
C. Fitz, Treasurer; Ernest C. Amy, Head Resident. 

To foster a spirit of individual independence and neighborhood 
co-operation and to promote good citizenship. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 16. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


. $12,590 75 


Salaries and wages . 


$5,489 39 


Income from investments . 


682 02 


Printing, postage and office sup- 








plies .... 


309 80 






Total current receipts . 


. $13,272 77 


Provisions and supplies 


399 26 






Rent .... 


660 00 






Heat, light and power 


416 50 






Furnishings and incidental re 








pairs .... 


418 89 






Interest on mortgage 


212 00 






Clubs, classes, etc. . 


193 40 






Telephone 


136 95 






Insurance ... 


31 15 






Special purposes (classes, etc.) 


5,064 05 


« 


of 


Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


85 79 


Cash on hand at beginning 


$13,417 18 


year .... 


1,427 47 


Cash on hand . 


1,283 06 




$14,700 24 


$14,700 24 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,246.77; amount of mortgage on same, $5,300; value of invest- 
ments, $12,971.51. 



70 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HARRIET TUBMAN HOUSE, 25 Holyoke St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1906.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Julia 0. Henson, President; Mrs. Annie Young, Secretary; 
Mrs. Cornelia M. Robinson, Superintendent. 

Home for young colored working women, with home comforts, 
at the lowest possible cost; an employment bureau maintained. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 91, all paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $759 63 

Subscriptions and donations . 615 00 

Entertainments . . . 231 65 

Miscellaneous .... 3 68 

Total current receipts . . SI, 609 96 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2-17 11 



81,857 07 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Supplies .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Water rates and telephone . 

On mortgage 

Interest on mortgage . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$252 50 

18 75 

62 27 
268 99 

113 80 
21 21 

500 00 
200 00 

$1,437 52 
419 55 

$1,857 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; amount of mortgage on same, 63,500. 



HEBREW CHESED SHEL EMAS OF THE SOUTH END OF BOSTON, 8 

Lovering St., Boston. (Incorporated 1916.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Max Gilman, President; Samuel Cohen, Secretary; Benjamin 
Cohen, Treasurer. 

Burial, according to the rites and customs of the Jewish reli- 
gion, of deceased persons who have left no means. 

Number aided during year, 16, viz., 5 partly paying, 11 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 



$399 75 



$399 75 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Rent 

For burials .... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$49 36 

9 It 

224 57 

40 00 

$323 05 
76 70 

$399 75 



Part II.] CHAEITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



71 



THE HEBREW FREE LOAN SOCIETY, 532 Warren St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Nathan Pinanski, President; Louis Pokroisky, Secretary; Silig 
Lipsky, Treasurer. 

Lends money to those in need, irrespective of creed, in sums of 
from $5 to $200, without interest. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 689. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Interest ..... 
From loans . . . . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$9,337 60 

8 72 

46,465 05 

$55,811 37 

206 40 



$56,017 77 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Rent .... 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs . . . . 

Work on golden book and ac 

countant 
Telephone and janitor 
Loans .... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$951 96 

357 88 
111 05 

458 47 

155 00 

25 42 

51,812 00 

$53,871 78 
2,145 99 

$56,017 77 



THE HEBREW IMMIGRANT AID SOCIETY, 31 Parmenter St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Isaac Heller, President; J. H. Stone, Secretary; Harris Poorvu, 
Treasurer. 

To aid Hebrew immigrants, particularly detained immigrants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. Employs a collector 
on commission. 

Number aided during year, about 800. 



Dr. 
Dues from members 
Donations 
Federated Charities 
Plates Congregations 
Interest 
From New York Society 
Miscellaneous . 



$1,923 16 

126 00 

550 00 

35 32 

15 78 

2,049 92 

35 00 



Total current receipts . . $4,735 18 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 985 71 



$5,720 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Collection fees . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
. plies . 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Rent . . . . 

Heat, light and power 
Telephone and telegrams 
Food, fare and clothes 
Meetings .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,445 00 
625 28 

175 35 

100 00 

300 00 

10 55 

158 50 

291 61 

71 55 

70 00 

$5,247 84 
473 05 

$5,720 89 



72 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HEBREW INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 154 Charles St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1902.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Louis Hecht, Jr., President; Miss Golde Bamber, Secretary and 
Superintendent; Albert Van Raalte, Treasurer. 

Trade and industrial training of the daughters of immigrants. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 
Number enrolled in classes, 287. 



Dr. 



Federation 

Baron de Hirsch fund 

Rent 

Interest 

Subscriptions 

Sales and work . 



$4,500 00 
500 00 
450 00 
651 81 
100 00 
56 97 



Total current receipts . . $6,258 78 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 466 54 



$6,725 32 



Cr. 



Salaries 

Expenses 

Rent 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,036 25 

1,992 45 

900 00 

$5,928 70 
796 62 



$6,725 32 



Value of investments, $18,000. 



HEBREW LADIES' MOSHEV ZEKAINIM ASSOCIATION, 21 Queen St., 
Dorchester. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Max Lebowich, President; Harris Koritz, Secretary; Fannie R. 
Titlebaum, Treasurer; Rose Y. Becker, Matron. 

Home for Jewish men and women not less than sixty years of 
age, living in Boston or vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 103. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Entertainments 
Tenth anniversary fund 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$5,302 50 

11,091 28 

25 00 

430 00 

419 09 

5,917 25 


$23,185 12 
1,900 25 

24 20 





$25,109 57 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $4,294 53 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 465 81 

Provisions and supplies . . 8,715 59 
Heat, light and power . . 1,243 48 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 1,083 06 

Paid on mortgage . . . 1,000 00 

Interest ... . . . 127 38 

Collections .... 1,479 05 

Loans paid .... 4,850 00 

Miscellaneous .... 1,835 23 

Total current expenses . . $25,094 13 

Cash on hand . . . . 15 44 

$25,109 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$55,000. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



73 



HEBREW WOMEN'S SEWING SOCIETY, 154 Charles St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending May 7, 1916. 

Mrs. J. M. Herman, President; Mrs. I. K. E. Prager, Secretary; 
Mrs. L. Baer, Treasurer. 

To clothe and befriend the Jewish poor, and give recreation to 
poor children and mothers of the Jewish faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 2,524, viz., 1,643 children, 881 
adults. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$167 00 


Salaries and wages 




$816 40 


Income from investments . 


371 81 


Printing, postage and office 


sup- 




Federated Jewish Charities 


6,200 00 


plies .... 




37 04 


Miscellaneous .... 


72 48 


Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 




4,804 75 
450 00 






Total current receipts 


$6,811 29 


To beneficiaries for sewing . 




450 00 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


202 14 


Kindergarten and expenses of class 








for mothers . 




125 00 






Insurance 




10 20 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses • . 




118 37 




$6,811 76 






Cash on hand . 




201 67 




$7,013 43 


$7,013 43 



Value of investments, $11,050. 

THE HOLY CHILD DAY NURSERY, 100 High St., Charlestown. (Incor- 
porated 1912.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Alice A. Cook, President; Ethel M. Cook, Secretary; Elizabeth 
R. Teaffe, Treasurer; Mrs. Helen L. Finnegan, Matron. 

Day care of children of six years and under whose mothers are 
obliged to work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of days' care, 4,705. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $235 25 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,038 03 

Total current receipts . . $1,273 28 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 21 84 



$1,295 12 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Interest on mortgage . * . 
Water rates 
Entertainments 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand at end of year 



$662 50 

30 25 

305 85 

96 83 

85 30 
85 00 
10 58 
10 00 

$1,286 31 
8 81 

$1,295 12 



74 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$2,500; mortgage on same, $2,000. 



HOLY TRINITY CATHOLIC SCHOOL AND SOCIETY (ST. FRANCIS 
ORPHANAGE AND HOME FOR AGED), Fulda St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending December, 1915. 

Rev. Joseph Faber, S.J., President and Treasurer; Matthias 
Brock; Secretary; Sister Mary Salome, O.S.F., Matron. 

Home for children (boys from three to twelve years, inclusive; 
girls, three to sixteen years, inclusive); also aged women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 42, viz., 19 paying, 16 partly pay- 
ing, 7 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $898 17 

Board . . . . . 2,657 93 

Miscellaneous . . . . 189 50 

Total current receipts . . $3,745 60 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 397 25 



$4,142 85 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Clothes and shoes 

Medicine .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$610 00 

44 62 

2,035 06 

278 09 

324 50 

353 55 

55 42 

98 23 

$3,799 47 
343 38 

$4,142 85 



HOME FOR AGED COUPLES, 409-417 Walnut Ave. and 2055 Columbus 
Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Elizabeth Abbott Carleton, President; Gladys L. Rounds, Secre- 
tary; Arthur H. Damon, Treasurer; H. C. Wingate and Elizabeth 
Harley, Matrons. 

Protestant home for American couples who have seen better 
days and are upwards of sixty-five years of age. Admission fee, 
$400, and conveyance of property to the Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 23. 

Number aided during year, 89. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



75 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$1,800 00 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,205 00 


Annuities .... 


1,084 04 


Income from investments 


40,715 38 


Life membership 


50 00 


Miscellaneous 


918 16 


Total current receipts . 


$45,772 58 


Liquidation dividends 


200 30 


Sales of rights and exchange of 




bonds .... 


85 20 


Legacies and insurance proceeds 


50,274 01 


Sale of East Boston property . 


2,020 25 


Sale of securities 


20,120 64 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




year 


36,339 48 




$154,812 46 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$8,623 41 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


226 22 


Provisions, supplies and cloth- 




ing 


11,252 96 


Safety vaults 


115 00 


Heat, light, power and tele- 




phone .... 


2,574 21 


Renewals and incidental repairs 


911 90 


Fire escape account and fire 




extinguishers 


10,593 23 


Burial lot, Forest Hills . 


3,000 00 


Treasurer's bond and insurance 


839 11 


Hospital, medicine and funerals 


1,205 89 



Total current expenses 
Securities purchased, etc. 
Cash on hand 



$39,341 93 
95,515 00 
19,955 53 

$154,812 46 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$203,100; value of investments, $926,688.38. 



HOME FOR AGED COLORED WOMEN, 22 Hancock St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1864.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Joseph P. Loud, President; Miss Lucy Parsons, Clerk; Robert 
Homans, Treasurer; Miss Mary E. Armstead, Matron. 

Support of indigent aged colored women in the Home and par- 
tial support of other such women outside the Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 19; outside institu- 
tion, 48. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



Cr. 



$454 01 


Salaries and wages . 


. $2,171 24 


1,000 00 


Printing, postage and office sup 




7,646 10 


plies .... 


3 79 


5 00 


Provisions and supplies 


2,523 22 




Heat, light and power 


465 85 




$9,105 11 


Furnishings and incidental re 






pairs .... 


705 11 


1,135 56 


Outside aid 


2,766 00 




Insurance 


12 00 




Telephone and water rates 


111 73 




Interest .... 


271 52 




Care of cemetery lots 


12 50 




Insurance 


104 80 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


32 08 




$9,179 84 




Cash on hand . 


1,060 83 


$10,240 67 


$10,240 67 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,000; value of investments, $163,998.50. 



76 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HOME FOB AGED MEN, 133 West Springfield St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1860.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles E. Rogerson, President; Charles A. Coolidge, Secretary; 
Charles W. Jones, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary A. Stevens, Superin- 
tendent. 

Home or outside aid for respectable. worthy men, at least fifty- 
five years of age, who have resided in Boston during the ten years 
preceding their application for relief. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 20. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 49; outside institu- 
tion, 98. 

Cr. 
Wages $8,782 93 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments 
Legacies . 
Admission fees 
Edward Austin fund 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$2,950 00 
36,673 11 
46,696 06 

600 00 
1,200 00 

613 04 

$88,732 21 
2,603 33 



$91,335 54. 



Printing, postage and advertising 
Provisions and supplies 
Insurance 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Improvements 
Outside beneficiaries 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Investments 
Cash on hand . 



716 54 
7,176 49 

939 66 
2,324 39 

1,614 50 

3,565 68 

17,281 00 

1,450 08 

$43,851 27 

47,216 89 

267 38 

$91,335 54 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $799,297.80. 



HOME FOB AGED WOMEN, 108 Revere St., Boston. (Incorporated 1849.' 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Winthrop H. Wade, President; Frank W. Kaan, 1 Secretary; 
William P. Blake, 1 Treasurer; Dora E. Roberts, Matron. 

Home for women of American parentage who have resided in 
Boston for ten years preceding application for admission and who 
are at least sixty-five years of age. Admission fee, $150. Assist- 
ance given to those outside of the Home and to aged nurses, 
being beneficiaries of the Doane and Edward Austin funds. 

Number of paid officers or employees, about 40. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 85; outside institu- 
tion, 115. 



1 Frederic A. Turner, Jr., secretary since April 26, 1916; Frank W. Kaan, treasurer since April 
26. 1916. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



a 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$1,950 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$16,070 96 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,122 09 


Provisions and supplies 


13,152 00 


Annuities . 


4,850 00 


Heat, light, power and water 


4,379 75 


Income from investments . 


43,942 75 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Sale of old material . 


33 40 


pairs ..... 
To outside beneficiaries and ex- 
penses .... 


1,239 58 


Total current receipts . 


$51,898 24 


6,976 37 


Income investments paid off 


1,600 00 


To beneficiaries of Edward 




From principal, excess of ex- 




Austin fund .... 


1,300 00 


penses 


4,754 10 


To beneficiaries of the Doane 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




fund ..... 


5,850 00 


year 


2,022 51 


Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


6,994 45 




$55,963 11 






Cash on hand .... 


4,311 74 




$60,274 85 


$60,274 85 



Value, of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$200,612.29; value of investments, $921,255.31. 



HOME FOR DESTITUTE CATHOLIC CHILDREN OP BOSTON, 788 Harri- 
son Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1864.) 

Report for year ending January 13, 1916. 

James W. Dunphy, President; William J. Porter, Secretary; 
John A. Bruen, Treasurer; Daniel J. Pyne, Superintendent. 

Temporary care of destitute Catholic children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year in institution, 1,458; number of 
children cared for in foster homes, 846. Number of placing-out 
visitors, 2. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests ..... 
Income from investments . 
Ladies' Aid Society . 
Rents, real estate 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . ... 



$7,683 51 
5,050 48 
4,464 40 

13,787 76 
641 76 


$31,627 91 
2,000 00 

6,268 79 


$39,896 70 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $6,745 00 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . . . . 624 27 

Provisions and supplies . . 13,440 13 

Heat, light and power . . 1,547 25 

Furnishings and* incidental re- 
pairs 5,761 73 

Visiting agents' traveling ex- 
penses .... 2,927 87 

Miscellaneous .... 1,762 77 

Total current expenses . . $32,809 02 

Income invested . . . 4,522 64 

Cash on hand .... 2,565 04 

$39,896 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$140,000; value of investments, $146,236.67. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HOME FOR JEWISH CHILDREN, corner Canterbury and Austin Sts., Dor- 
chester. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending October 30, 1916. 

David A. Lourie, President; Mark Stone, Secretary; Hyman 
Phillips, Treasurer; Solomon Z. Prokesch, Superintendent. 
Home for destitute Jewish children (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 
Number aided during year, 230. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Federated Jewish Charities 
Leopold Morse Home 
Overseers of the poor 
Religious services 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



Cr. 



$724 37 


Salaries and wages 




$8,422 05 


1,000 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




24,000 00 


plies .... 


69 43 


1,750 00 


Provisions and supplies 


10,324 57 


208 00 


Interest on mortgage 


650 00 


3,038 45 


Heat, light and power 


3,169 54 


22 45 


Furnishings and incidental re- 


3,331 67 








$30,743 27 


Clothing 




1,041 60 




Medical attendance 




680 29 


6 24 


Water . 


. 


452 40 




House necessaries 




949 51 




Laundry 




562 99 




Miscellaneous . 




842 08 




Total current expenses . 


$30,496 13 




Cash on hand . 


253 38 


$30,749 51 


$30,749 51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$90,000; amount of mortgage on same, $13,000. 



THE HOUSEHOLD NURSING ASSOCIATION, 28 Robinwood Ave., Jamaica 
Plain. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary H. Coolidge, President; Mrs. Anna L. Coolidge, Clerk; 
George W. Brainard, Treasurer; Ann E. Murray, Superintendent. 
Care of sick in the home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, about 45. 
Number aided during year, 950. 



from 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Interest . 

Telephone charges repaid 
Rent received and receipts 

meals . 
Refund on overpayment 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$15,064 02 


3,550 


00 


6 


91 


21 


11 


1,362 23 


38 


13 


16 


17 


$20,058 


57 


351 


93 


«9n 4i n 


KO 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Rent 

Heat and light 

Telephone 

House expense, including maid'i 
service 

Car fares 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$17,400 85 

177 39 
639 77 
211 06 
306 23 

852 39 

147 30 

40 03 

$19,775 02 
635 48 

$20,410 50 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



79 



HOUSE OF THE ANGEL GUARDIAN, 11 Perkins St., Jamaica Plain. (In- 
corporated 1853.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Brother Jude, President and Treasurer; Brother Cleophas, Sec- 
retary. 

Home for destitute and orphan boys; also for delinquent chil- 
dren, to save them from commitment; gives educational and in- 
dustrial training. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 660, viz., 158 paying, 277 partly 
paying, 225 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in' 

come .... 
Income from investments 
Board and clothing 
Earnings of industrial school 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$1,262 24 
19,636 07 



6,569 64 

2,728 53 

23,727 31 

5,555 99 

873 55 

$60,353 33 
95,000 00 

802 57 

$156,155 90 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies . 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Construction of new home 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$6,829 32 

340 09 

30,737 17 

1,379 87 

204 88 

108,359 65 

2,376 08 

$150,227 06 
5,928 84 



$156,155 90 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$371,900; amount of mortgage on same, $50,000; value of invest- 
ments, $47,000. 



HOUSE OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN, corner Francis and Binney Sts., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1861.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Joseph S. Bigelow, President; Miss Catherine A. Codman, 
Secretary; Francis W. Hunnewell, Treasurer; Miss Louise M. 
Coleman, Superintendent. 

A hospital for white women and children, without condition of 
religion, nationality or residence; also a day camp for tubercu- 
losis patients. 

Number of paid officers or employees, about 25. 

Number of beds, 64. 

Number aided during year, 238. 



80 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $15,171 23 

Annuities and bequests to income 10,450 00 

Income from investments . . 14,834 23 

Miscellaneous .... 228 58 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$40,684 04 



123 52 



$40,807 56 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . 

Chaplain by will 

Insurance and box vault . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$10,233 94 

346 15 

11,397 94 

4,601 32 

3,836 05 
400 00 
783 59 
772 38 

$32,371 37 

8,221 87 
214 32 

$40,807 56 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$300,000; value of investments, $334,000. 

HOUSE OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, 841 Huntington Ave., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1870.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Sister M. Anselm, 
Secretary; Sister M. Florence, Treasurer and Superintendent. 

Protection of girls in danger. Education, mental and manual, 
of unfortunate women and girls, without distinction of race or 
creed. 

Number of paid employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 527, viz., 8 partly paying, 519 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Interest .... 

Industries 

Board and other sources . 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$6,395 48 

161 67 

72,514 45 

1,100 00 

$80,171 60 

2,873 72 



$83,045 32 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $8,664 19 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 1,178 41 



Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



36,370 33 
1,188 15 
9,561 60 

13,099 54 

$70,062 22 
12,983 10 

$83,045 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$405,000; value of investments, $30,819.73. 



HOWARD BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1818.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Rev. Daniel W. Waldron, President; Dr. Winfred B. Bancroft, 
Secretary; John A. Bent, Treasurer. 

Relief of the sick and destitute in the city of Boston. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



81 



Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number of families aided, 998. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From special trust fund 



$393 00 

13,636 97 

9,600 29 



$23,630 26 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Rent 

Groceries, coal, wood, etc. 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Excess to capital 



Value of investments, $510,912.17. 



$675 00 

186 65 

100 00 

. 19,782 48 

392 56 

. $21,136 69 
2,493 57 

$23,630 26 



HUNT ASYLUM FOR DESTITUTE CHILDREN, 10 Eden St., Charlestown. 

(Incorporated 1834.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Frank Dow, President; William P. Hart, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

To aid and provide homes, temporary or permanent, for desti- 
tute Protestant children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $22 00 

Income from investments . . 2,237 88 

Total current receipts . . $2,259 88 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,018 14 



$3,278 02 

Value of investments, $41,525.73. 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $25 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 25 00 

Board 1,074 42 

Clothing 61 54 

Supervision . . .* . 47 65 

Total current expenses . . $1,233 61 

Income invested . . . 1,566 56 

Cash on hand . . . . 477 85 

$3,278 02 



HUNTINGTON INSTITUTE FOR ORPHAN CHILDREN, 147 Milk St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Horatio A. Lamb, President; Robert B. Stone, Clerk; Robert 
H. Hallowell, Treasurer. 

Providing care and maintenance for needy orphan children, 
and ministering to the welfare of such children through the 
medium of other agencies. (At present the work is done through 
the Boston Children's Aid Society as agents.) 



82 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $12,708 95 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 420 03 



$13,128 98 



Cr. 

Accounting, bookkeeping, etc. . $118 07 

Rent of safe deposit vault . . 20 00 

Premium on bond . . . 25 00 

Boston Children's Aid Society . 11,452 45 

Total current expenses . . $11,615 52 

Cash on hand .... 1,513 46 



$13,128 



Value of investments, $239,180.24. 

IMMIGRANTS' HOME, 72 and 74 Marginal St., East Boston. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending July 1, 1916. 

Frank H. Tilton, M.D., President; Miss Mary W. Perry, 
Secretary; Miss Hattie B. Cooper, Treasurer; Mrs. A. C. Clark, 
Superintendent. 

To furnish protection and necessary assistance to immigrants, 
especially women and children, arriving in Boston on all lines of 
steamers. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 323, viz., 103 paying, 12 partly 
paying, 208 free. Helped on piers, 1,727. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $836 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,364 46 

Miscellaneous . . . . 5 19 

Total current receipts . . $3,205 65 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 373 62 



$3,579 27 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage, telephone and 
office supplies 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 

Travel 

Charity 

Insurance 

Cemetery lot 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



. $1,107 63 



82 26 

1,149 24 

147 74 

223 74 

19 75 

2 00 

-104 80 

207 00 

$3,044 16 
535 11 

$3,579 27 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes^ 
$35,175. 



INDUSTRIAL AID SOCIETY, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1847.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

William P. Fowler, President; Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, Secre- 
tary; William Atherton, Treasurer; Henry Peterson, General Agent. 
To find employment for worthy men and women. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



83 



Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 2,710. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $983 00 

Income from investments . . 2,931 09 

Payment on mortgage and rights 216 25 



Total current receipts • » - $4,130 34 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 919 83 



$5,050 17 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Heat, light and power 
Telephone 

Annual reports . 

Appropriations from Joy fund 
Safe deposit box 
Office expenses . 

Total current expenses . 
Invested .... 
Cash on hand . 



Value of investments, $64,300. 



$3,630 00 

77 70 

99 91 
101 82 

55 00 
265 00 

15 00 
161 55 



$4,405 98 
144 19 
500 00 

$5,050 17 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR CRIPPLED AND DEFORMED CHILDREN, 
241 St. Botolph St., Boston. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

J. Grafton Minot, President; Thomas K. Cummins, Secretary; 
E. Pierson Beebe, Treasurer; Miss Mary M. Perry, Superintendent. 

Education and special training of crippled and deformed chil- 
dren. Admission at five years; no restrictions as to sex, color, 
nationality or creed; no mental defectives taken. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 32. 

Number aided during year, 146. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$10,140 94 


Salaries and wages . 


$17,707 81 


Income from investments . 


20,434 57 


Printing, postage and office sup 




Entertainments 


8,217 79 


plies .... 


9 46 






Provisions and supplies 


4,772 41 






Total current receipts . 


$38,793 30 


Heat, light and power 


1,503 39 


Annuities and bequests to income 


36,230 00 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Cash on hand at beginning of 




pairs .... 


2,626 54 


year 


79 62 


Insurance 


439 51 






Transportation 


4,154 55 






Telephone 


. 269 43 






Auditing 


20 00 






Annual report . 


237 94 






Advertising . . . 


243 36 






Relief committee 


215 00 






Rent of safe 


30 00 






Summer sales room . 


510 35 






Industrial departments 


344 84 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


234 34 




$33,318 93 






Transferred to capital 


39,621 25 






Cash on hand . 


2,162 74 




$75,102 92 


$75,102 92 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$200,000; value of investments, $475,000. 



84 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, 232 Centre St., Dorchester. (Incor- 
porated 1855.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Miss Eleanor S. Parker, President; Mrs. Ellerton James, Secre- 
tary; Robert S. Sturgis, Treasurer; Mrs. B. A. Capron, Matron. 

Training school and home for girls of good character, between 
ten and fifteen years of age, without restriction as to color, na- 
tionality, religion or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 27, viz., 11 partly 
paying, 16 free; outside institution, 10. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $526 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,271 00 

Bequests .... 500 00 

Income from investments . . 5,896 89 

Miscellaneous . . . . 153 29 

Total current receipts . . $9,347 18 

Sale of securities . . . 4,975 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,019 00 



$15,341 18 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup> 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Laundry and cleaning 
Light and telephone 
Furnishing, clothing and inciden 

tal repairs 
Matron's allowance and travel 

ing expenses ■ . 

Garden .... 
Physician, dentist and chemist 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,628 61 

41 00 

3,068 44 
457 23 
166 08 

1,138 35 

220 47 
128 34 
289 76 
419 94 



$8,558 22 

6,234 00 

548 96 

$15,341 18 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
,400; value of investments, $118,881.16. 



INFANTS' HOSPITAL, 55 Van Dyke St., Boston. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Clarence John Blake, M.D., President; Henry W. Palmer, 
Secretary; Nelson S. Bartlett, Treasurer; Miss Elinor D. Gregg, 
R.N., Superintendent. 

The care of sick infants. The training (by a postgraduate 
course) of nurses, and a course of instruction for nursery maids. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 46 (including 30 pupil 
nurses and nursery maids). 

Total number of ward beds, 33; total number of hospital pa- 
tients during year, 396; number of free patients, 168; total num- 
ber of hospital days during year, 3,956. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



85 



Dr. 
Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest and dividends 
Nursery maids' wages and fees . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . ... 

Total receipts 
From investments 
' Cash on hand at beginning of 
year (capital account) . 



1 
$3,768 80 


13,350 


00 


5,387 


53 


554 


93 


38 


43 


$23,099 


69 


1,345 


49 


$24,445 


18 


49,608 


89 


1,606 07 


K7RL fifiO 


i± 



Cr. 
Administration 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex' 

penses 
Corporation expenses 
Furniture and furnishings 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Capital invested 
Legal expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$9,508 13 

983 26 

12,190 95 

2,710 54 

96 79 

230 50 

$25,720 17 

45,605 00 

810 20 

3,524 77 



$75,660 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$217,000; amount of mortgage on same, $55,000; value of invest- 
ments, $136,818. 



INSTITUTION OF THE LITTLE SISTERS OP THE POOR, 424 Dudley St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Margaret Gillin, President; Anna Walsh, Secretary; Margaret 
Corey, Treasurer; Sister Julienne, Superior. 

Home for destitute men and women of good moral character, 
without distinction of creed or nationality, at least sixty years of 
age. 

Number aided during year, 262, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,604 56 

Annuities and bequests to income 5,974 44 

Miscellaneous . . . . 46 00 



Total current receipts . . $10,625 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 2,040 00 



$12,665 00 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Water taxes 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$28 00 
8,160 00 
1,316 67 

663 00 

205 00 

58 33 

$10,431 00 
2,234 00 

$12,665 00 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$104,100. 



INSTRUCTIVE DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION, 561 Massachusetts 
Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Ernest Amory Codman, President; Miss Ellen Hale, 
Secretary; Ingersoll Bowditch, Treasurer; Miss Mary Beard, 
Director. 



86 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Caring for the sick poor in their homes and giving instruction 
in nursing. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 62. 
Number aided during year, 14,049. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year . . . • . 



of 



$26,173 82 

27,283 93 

12,648 55 

2,048 40 

$68,154 70 

7,312 21 



$75,466 91 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent and expenses of branch 

stations 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Uniforms and supplies for nurses 
Interest .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$58,809 14 

1,826 60 
3,115 80 

975 16 
522 59 

583 59 
1,496 83 

478 89 
3,640 38 

$71,448 98 
4,017 93 

$75,466 91 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$11,724.02; value of investments, $252,702.56. 



IRWIN FUND, TRUSTEES OP THE, 35 Congress St., Boston. (Incorpo- 
rated 1914.) 

Report for year ending December 9, 1915. 

James A. Neal, President; Sumner Robinson, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Furnishing aid and comfort to deserving poor, contributing to 
the support of other Massachusetts charitable corporations, and 
educational, charitable, benevolent and religious work. 

Number aided during year, 6 individuals, 3 families and 47 
societies, agencies and corporations. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Interest .... 



$25,000 00 
46 54 



Total current receipts . . $25,046 54 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 448 71 



$25,495 25 



Cr. 
To charitable enterprises 
Cash on hand . 



$25,378 59 
116 66 



$25,495 25 



JAMAICA PLAIN DISPENSARY, Municipal Building, South St., Jamaica 
Plain. (Incorporated 1S82.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Rev. Walter Galley, President; Edward W. Brewer, Secretary; 
Ingersoll Bowditch, Treasurer. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



87 



To provide medical attendance and medicines for the sick and 
needy poor within the limits of former Ward 23. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 442. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . . 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$948 23 
23 24 

$971 47 
651 27 



$1,622 74 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Care of patients 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$500 00 

10 21 

350 56 

3 60 

$864 37 
758 37 

$1,622 74 



Value of investments, $21,405.56. 

JAMAICA PLAIN FRIENDLY SOCIETY, Municipal Building, Jamaica 
Plain. (Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Orville R. Chadwell, M.D., President; Rev. F. W. Sprague, 
Secretary; E. W. Clark, Treasurer; Katherine Williamson, Agent. 

To relieve temporary distress and befriend the needy, without 
regard to age, sex, color, creed or nationality, in the Jamaica 
Plain district. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided during year, 212. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,593 73 

Income from investments . . 360 00 

For special purposes . . . 142 94 

From entertainment . . . 202 00 

Cash returned . . . . 45 52 

From clubs and churches . . 185 00 

From Thanksgiving service . 16 52 

Total current receipts . . $2,545 71 

Borrowed 29 14 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 27 92 



$2,602 77 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Advisory committee . 
Coal 

Boots and shoes 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,244 86 

124 19 
426 06 
374 30 
123 36 
55 94 
77 09 

$2,425 80 
176 97 

$2,602 77 



Value of investments, $8,500. 



JAMAICA PLAIN NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 101 Carolina 
Ave., Jamaica Plain. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Miss Cornelia Bowditch, President; Mrs. Charles S. Penhallow, 
Secretary; Robert B. Stone, Treasurer; Mrs. Ivah E. Deering, 
Head Worker. 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



A neighborhood center; to promote civic betterment and main- 
tain industrial classes and clubs for boys, girls and adults, and a 
playground during the summer. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $90 50 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,953 25 

Income from investments . . 131 68 

From fairs and entertainments . 1,044 90 

Total current receipts . . $3,220 33 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1 97 



$3,222 30 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 






$1,929 21 


Printing, postage, office 


supplies 




and general expense 






218 32 


Provisions and supplies 






108 74 


Rent and maintenance of flat • 




273 77 


Heat, light, power and house 


ex- 




pense 






413 56 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs 






43 80 


Publishing expense 






49 4a 


Garden work 






42 08 


Christmas entertainment 






62 50 


Total current expenses 


$3,141 41 


Cash on hand . 






80 89 




$3,222 30 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$4,645.88; value of investments, $7,346.28. 



JEWISH ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, Metaphysical Club 
Rooms, 30 Huntington Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 14, 1916. 

Miss Miriam J. Bronski, President; Miss Minna C. Greenberg, 
Secretary; Mrs. Lilly K. Gould, Treasurer. 

To aid needy Jewish consumptives through the Mt. Sinai Hos- 
pital. 

Number aided during year, 26. 



Dr. 
Annual ball 

Dues ..... 

Interest ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,282 30 

159 00 

16 74 

211 00 

$1,669 04 
641 27 



$2,310 31 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies $81 20 

Rent 40 00 

Donated to individuals . . 120 50 

Expense of ball . . . 320 25 

Miscellaneous .... 252 94 

Total current expenses . . $814 89 

Cash on hand .... 1,495 42 

$2,310 31 



JEWISH CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY OF BOSTON, Boston. (Incorporated 

1914.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Mrs. N. A. Pelonsky, President; Mrs. Alexander Rose, Secre- 
tary*; Mrs. Rachel Bon, 145 Townsend St., Treasurer. 

To give vocational training to poor children; to enable them to 
become self-supporting. 



Part II.l 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and dues 

Happy day fund 

Proceeds of Flower day 

From 1916 ball . . . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$512 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




119 75 


plies .... 


$137 72 


82 00 


Expenses of ball 


567 80 


1,902 77 


Loan 


50 00 




Rent .... 


58 00 




$2,616 52 


Weekly and monthly allowances 


1,453 50 


2,382 19 


Business colleges and supplies 


340 70 




Graduation clothes, etc. 


148 61 




Country week . 


25 00 




Milk and Baby Hygiene Associa- 






tion .... 


10 00 




Dues to conference board . 


5 00 




Home for convalescents 


25 00 




Milk .... 


8 19 




Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 


63 80 




$2,893 32 




Cash on hand . 


2,105 39 


$4,998 71 


$4,998 71 



JOHN BOYLSTON'S CHARITABLE DONATIONS FOR THE BENEFIT 
AND SUPPORT OF AGED POOR PERSONS AND OF ORPHANS AND 
DESERTED CHILDREN, TRUSTEES OF, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1803.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

William H. Hardy, Secretary; William P. Fowler, Chairman and 
Treasurer. 

Aid of persons over fifty years of $ge who have seen better 
days, and support of orphans and deserted children until fourteen 
years of age; settlement in Boston required. 

Number aided during year, 40. 



Dr. 

Income from investments 



$7,411 58 



Total current receipts . . $7,411 58 

Sale of bank stock . . . 5,535 88 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,060 01 



$16,007 47 



Cr. 
Cash grants and pensions . 
Board of children 

Total current expenses . 
Paid for city of Boston notes 
Cash on hand . 



$725 00 
4,304 27 

$5,029 27 
5,570 28 
5,407 92 

$16,007 47 



Value of investments, $202,000. 



JOHN HOWARD INDUSTRIAL HOME, 560 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Howard N. Brown, President; Howard W. Brown, Secre- 
tary; Redington Fiske, Treasurer; Albert Arnold, Superintendent. 

Home for discharged prisoners. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 773, all free; outside 
institution, 966, all free. 



90 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $7,646 71 

Annuities and bequests to income 8,500 00 

Income from investments . . 1,321 95 

Woodyard receipts . . . 17,171 68 

Fire loss 4,256 74 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$38,897 08 
1,947 72 



$40,844 80 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Stable and horses 

Sale of wood . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$3,451 00 

1,853 81 
4,058 14 
1,188 40 

274 35 

1,377 08 

8,548 28 

4,749 72 



$25,500 78 

13,702 28 

1,641 74 

$40,844 80 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,750; value of investments, $33,102.50. 



LADIES' HELPING HAND AUXILIARY TO THE HOME FOR DESTITUTE 
JEWISH CHILDREN, 615 Canterbury St., Dorchester. (Incorporated 
1908.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Louis Sonnabend, President; Mrs. E. Friedman, Secretary; 
Mrs. George Wyner, Treasurer. 

To aid the Home for Jewish Children; to work for the comfort 
and welfare of the childreti of the Home, so that they may be 
self-supporting when they leave the Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, about 25. 

Employs a collector on commission. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Dance and whist 
Winthrop performance 
Majestic Theatre performance 
May sale .... 
Interest .... 
Miscellaneous . 



$2,117 40 

1,018 40 

141 00 

672 00 

2,044 10 

59 18 

2 00 



Total current receipts . . $6,054 08 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,665 39 



$8,719 47 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Rent 

Installing carpenter shop 
Wall around Home 
Clothing for children . 
Fruit for children 
Carfare for children . 
Dental room supplies 
Two typewriters 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$712 47 

169 98 
28 00 

118 23 
4,238 00 

147 27 
71 45 

130 14 
55 55 

100 00 



$5,771 09 

2,948 38 

$8,719 47 



LADIES' UNITY CLUB, 64 Bartlett St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Carolyn E. Bell, President; Mrs. Ina F. Main, Secretary; 
Miss Carrie J. Littlefield, Treasurer; Mrs. Amanda M. Lydston, 
Matron. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



91 



Home for aged women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,500 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,189 91 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,347 63 

Interest 341 82 

Total current receipts . . $5,379 36 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 414 92 



$5,794 28 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs 
Drugs, undertaker and nurse 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$892 43 

24 50 

1,065 28 
288 49 

632 77 
321 68 
230 30 

$3,455 45 
2,338 83 

$5,794 28 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $7,538.19. 

LEND-A-HAND SOCIETY, 101 Tremont St., Boston. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Rev. Christopher R. Eliot, President; Mrs. Martha Adams 
Leland, Secretary; Josiah M. Fowler, Treasurer; Miss Annie F. 
Brown, Superintendent. 

Union of Lend-a-Hand clubs to meet emergencies, assist in 
charitable work, etc.; provides vacations for needy men. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Bequests 

Bequest to be invested 
Special charities 
Cash on hand . 



$4,613 73 

2,229 46 

139 85 

$6,983 04 

3,100 00 

3,007 39 

1,590 19 

669 69 



$15,350 31 



Cr. 



Salaries .... 


. $1,636 00 


Rent .... 


399 96 


Lend-a-Hand Book Mission 


1,167 25 


Outings .... 


520 15 


Special charities 


1,603 84 


Donations 


306 15 


Printing and postage 


328 89 


Miscellaneous . 


182 50 



Total current expenses . 
Bequests invested 
Cash held for special charities 
Cash on hand . 



$6,144 74 


6,120 


54 


1,033 


14 


2,051 


89 



$15,350 31 



Value of investments, $56,070.75. 



LINCOLN HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 68 and 80 Emerald St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1696.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Mrs. B. Preston Clark, President; Miss Margaret Pitkin, Secre- 
tary; B. Preston Clark, Treasurer; John D. Adams, Director in 
Charge. 



92 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Neighborhood work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 24. 

Number aided during year, 950, viz., 750 partly paying, 200 
free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 


. $1,331 45 

. 17,486 64 

493 67 


Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 


812,421 23 

651 13 

4,409 41 

87 00 

1,306 37 

2,029 46 
614 25 


Total current receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 


. $19,311 76 
of 

4,899 59 




821,518 85 
2,692 50 




824,211 35 


824,211 35 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$102,000; value of investments, $6,070.63. 



THE LUTHERAN IMMIGRANT BOARD, 11 Henry St., East Boston. (In- 
corporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Rev. Anders M. Benander, President; Hilding C. Lawson, 
Secretary; Rev. John A. Eckstrom, Treasurer; Ivar Loren, Super- 
intendent; Mrs. Ivar Loren, Matron. 

To protect and aid immigrants and seamen by securing for 
them suitable lodging and proper food, and to minister to their 
spiritual wants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of lodgings given during year, 7,630; number aided 
during year outside institution, 83, all free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


S3.896 70 


Salaries and wages . 


82,183 07 


Subscriptions and donations 


4,017 42 


Provisions and supplies 


2,872 34 


Annuities and bequests to income 


100 00 


Heat, light and power 


517 25 


Miscellaneous .... 


161 28 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs '. 


388 82 






Total current receipts . 


88,175 40 


Improvement . 


441 60 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Telephone . . . . 


85 14 


year . . ... 


2,567 22 


Traveling expenses . 


84 86 






Water tax . 


75 86 






Miscellaneous . . • . 
Total current expenses . 


438 34 




87,087 28 






Cash on hand . . . . 


3,655 34 




810,742 62 


810,742 62 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$26,737.56. 



Part II.-] 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



93 



MASONIC EDUCATION AND CHARITY TRUST, Masonic Temple, Boston. 

(Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 4, 1915. 

Melvin M. Johnson, President; George H. Rhodes, Secretary; 
Edwin B. Holmes, Treasurer. 

Incorporated to hold charity funds. Maintains home for 
Masons in Charlton, Mass. 

Number aided during year in home, 12. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . . $29,992 83 
Cash paid for charity in 1914 re- 
turned . . . 200 00 


Cr. 
Clerical work on records 
Rent of safe .... 
Accrued interest and premium on 
bonds ..... 
For charity (by trustees) . 
For charity (to Grand Lodge) . 

Total current expenditures 
Income invested 
Cash on hand .... 


$50 00 
100 00 

2,251 34 

1,069 00 

13,401 45 


Total current receipts . . $30,192 83 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 773 95 


$16,871 79 

12,761 47 

1,333 52 


$30,966 78 


$30,966 78 



Value of investments, $693,874.26. 

MASSACHUSETTS ASSOCIATION FOR PROMOTING THE INTERESTS 
OF THE ADULT BLIND, Boston. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

James Arnold Lowell, President; Edward E. Allen, Secretary; 
Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew, 29a Chestnut St., Boston, Treasurer. 

To promote the interests of the blind: (1) through the work for 
prevention of blindness; (2) through loans and aid to blind indi- 
viduals; (3) through contributions toward the maintenance of the 
James A. Woolson House; (4) by contributions to the support of 
the quarterly magazine, "Outlook for the Blind. " 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 115, viz., 6 paying, 
109 free; outside institution, 18. 



Dr. 

Special donations 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Board paid to Woolson House 
Massachusetts Commission for 

the Blind 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning 
year .... 



of 



$10,000 00 


5,953 


36 


1,000 


00 


148 


33 


1,284 


50 


750 00 


32 


86 


$19,169 05 


1,663 


23 


SR20.832 


28 



Cr. 
Willow fund and field worker 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . - 
Loan and aid . 

Maintenance of Woolson House . 
Shop building fund . 
Power sewer fund 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$883 33 

36 70 

781 50 

5,931 03 

997 13 

225 00 

$8,854 69 
11,977 59 



$20,832 28 



94 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$22,900; value of investments, $3,715. 



MASSACHUSETTS BABIES' HOSPITAL, 43 Hawkins St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Edward R. Warren, President; J. Prentice Murphy, Secretary; 
Walter Hunnewell, Jr., Treasurer. 

Assisting and providing for infants medically and socially. (No 
institution.) 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 80. Monthly 
average number of children under supervision in foster homes, 56. 
Number of placing-out visitors, 3. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$3,521 83 


Salaries and wages . 




$3,358 60 


Subscriptions and donations 


4,350 75 


Printing, postage, express 


and 




Annuities and bequests to income 


1,000 00 


office supplies 




165 84 


Income from investments . 


6,360 60 


Travel 




217 04 


Sale of hospital 


12,000 00 


Medical care at Boston Dispen- 




Sale of furniture 


377 31 


sary .... 




2,381 25 


Fire insurance premium refund . 


294 05 


Heat and light 




127 45 


Miscellaneous < 


39 66 


Care of children in families 
Telephone 




4,757 62 
129 36 






Total receipts 


$27,944 20 


Auditing 




209 00 


Savings bank account transferred 


892 55 


Interest on loan 




70 99 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Maintenance hospital (insurance, 




year . 


1,152 59 


interest, etc.) 




900 86 






Legal services and commission on 








sale of hospital 




1,373 83 






Mortgage paid 




10,000 00 






Loans paid 




3,000 00 






Miscellaneous . 
Total expenses 




75 33 




$26,767 17 






To Boston Children's Aid Society 


3,222 17 




$29,989 34 


$29,989 34 



Value of investments, $143,601.76. 



MASSACHUSETTS BAPTIST CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Room 525, Tremont 
Temple, Boston. (Incorporated 1821.) 

Report for year ending October 10, 1916. 

Rev. Joseph Walther, President; Rev. Charles L. Page, Secre- 
tary; John F. Barnes, Treasurer. 

To aid widows and children of deceased Baptist ministers of 
Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 57. 



Part II.] CH4RITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



95 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests to income . 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$970 09 

9,375 00 

10,918 60 

6,086 51 

$27,350 20 

7,224 34 



$34,574 54 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $375 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 250 97 

Rent ..... 50 00 

To beneficiaries . . . 11,341 17 



Total current expenses 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$12,017 14 

15,725 28 

6,832 12 

$34,574 54 



Value of investments, $253,682.64. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE EYE AND EAR INFIRMARY, 233 Charles 
St., corner Fruit St., Boston. (Incorporated 1826.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

George B. Shattuck, M.D., President; Robert Homans, Secre- 
tary; Henry Parkman, Treasurer; Frederick A. Washburn, M.D., 
Superintendent. 

Treatment of diseases of the eye and ear of poor persons, 
without regard to age, sex, color, nationality or creed; with few 
exceptions, residents of Massachusetts only. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 153 (including 30 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 214; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 4,016; number of free patients, 1,099; total number 
of hospital days during year, 366; number of free days, 29,508; 
total number of visits in out-patient department during year, 
76,017. 



Dr. 



Cr, 



Patients' payments 


$74,045 51 


Administration 


. $60,509 31 


Payments by city, town or state 


45,000 00 


Department expenses 


87,057 02 


Voluntary contributions . 


1,533 00 


Corporation expenses 


1,026 14 


Interest, dividends and rentals 


27,684 60 


Social service work 


5,707 08 


Unrestricted legacies 


1,000 00 


Aural surgeon fund 


707 62 


Bequests to income 


3,000 00 








Aural surgeon fund 


600 00 


Total expenses 


. $155,007 17 


Social service work 


960 00 


Invested 


35,371 25 






Cash on hand 


45,901 35 






Total receipts 


$153,823 11 






Bequests restricted to capital . 


2,000 00 






Receipts from income 


75 00 






Sale of securities 


51,015 90 






Cash on hand at beginning of 








year ..... 


29,365 76 








$236,279 77 


$236,279 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$563,341.62; value of investments, $573,222.41. 



96 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE FIRE SOCIETY, 87 Milk St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1794.) 

Report for year ending October 30, 1916. 

Ralph B. Williams, President; Courtenay Crocker, Secretary; 
James R. Hooper, Treasurer. 

Relief of suffering by fire, and other charitable purposes. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number aided during year, 10. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $2,374 59 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,332 70 



$3,707 29 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Payments to charitable societies 
Tools supplied to mechanics 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$300 00 

59 75 

1,300 00 

202 00 

253 55 

$2,115 30 
1,591 99 

$3,707 29 



Value of investments, $58,805.13. 



MASSACHUSETTS CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1794.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

George U. Crocker, President; Carleton Hunneman, Secretary; 
G. Glover Crocker, 50 Congress St., Boston, Treasurer. 

The relief of any member of the society, and after his decease 
the relief of his widow and children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$7,224 99 
2,007 50 



1,392 68 



$10,625 17 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Donations . . . . 

Miscellaneous . . . 

Total current expenses . 
Invested . 

Cash on hand . 



$260 00 

22 00 

2,800 00 
320 10 

$3,402 10 

6,565 00 

658 07 

$10,625 17 



Value of investments, $161,968. 



MASSACHUSETTS CONGREGATIONAL CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 50 
Congress St., Boston. (Incorporated 1736.) 

1 Report for year ending May 9, 1916. 

Winslow Warren, President; Rev. Edward Hale, Secretary; 
Grenville H. Norcross, Treasurer. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



97 



To aid widows and daughters of deceased Congregational (Uni- 
tarian and Trinitarian) ministers who have had settlements in 
Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 53. 



Dr. 

Bequests .... $1,000 00 

Income from investments . . 14,341 43 

Total current receipts . . $15,341 43 

Sale of securities . . . 21,862 50 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 14,253 89 



$51,457 82 



Cr. 

Salaries $300 00 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . . . 55 86 
Rent of safe . . . . 15 00 
To beneficiaries . . . 13,087 13 
Interest, commissions and taxes 301 42 

Total current expenses . . $13,759 41 

Reinvested .... 22,776 25 

Cash on hand .... 14,922 16 

$51,457 82 



Value of investments, $310,000. 



MASSACHUSETTS GENERAL HOSPITAL, Blossom St., Boston; McLean 
Hospital and Convalescent Hospital, Belmont. (Incorporated 1811.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Henry P. Walcott, M.D., President; John A. Blanchard, Secre- 
tary; Charles H. W. Foster, Treasurer; Frederic A. Washburn, 
M.D., Administrator. 

Relief of the sick and injured (except contagious and chronic 
cases); and at Belmont, the McLean Hospital for the care of the 
insane, and Convalescent Hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 996 (including 259 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 589; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 7,902; number of free patients, 4,253; total number 
of hospital days during year, 201,809; number of free days, 
43,357; total number of visits in out-patient department during 
year, 190,628. 



Dr. 
Patients' payments 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 

Total receipts 
Deficit from principal 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . ; . • . 



$599,379 74 

9,181 42 

197,997 75 

$806,558 91 
92,827 81 

13,360 40 



$912,747 12 



Cr. 
Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Corporation expenses 
Miscellaneous 

Total hospital expenses 
Annuities 

Interest on notes payable 
Cash on hand 



$67,627 74 
223,780 27 
350,057 82 

198,545 48 
15,992 60 
17,865 34 

$873,869 25 

4,280 00 

12,114 16 

22,483 71 

$912,747 12 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$4,432,659.55; value of investments, $3,952,326.51. 



98 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME FOR INTEMPERATE WOMEN, 2 Binney St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1916. 

Edward C. Johnson, President; Mrs. W. W. Boyden, Secretary; 
Mrs. Isabella A. Potter, Treasurer; Mrs. Mabel P. Jones, Super- 
intendent. 

The care and reformation of intemperate women. 

Number of paid officers and employees, 23. 

Number aided during year, 149, viz., 14 paying, 13 partly pay- 
ing, 122 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Laundry .... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loan ..... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$860 24 

3,533 00 

420 00 

10,144 57 

90 39 


$15,048 20 
1,500 00 

629 94 





Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
General expenses and dry goods 
Coal and gas . 
Fire escape 
Insurance 

Grain .... 
Outside laundry 
Interest .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$6,894 81 

84 25 

3,490 76 

765 41 

2,326 90 

542 00 

206 67 

307 65 

205 93 

550 00 

1,318 32 

$16,692 70 

485 44 

$17,178 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
»,100; amount of mortgage on same, $11,000; value of invest- 
ments, $12,000. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOM<EOPATHIC HOSPITAL, 82 East Concord St., 
Boston, and Allston St., Brighton. (Incorporated 1855.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Edward H. Mason, President; Ezra H. Baker, Secretary; Arthur 
F. Estabrook, Treasurer; Mrs. Alice H. Flash, Superintendent. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 302 (including 150 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 506; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 8,316; number of free patients, 3,693; total number 
of hospital days during year, 134,414; number of free days, 
57,265; total number of visits in out-patient department during 
year, 44,094. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



99 



Dr. 

Patients' payments 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Unrestricted legacies 
Income of special funds . 
Income from real estate . 



$194,144 01 

927 38 

50,243 95 

100 00 

13,549 51 

2,166 32 



$261,131 17 



Cr. 



Administration 


$16,493 58 


Professional care of patients 


55,019 99 


Department expenses 


118,306 25 


General house and property ex- 




penses . 


47,244 85 


Corporation expenses 


10,141 16 


From special funds 


3,746 24 


Real estate expenses 


4,340 68 


Permanent improvements 


2,788 75 


Annuities . 


500 00 


Total current expenses 


$258,581 50 


Transferred to capital 


2,549 67 




$261,131 17 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$627,401.24; amount of mortgage on same, $36,700; value of 
investments, $1,306,473.11. 



MASSACHUSETTS MEDICAL BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 225 Common- 
wealth Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1871.) 

Report for year ending October 17, 1916. 

Dr. George P. Shattuck, President; Dr. Robert M. Green, 
Secretary; Dr. William L. Richardson, Treasurer. 

Pecuniary assistance to members of the medical profession, 
their widows and children. 

Number aided during year, 21. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $381 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,000 00 

Income from investments . . 2,808 55 

Bond matured .... 1,000 00 



Total current receipts 



$6,189 55 



Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,666 29 



$8,855 84 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Annuities .... 
Miscellaneous . . . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$98 50 

4,175 00 

41 00 

$4,314 50 
2,041 16 
2,500 18 

$8,855 84 



Value of investments, $67,300. 



MASSACHUSETTS PRISON ASSOCIATION, 56 Pemberton Sq., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Joseph G. Thorp, President; Warren F. Spalding, Secretary; 
Francis Henry Appleton, Jr., Treasurer. 

To enlighten public opinion concerning the prevention and 
treatment of crime, secure the improvement of penal legislation, 
protect society from habitual criminals, befriend the innocent and 



100 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ignorant under accusation, promote the welfare of those placed on 
probation by the courts and also of the families of prisoners, 
assist prisoners in the work of self-reform, aid released prisoners 
in living honorably. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 395. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$40 00 


Salaries and wages 


$967 48 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,035 50 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


1,265 45 


plies ..... 


145 36 






Rent ..... 
Relief of discharged prisoners 


200 00 
701 74 


Total current receipts 


$2,340 95 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


13 76 


Obtaining work for discharged 








prisoners .... 


74 62 






Telephone . . ... 


45 00 






Typewriting and clerical work 


54 68 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses 


32 83 

* 




$2,221 71 






Cash on hand .... 


133 00 




$2,354 71 


$2,354 71 



Value of investments, $25,308.75. 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR AIDING DISCHARGED PRISONERS, 
24 State House, Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Charles Liffler, President; Fred L. Coburn, Secretary; Walter B. 
Waterman, Treasurer; George E. Cornwall, General Agent. 

To advise discharged prisoners, furnish them with aid in the 
nature of board, clothing, tools and transportation, and assist 
them to procure employment. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 873, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $463 58 

Annuities and bequests to income 3,755 60 

Total current receipts . . $4,219 18 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 591 51 



$4,810 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 
Aid to discharged prisoners 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$800 00 

46 62 

1,213 08 

36 45 

$2,096 15 
1,221 14 
1,493 40 

$4,810 69 



Value of investments, $75,614.45. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



101 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OP CRUELTY 
TO ANIMALS, 180 Longwood Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1868.) 

Report for year ending February 29, 1916. 

Dr. Francis H. Rowley, President; Guy Richardson, Secretary; 
Eben Shute, Treasurer. 

To prevent cruelty to animals by humane education of the 
igiiorant, warning of the thoughtless, and prosecution when other 
means fail. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 43 (also 13 part time). 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Bequests 

Income from investments 

Publications . 

American Humane Education 

Society 
Hospital department 
Pet department 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand 



$12,557 53 
77,648 02 
23,862 50 
19,887 33 

7,500 00 

12,326 93 

3,871 91 

$157,654 22 
16,147 60 



$173,801 82 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Publications, telephone, print- 
ing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Traveling expense, feeding and 
watering of animals 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Interest and insurance 

Advertising . 

Hospital and free dispensary 

Pet department 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$36,581 77 



23,554 40 

11,814 10 
2,908 04 

1,284 62 
2,041 39 
1,371 62 
21,003 00 
3,702 64 
269 25 

$104,530 83 
46,492 95 
22,778 04 

$173,801 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$250,000; value of investments, $478,037.16. 



MASSACHUSETTS SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY 
TO CHILDREN, 43 Mt. Vernon St., Boston. (Incorporated 1878.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Grafton D. Cushing, President; C. C. Cars tens, Secretary; John 
H. Sturgis, Treasurer; Jean G. Rood, Matron. 

To provide effective means for the prevention of cruelty to 
children throughout the Commonwealth. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 65. 

Children dealt with without court action (3,956 families repre- 
sented), 11,220; 1,138 court cases, involving 2,898 children; 210 
children, included in above figures, in Temporary Home during 
the year. 



102 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come . 
Income from investments 
Witness fees . 
Miscellaneous 



$50,293 89 

34,048 00 

16,006 14 

698 25 

80 00 



$101,126 28 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 
Office and traveling expenses . 
Interest on mortgage 

Total current expenses 
Excess of income over expenses 



$63,717 39 

2,280 38 

30,177 71 

1,125 00 

$97,300 48 
3,825 80 

$101,126 28 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; amount of mortgage on same, $25,000; value of invest- 
ments, $352,198.21. 



THE MAVERICK DISPENSARY OF EAST BOSTON, 18 Chelsea St., East 
Boston. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1916. 

Edwin F. Fobes, President; Ira M. Huggan, Secretary; John H. 
Townsend, Treasurer; Miss Katherine A. Scott, Social Worker. 

To furnish medical aid by daily clinics and by district service, 
both to relieve and to prevent disease among East Boston poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7 (including 5 part time). 

Number aided during year, 2,052. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Subrentals . 

Sale of supplies 
Sale of glasses . 
Telephone 

Total current receipts 
Loan .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,538 88 

2,502 50 

286 50 

117 72 

607 04 

16 25 


$5,068 89 

300 00 

45 49 





Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Telephone 

Laundry .... 
Furnishing eye glasses 
Refunds .... 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$5,414 38 



$3,311 18 

135 44 
351 17 
600 00 
138 14 

58 63 
87 71 
87 83 
390 28 
14 50 
17 51 

$5,192 39 
221 99 

$5,414 38 



THE MERRIMAC MISSION, INC., 105 and 107 Staniford St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Edward I. Aldrich, President; George W. Pitts, Secretary; John 
T. Mathes, Treasurer; Jacob Fritz, Superintendent. 

Ministering to the spiritual and temporal needs of unfortunate 
men, women and children, by maintaining reading, recreation, 
lunch and lodging rooms. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



103 



Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 9,082; outside insti- 
tution, 183, viz., 25 partly paying, 158 free; number of families 
aided, 130. 

Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $5,067 78 



Total current receipts . . $5,067 78 

Loans to income . . . 425 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 73 95 



$5,566 73 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Paid loans 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$2,759 92 

240 74 
475 13 
888 25 
311 79 
297 25 
425 00 
52 88 

$5,450 96 
115 77 

$5,566 73 



THE MORGAN MEMORIAL CO-OPERATIVE INDUSTRIES AND STORES, 
INC., 89 Shawmut Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Francis H. Slack, M.D., President; Kate F. Hobart, Secretary; 
F. C. Moore, Treasurer. 

Educating and extending relief to poor and destitute persons; 
improving the dwelling places and living conditions of the poor; 
and giving religious instruction. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 44. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 2,838, viz., 2,436 
partly paying, 402 free; outside institution, 554, all free; families 
aided, 466. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Sales from all departments 
Board, fees and nominal ac- 
counts .... 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts . 
Subscriptions for erection of 

Seavey building . 
Loans ..... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$27,162 90 
88,059 99 


2,295 79 
2,742 86 


$120,261 54 


35,620 19 
32,000 00 


14,220 90 


«9ft9 1H9 fi3 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Labor and relief 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies . 
Rent .... 
Heat, light and power 
Machinery and auto trucks 
Religious and educational work 
Improvements and repairs 
Children's work 
Expenses of all departments 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Seavey building 
Cash on hand 



$28,672 53 
40,869 39 

1,666 37 
15,204 59 
2,680 83 
1,211 62 
2,337 78 
4,497 25 
1,585 28 
1,500 00 
17,177 58 
5,060 25 

$122,463 47 
61,861 02 
17,778 14 

$202,102 63 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$114,167.97; mortgage on same, $29,500; value of investments, 
$37,588.12. 



104 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



MOUNT PLEASANT HOME, 59-85 Elm Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incorporated 

1901.) 

Report for year ending November 29, 1916. 

Alvin S. Dexter, President; Rev. Clarence A. Young, Clerk; 
Fred M. Lamson, Treasurer; Mrs. Lillian Maulsby, Superintend- 
ent. 

To provide a home for indigent aged persons of both sexes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 43. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $7,386 36 

Subscriptions and donations . 5,830 85 

Income from investments . . 1,159 04 

Corporation dues . . . 425 00 

Miscellaneous .... 253 51 

Total current receipts . . $15,054 76 
Cash on band at beginning of 

year 10,402 61 



$25,457 37 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$4,522 45 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


616 17 


Provisions and supplies 


5,479 42 


Heat, light and power 


1,929 58 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ' . 


400 27 


Insurance .... 


67 94 


Physicians, nurses, medicines 


1,579 08 


Burials 


204 44 


Miscellaneous . 


55 40 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$14,854 75 
3,462 04 
7,140 58 

$25,457 37 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$76,834.47; value of investments, $39,372.62. 



MT. SINAI HOSPITAL SOCIETY OF BOSTON, 17 Staniford St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Lehman Pickert, President; Philip Rubenstein, Secretary; Sid- 
ney S. Conrad, Treasurer; Starr A. Moulton, M.D., Superin- 
tendent. 

Medical and surgical aid and nursing through its dispensary to 
sick or disabled persons of any creed or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 23,746, viz., 17,634 partly paying, 
6,112 free. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS, 



105 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


. $7,940 85 


Salaries and wages . 


$7,357 95 


Dispensary receipts . 


4,217 92 


Printing, postage and office sup 








plies .... 


257 39 






Total current receipts . 


. $12,158 77 


Dispensary expenses 


2,559 18 


Loans to income 


700 00 


House officer and staff expenses 


181 85 


Cash on hand at beginning of 


Rent .... 


960 00 


year .... 


224 79 


Heat, light and power 


345 99 






Plumbing 


24 22 






Tuberculosis expense 


177 66 






Disbursements from special funds 


146 31 






Laundry . 


295 61 






Telephone 


293 57 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


73 09 




$12,672 82 






Cash on hand . 


410 74 




$13,083 56 


$13,083 56 



THE NEEDLEWOMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 149 Tremont St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1851.) 

Report for year ending April 14, 1916. 

Mrs. William M. Conant, President; Mrs. J. B. Tiernay, Secre- 
tary; Bernard C. Weld, Treasurer; Mrs. C. E. Pike, Superin- 
tendent. 

To give employment, with adequate compensation, to indigent 
needlewomen. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 90. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Sale of garments made 



$116 50 
2,150 00 
2,255 65 
5,403 01 

$9,925 16 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 2,233 93 



$12,159 09 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies . 
Materials 
Rent 

Heat, light and power 
Paid to sewing women 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,460 50 

82 06 

2,739 50 

650 00 

8 36 

4,201 69 

41 50 

12 00 

96 91 



$9,292 52 
2,866 57 

$12,159 09 



Value of investments, $49,230. 



NEW ENGLAND BAPTIST HOSPITAL, Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. . 

Edward H. Haskell, President; James A. Floyd, Secretary; Ver- 
non A. Field, Treasurer; Emma A. Anderson, Superintendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of patients; gratuitous care 
given to the sick poor. No contagious, mental or chronic cases 



106 



STATE BOARD pF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



are admitted. No restrictions as to age, sex, color, nationality, 
creed or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 48 (including 29 pupil 
nurses). 

Number of beds, 50. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 813; number 
of free patients, 121; total number of hospital days during year, 
15,087; number of free days, 1,637. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest .... 
Unrestricted legacies 
Medical and surgical supplies 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning o: 
year .... 



$45,374 93 
1,320 70 
1,539 45 
1,500 00 
4,143 39 
461 22 

$54,339 69 

2,779 36 



$57,119 05 



Cr. 



Salaries .... 


$13,356 01 


Administration 


2,324 01 


Department expenses 


18,040 11 


General house and property ex- 




penses 


3,147 86 


Office expenses 


670 92 


Interest and insurance 


327 72 


Advertising and printing . 


211 77 


Taxes .... 


115 20 


Training school 


413 91 


Fire protection 


4,333 79 


Miscellaneous . 


280 97 



Total hospital expenses . 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$43,222 27 

12,830 00 

1,066 78 



$57,119 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $56,000. 



NEW ENGLAND DEACONESS ASSOCIATION (excluding Hospitals), 
112 Water St., Boston. (Incorporated 1889, 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Willard T. Perrin, President; Mrs. Emma H. Watkins, 
Secretary; C. H. J. Kimball, Treasurer; Theodore A. Hildreth, 
Corresponding Secretary. 

District medical attendance and nursing; general philanthropic 
and relief work; fresh air and country rest home; training school 
for Christian service. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 21. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 366, all free; outside 
institution, 4,206, all free. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



107 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Net income from hospital . 
Administration expense charged 

to hospitals . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$11,946 53 
9,442 54 
1,533 67 
4,863 32 

3,511 65 
751 70 


$32,049 41 
476 73 


.«39 S9fi 14. 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage, office sup- 
plies and traveling 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light, power and water 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Interest and insurance 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand at end of year 



$12,951 94 

3,234 03 

9,026 11 

528 00 

1,639 33 

1,489 42 

1,086 68 

519 65 

1,076 82 

$31,551 98 
974 16 

$32,526 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$188,008.67; amount of mortgage on same, $23,000; value of 
investments, $39,229.43. 



NEW ENGLAND DEACONESS ASSOCIATION (Hospital in Boston), 175 
Pilgrim Rd., Fenway. (Incorporated 1889, 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. W. T. Perrin, President; Theodore A. Hildreth, Secretary; 
C. H. J. Kimball, Treasurer; Miss Adeliza A. Betts, Matron and 
Superintendent of Nurses. 

Hospital service. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 75 (including 40 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 50. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,125; number 
of free patients, 121; total number of hospital days during year, 
17,254; number of free days, 1,893. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $63,082 37 

Voluntary contributions . . 640 45 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 633 87 

Miscellaneous .... 347 71 



$64,704 40 



Cr. 



Administration 


$3,180 36 


Professional care of patients 


14,811 72 


Department expenses 


32,585 03 


General house and property ex- 




penses . 


8,985 97 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


278 00 


Total hospital expenses . 


$59,841 08 


Cash on hand at end of year 


4,863 32 




$64,704 40 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$168,000; amount of mortgage on same, $60,000; value of invest- 
ments, $18,595.88. 



108 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



NEW ENGLAND HOME FOR LITTLE WANDERERS, 161 South Huntington 
Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Arthur S. Johnson, President; Frederic D. Fuller, Secretary; 
Samuel D. Parker, Treasurer; Frederic H. Knight, Ph.D., General 
Agent and Superintendent. 

To care for homeless and destitute children from all parts of 
New England who are not mentally or physically defective, with- 
out regard to color, race, sex or religion. Usually not received 
until able to walk nor after they are twelve years of age (boys 
and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 50. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 629; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
65; in part, 112; not reimbursed, 452; monthly average number of 
children under supervision in foster homes, 490. Number of 
placing-out visitors, 12. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . . . $7,898 83 
Subscriptions and donations . 8,697 39 
Annuities and bequests to in- 
come .... 35,478 76 
Income from investments . 45,394 15 

Rents 2,640 30 

Bonds sold .... 7,231 25 

Notes negotiated . ' . . 25,000 00 

Total current receipts . . $132,340 68 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 21,123 16 



$153,463 84 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 



$27,544 42 



plies .... 


2,793 97 


Provisions and supplies . 


17,152 28 


Rent .... 


1,578 95 


Heat, light and power 


2,446 75 


Furnishings and incidental re 




pairs .... 


787 07 


Insurance and taxes 


2,298 15 


Interest on notes 


3,318 22 


New construction . 


65,937 75 


Traveling expenses 


4,196 33 


Miscellaneous 


291 52 


Total current expenses 


$128,345 41 


Cash on hand 


25,118 43 



$153,463 84 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$209,923; value of investments, $999,892. 



NEW ENGLAND HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, Dimock St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1863.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Miss Helen F. Kimball, President; Mrs. Alice B. Crosby, Secre- 
tary; George A. Goddard, Treasurer; Stella M. Taylor, M.D., 
Superintendent. 

To provide for women medical aid of competent physicians of 
their own sex. Has a training school for nurses. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



109 



Number of paid officers or employees, 99 (including 40 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 150; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 1,706; number of free patients, 307; total number of 
hospital days during year, 35,212; number of free days, 9,224; 
total number of visits in out-patient department during year, 
14,175. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries . 


$44,305 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$35,257 03 


Subscriptions and donations 


2,009 15 


Printing, postage and office sup 




Income from investments 


35,893 89 


plies .... 


1,105 09 


Dispensary receipts 


4,190 78 


Provisions and supplies . 


29,937 75 


Bequests . . 


18,089 66 


Drugs and medicines 


4,762 14 


Miscellaneous . 


582 44 


Taxes, etc. 


1,517 58 






Heat, light and power 


7,386 00 






Total current receipts . 


$105,070 92 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Sale of securities 


36,736 01 


pairs .... 


6,241 48 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Dispensary expenses 


7,545 63 


year ..'... 


2,863 29 


Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


1,034 40 




$94,787 10 






Income invested 


42,639 65 






Cash on hand 


7,243 47 




$144,670 22 


$144,670 22 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for -corporate purposes, 
$390,000; value of investments, $750,260.18. 



NEW ENGLAND KURN HATTIN HOMES, 353 Old South Building, Boston. 

(Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

George W. Coleman, President; Arthur J. Crockett, Secretary; 
George B. Graff, Treasurer. 

Aiding in the maintenance of homeless and neglected boys in 
the Kurn Hattin Homes, located in Westminster and Saxton's 
River, Vt. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 105. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,679 35 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 9 33 



$2,688 68 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $888 45 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 150 05 

Kurn Hattin Homes for supplies 1,641 00 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,679 50 
9 18 

$2,688 68 



110 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



NEW ENGLAND MORAL REFORM SOCIETY (Talitha Cumi Home), 
215 Forest Hills St., Jamaica Plain. (Incorporated 1846.) 

Report for year ending February 29, 1916. 

Dr. Caroline E. Hastings, President; Mrs. Charles A. Proctor, 
Secretary; Mrs. Arthur Perry, Jr., Treasurer; Julia Morton Plum- 
mer, M.D., General Secretary. 

Home and hospital for unmarried girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 22. 

Number aided during year, 127, viz., 29 paying, 36 partly pay- 
ing, 62 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Proceeds of annual sale 
Entertainment fund 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$2,472 18 

10,010 89 

2,804 82 

2,528 37 

1,240 00 

$19,056 26 

' 459 73 



$19,515 99 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$8,799 79 


Printing, postage and office sup 




plies .... 


703 39 


Provisions and supplies 


4,423 90 


Telephone 


188 50 


Heat, light and power 


1,624 20 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


1,500 27 


Insurance 


59 05 


Advertising 


176 46 


Travel and express . 


260 31 


Miscellaneous . 


210 15 



Total current 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$17,946 02 

1,400 00 

169 97 

$19,515 99 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$88,123; value of investments, $56,494.53. 



NEW ENGLAND PEABODY HOME FOR CRIPPLED CHILDREN, Hale St., 
Hyde Park. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Herbert A. Joslin, President; Mrs. Gilbert C. Brown, Jr., 
Secretary; Mrs. Edward B. Kellogg, Treasurer; Miss Clara M. 
Thurston, Superintendent. 

Home for destitute, crippled and deformed children under 
twelve years of age; nonsectarian (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 16. 

Number aided during year, 38, viz., 5 partly paying, 33 free. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



Ill 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Fair and entertainments . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning o: 

year .... 



$264 31 
1,905 50 
5,250 00 
2,884 90 
3,045 50 


$13,350 21 
5,000 00 

187 75 


«1« *57 Qfi 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $5,224 72 
Printing, postage, advertising 

and office supplies . . 992 25 

Provisions and supplies . . 3,539 85 

Transportation ... 181 37 

Heat, light, power and water tax 1,190 00 

Furnishings and clothing . . 1,205 00 

Telephone .... 81 29 

Insurance .... 252 30 

Surgical supplies . . . 1,073 75 

Additions and repairs . . 3,044 86 

Miscellaneous . . . . 38 86 

Total current expenses . . $16,824 25 

Cash on hand .... 1,713 71 

$18,537 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$39,000; value of investments, $77,350. 



NEWSBOYS' READING ROOM ASSOCIATION, 7 Green St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Clement S. Houghton, President; Frank C. Brewer, Secretary; 
B. Preston Clark, Treasurer; H. W. Plaisted, Superintendent. 
To establish a reading room for newsboys. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 
Number aided during year, 600, all partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $86 85 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,181 50 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,000 00 

Income from investments . . 500 37 

Kent of room . . . 223 00 

Total current receipts . . $3,991 72 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 468 06 



$4,459 78 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,022 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 44 79 

Rent 1,200 00 

Heat, light and power . . 81 60 

Miscellaneous . . . . 1 31 

Total current expenses . . $2,349 70 

Investments .... 1,328 21 

Cash on hand . . . . 781 87 

$4,459 78 



Value of investments, $11,226.10. 



NICKERSON HOME FOR CHILDREN, 125 Townsend St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1850.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Theodore Nickerson, President; Mrs. Garafelia M. Daw- 
son, Secretary; Howell F. Wilson, Treasurer; Mrs. t Lola C. Hol- 
way, Superintendent. 



112 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Home for destitute children under fourteen years of age, from 
every part of New England, especially half orphans (boys and 
girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 68, viz., 38 paying, 18 partly pay- 
ing, 12 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Fair .... 

Christmas gift . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,117 25 

949 00 

499 79 

594 47 

10 00 


$4,170 51 
856 30 


«s r»9fi si 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

Water tax 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$936 00 

98 78 

1,825 16 

280 95 

390 12 
156 25 

47 80 

$3,735 06 
1,291 75 

$5,026 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$15,000; value of investments, $12,666.91. 

NORFOLK HOUSE CENTRE (formerly SOUTH END INDUSTRIAL 
SCHOOL), 14 Eliot Sq., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles L. DeNormandie, President; Miss Margaret W. 
Thacher, Secretary; Edward J. Samson, Acting Treasurer; Roy M. 
Cushman, Director. 

To give industrial training and social opportunities to young 
people and adults in Roxbury district. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 35. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
From Norfolk House 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$218 93 
3,892 41 
1,800 00 
2,003 82 
2,138 77 
20 79 



$10,074 72 
1,000 00 

568 13 



$11,642 85 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies . 
Telephone . . 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Home and office expenses . 
Taxes and water rates 
Interest .... 
Advertising and insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$4,074 44 

275 63 
198 41 
920 27 

3,830 90 
677 13 
797 65 
401 52 
219 60 
153 45 



$11,549 00 
93 85 



$11,642 85 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$49,953.95; value of investments, $43,410.14. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



113 



NORTH BENNET STREET INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, 39 North Bennet St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Quincy A. Shaw, President; Francis W. Hunnewell, 2d, 
Secretary; Russell G. Fessenden, Treasurer; George C. Greener, 
Director. 

Social and educational improvement; research and experiment 
in educational and social methods. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 26. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$706 73 


Salaries and wages . 


$25,058 48 


Subscriptions and donations 


29,935 33 


Equipment 


988 88 


Income from investments . 


475 49 


Provisions and supplies 


4,568 63 


From city of Boston 


4,155 90 


Interest on notes 


500 00 


Day nursery .... 


94 60 


Heat, light and power 


2,246 83 


Department receipts 


5,276 66 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Telephone .... 


30 74 


pairs .... 


954 82 


Rent of cottages 


106 25 


Water 


169 10 


Adjustment of fire loss 


172 62 


Telephone 


353 53 






Social service house, repairs, etc 


240 57 






Total current receipts . 


$40,954 32 


Camp supplies, repairs, etc. 


760 21 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Balance due on loan 


2,200 00 


year 


3,953 15 


Interest on loan 


16 86 






Auditor's services 


65 00 






Insurance premiums 


766 20 






Taxes .... 


216 00 






Alterations on real estate . 
Total current expenses . 


3,390 89 




$42,496 00 






Cash on hand . 


2,411 47 




$44,907 47 


$44,907 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$80,600; value of investments, $16,431.96. 



NORTH END DIET KITCHEN, 8 Staniford PI., Boston. (Incorporated 

1890.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Dr. Malcolm Storer, President; Miss Marion Allen, Secretary; 
Alfred D. Foster, Treasurer; Mrs. Eloise J. Spencer, Matron. 

To provide, free of expense, such diet and food for sick persons 
as may be directed by the physicians of the dispensaries of Bos- 
ton. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 405, viz., 39 paying, 366 partly 
paying. 



114 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 

Legacy 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$989 33 

2,192 85 

1,328 42 

11 50 

$4,522 10 

250 00 

5,000 00 

334 81 



$10,106 91 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Securities purchased 
Cash on hand . 



$537 61 

35 32 

3,822 75 

276 00 

62 84 



3 21 
21 16 


$4,758 89 

4,912 52 

435 50 



$10,106 91 



Value of investments, $33,390. 



NORWEGIAN MISSION HOME, 54 and 56 Cedar St., Roxbury. (Incor- 
porated 1912.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Rev. O. M. Jonswold, President; Mrs. Oscar Levine, Secretary; 
Oscar Levine, Treasurer; Miss Augusta Isacksen, Matron. 

Home for Scandinavian men and women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 323, viz., 295 paying, 3 partly pay- 
ing, 25 free. * 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$2,046 75 

322 06 

4 10 

$2,372 91 
160 95 
107 75 



$2,641 61 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Loans repaid 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Laundry .... 
Interest on mortgage . 
Water rate 
Fire insurance . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$358 60 

1,216 57 

164 25 

187 38 

112 33 
50 83 

382 50 

26 00 

25 00 

3 50 



$2,526 96 
114 65 

$2,641 61 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,500; amount of mortgage on same, $10,311. 



THE NORWEGIAN OLD PEOPLE'S HOME AND CHARITABLE ASSOCIA- 
TION OF GREATER BOSTON. (Incorporated 1915.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Johan B. Sundlie, President; Obert Sletten, Secretary; Ole Aker, 
69 Beacon St., Somerville, Treasurer. 

To furnish relief, and to erect and maintain a home for the 
aged of Norwegian birth or descent. 

Number of families aided, 7. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



115 



Dr. 

Building fund .... $2,754 56 

Relief fund . . . . 23 77 

Income from investments . . 32 12 

Total current receipts . . $2,810 45 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 85 75 



$2,896 20 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Rent . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . . 



$24 45 
25 00 
14 80 

$64 25 
2,831 95 

$2,896 20 



Value of investments, $2,808.18. 

OLIVER DITSON SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF NEEDY MUSICIANS, 
Boston. (Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Arthur Foote, 6 Newbury St., Boston, President; Charles F. 
Smith, Secretary; Arthur R. Smith, Assistant Treasurer. 
Relief of sick, disabled and needy musicians. 
Number aided during year, 30. 



Dr. 
Interest on mortgages and bank 

balance .... $1,557 30 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 39 69 



$1,596 99 



Cr. 



To beneficiaries 
Cash on hand 



. $1,282 00 
314 99 



$1,596 99 



Value of investments, $34,000. 

OVERSEERS OF THE POOR OF THE TOWN OF BOSTON IN THE PROV- 
INCE OF MASSACHUSETTS BAY IN NEW ENGLAND, 43 Hawkins 
St., Boston. (Incorporated 1772.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

William P. Fowler, President and Treasurer; William H. Hardy, 
Secretary. 

Care and distribution of certain trust funds held for various 
charitable purposes. * 

Number aided during year, 252. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 



$29,181 22 



Total current receipts . 




$29,181 22 


Bank stock sold 




15,109 02 


City of Boston notes sold . 




911 25 


Cash on hand at beginning 


of 




year .... 




11,647 04 



$56,848 53 



Cr. 
Provisions, supplies and fuel . $1,030 30 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 99 42 
Pensions and grants . . 27,358 11 



Total current expenses 
For city of Boston notes 
Cash on hand . 



$28,487 83 
14,079 04 
14,281 66 

$56,848 53 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$45,766.32; value of investments, $664,366.32. 



116 STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



PETER BENT BRIGHAM HOSPITAL, 721 Huntington Ave., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles P. Curtis, President; Laurence H. H. Johnson, Secre- 
tary; Edmund D. Codman, Treasurer; Dr. H. B. Howard, Super- 
intendent. 

Hospital for the sick poor in the county of Suffolk. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 285 (including 84 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 225; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 3,417; number of free patients, 1,096; total number 
of hospital days during year, 60,242; number of free days, 23,718; 
total number of visits in out-patient department during year, 
36,523. 

Dr. 

Patients' payments . . $88,651 55 

Interest, dividends and rentals 199,383 97 



Total hospital receipts . $288,035 52 

Donation .... 5,000 00 



$293,035 52 



Cr. 




Administration 


$29,029 09 


Professional care of patients 


98,199 54 


Department expenses 


92,121 43 


General house and property ex- 




penses . 


50,563 40 


Corporation expenses 


1,000 08 


Expenses in care of property . 


8,958 15 


Total hospital expenses 


$279,871 69 


Expenditure from donation 


1,076 29 


Total expenses 


$280,947 98 


Transferred to capital 


6,655 58 


Cash on hand 


5,431 96 



$293,035 52 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1,777,641.41; value of investments, $4,839,962.07. 



PREACHERS' AID SOCIETY OP THE NEW ENGLAND ANNUAL CON- 
FERENCE OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 93 Milk St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1858.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Everett O. Fisk, President; John L. Harvey, Secretary; Arthur 
E. Dennis, Treasurer. 

Caring for worn-out Methodist preachers, their widows and 
children. 

Number of families aided, 87. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



117 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $5,915 03 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 575 48 



Cr. 
To J. M. Leonard, conference 
treasurer .... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$6,490 51 

Value of investments, $141,873.80. 



$6,240 76 

129 75 

$6,370 51 

120 00 

$6,490 51 



ROBERT B. BRIGHAM HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES, Parker Hill Ave., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Joel E. Goldthwait, M.D., President; Samuel A. Merrill, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer; Mary E. L. Thrasher, R.N., Superintendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment of citizens of Boston incapable 
of obtaining a comfortable livelihood by reason of chronic or in- 
curable disease. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 145 (including 20 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 110; total number of hospital patients 
during year, 181; number of free patients, 136; total number of 
hospital days during year, 34,866; number of free days, 34,111. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Estate of R. B. Brigham 
Estate of E. F. Brigham . 

Total receipts 
Sale of investments 
Borrowed .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$2,430 54 
5,119 49 

55,500 00 
3,082 10 

$66,132 13 

4,908 33 

50,000 00 

3,986 43 



$125,026 89 



Cr. 
Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Corporation expenses 
Miscellaneous 

Total expenses 
Construction and equipment 
Cash on hand 



$6,106 50 
32,460 94 
56,203 21 

10,199 29 

4,099 33 

738 52 



$109,807 79 
11,107 87 
4,111 23 

$125,026 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$808,000; value of investments, $183,569.65. 



ROBERT GOULD SHAW HOUSE, INC., 6 Hammond St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Frederick B. Allen, President; Rev. Charles E. Park, 
Secretary; Harold Peabody, Treasurer; Miss M. B. Doolittle, 
Head Worker. 

To promote the social and moral welfare of the negroes of 
Boston. 



118 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 
Number aided during year, about 600. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $3,882 28 

From entertainment . . . 500 00 

Interest 18 74 

Miscellaneous . . . . 42 40 

Total current receipts . . $4,443 42 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 609 55 



$5,052 97 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Rent . 

Heat, light and telephone . 
Clubs, classes and teachers 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,924 39 

49 80 
600 00 
424 50 
333 98 
507 87 

$4,840 54 
212 43 

$5,052 97 



THE ROBERT TREAT PAINE ASSOCIATION, 16 State St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Rev. George L. Paine, President; John H. Storer, Clerk; Robert 
Treat Paine, Treasurer. 

Distributes net income to charitable organizations. 
Number of paid employees, 3. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . 
From sale of land 
From sale of bowling alleys, bill- 
iard and pool tables, etc. . 



$7,851 78 
950 00 

325 00 



$9,126 78 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 




$492 46 


Heat, light and water 




719 30 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs .... 




1,492 86 


Taxes .... 




1,364 40 


Care of real estate 




305 00 


Insurance 




24 65 


Charity gifts 




3,640 00 


Total current expenses 


$8,038 67 


Betterment assessment 




749 87 


Overpaid balance, April 1, 


1915 


264 95 


Cash on hand 




73 29 



$9,126 78 



Value of investments, $103,564.18. 



ROXBURY CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 106 Roxbury St., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1799.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

James DeNormandie, D.D., President; Albert E. Carr, Secretary; 
Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer; Harold K. Estabrook, Gen- 
eral Agent. 

To assist the poor of Roxbury. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 397; number of families aided, 78. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



119 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $433 95 

Income from investments . . 2,978 42 

From trustees of Davis fund . 3,684 79 

Total current receipts . . $7,097 16 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,764 22 



$8,861 38 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Typewriter 
Charity 
Miscellaneous 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$3,506 26 

146 49 
98 50 

243 32 

86 72 

27 22 

70 00 

2,004 75 

256 49 

$6,439 75 

335 02 

2,086 61 



$8,861 38 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$12,775.63; value of investments, $158,926.48. 



ROXBURY FEMALE BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Putnam Chapel, Putnam 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1881.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Henrietta S. Wallis, President; Helen S. Rogers, Secretary; 
Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer. 

To aid needy women of Roxbury with material for sewing and 
in other charitable ways. 

Number aided during year, 31. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Return of loan 
Sales of garments 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$28 00 

419 84 

15 00 

198 49 

$661 33 
40 94 



$702 27 



Cr. 



Materials .... 


. $301 18 


To women's club . 


. 125 00 


For sewing 


. 180 42 


Rent of safe deposit box 


10 00 


Cash to beneficiaries 


74 00 


Miscellaneous 


1 61 


Total current expenses 


. $692 21 


Cash on hand 


10 06 



$702 27 



Value of investments, $9,126.20. 



ROXBURY HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 5 Burton Ave., Roxbury. (In- 
corporated 1856.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Martin L. Cate, President; Miss Mary S. Parker, Secretary; 
Charles L. DeNormandie, Treasurer. 

Home for Protestant American women, natives or long-time 
residents of Roxbury, and not less than sixty-five years of age. 
Admission fee, $300. 



120 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 




Number aided during year: in 


institution, 29; outside institu- 


tion, 3. 








Dr. 




Cr. 




From beneficiaries 


$1,416 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$3,919 77 


Subscriptions and donations 


512 45 


Printing, postage, office supplies 




Income from investments . 


8,513 01 


and advertising 


154 11 


Mortgage reduced 


441 25 


Provisions and supplies 


2,755 18 


Miscellaneous .... 


116 63 


Medical expense 


241 81 






Heat, light and water 


865 84 






Total current receipts . 


$10,999 34 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Legacies ..... 


3,039 40 


pairs .... 


772 66 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Funerals 


337 05 


year 


2,622 93 


Insurance 


208 00 






Outside beneficiaries 


550 36 






Admission fee returned 


300 00 






Interest on bonds 


45 00 






Outside repairs and taxes . 


180 47 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


332 20 




$10,662 45 






Bonds purchased 


4,000 00 






Cash on hand . 


1,999 22 




$16,661 67 


$16,661 67 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,000; value of investments, $180,841.45. 



ROXBURY LADIES' AID AND FUEL SOCIETY, Fauntleroy Hall, Wenonah 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. M. Levin, President; Mrs. L. E. Laskey, Secretary; Mrs. 
H. Frank, Treasurer. 

The immediate relief of destitute Hebrew people. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number aided during year, 1,015. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $163 85 

Dues . . . . . 2,111 20 

From ball .... 2,505 52 

Social activities . . . 1,686 67 

Return on cases . . . 6 00 

Total current receipts . . $6,473 24 

Loans to income . . . 335 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 78 59 



$6,886 83 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Aid and relief 
Rent 

Carriages . 
Coal 

Advertisements 
Flowers to sick members 
Refreshments 
Repaid loans and interest 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$340 40 

215 66 

4,803 35 

74 00 

29 00 

388 87 
33 90 
64 90 
19 70 

339 23 
33 45 



$6,342 46 
544 37 



$6,886 83 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



121 



ROXBURY NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 858 Albany St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Martin L. Cate, President; Mrs. Donald Gregg, Secretary; Albert 
J. Foster, Treasurer; Miss Ethel Ward Dougherty, Head Resident. 

A social and recreational center for the residents of the neigh- 
borhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 24. 

Number using house privileges, 2,085. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$1,098 43 

11,282 04 

154 04 


$12,534 51 
18 89 


$12,553 40 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Furnishings and supplies 
Telephone 
Fuel and light . 
Repairs . 
Taxes 
Camp 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$7,857 69 

152 17 
869 90 
117 36 
1,189 18 
392 88 
145 72 
865 09 
629 04 

$12,219 03 
334 37 

$12,553 40 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$46,300. 



RUFUS P. DAWES HOTEL ASSOCIATION, 8 Pine St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1915.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

Charles G. Dawes, President; William T. Abbott, Secretary; 
Henry M. Dawes, Treasurer; Franklin P. Daly, Manager. 
Lodging house and restaurant for the unemployed. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 
Number aided during year, 62,229. 



Dr. 
Lodgings .... 

Meals 

Rentals of property . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$5,980 74 

1,350 83 

561 07 

$7,892 64 

11,765 68 



$19,658 32 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup^ 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,240 36 

171 81 
2,927 77 
1,419 33 

377 91 

32 77 

$7,169 95 

12,159 10 

329 27 

$19,658 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$120,500. 



122 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



THE RUGGLES STREET NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE, 147 and 155 Ruggles 
St., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Pauline A. Shaw, President; Miss Annie Mansfield Dodd, 
Secretary and Head Worker; Miss Adelene Moffat, Treasurer. 

Clubs and classes for the social and civic welfare of the neigh- 
borhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 19. 

Number aided during year, 431, viz., 408 paying, 23 free. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Refunds . 



$148 71 

7,110 74 

423 74 



$7,683 19 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $6,042 90 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 126 70 

Provisions and supplies . . 75 85 

Heat, light and power . . 408 54 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 113 17 

Car fares 58 40 

Telephone . . . . 104 74 

Boston Social Union fees and taxes 49 50 

Camp, outings, playground and 

gardens .... 289 38 

Classes, clubs and entertainments 414 01 

$7,683 19 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$13,300. 



ST. ELIZABETH'S HOSPITAL OP BOSTON, 736 Cambridge St., Brighton. 

(Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President and Treasurer; 
John J. Attridge, Secretary; Dr. John R. Slattery, Superintendent. 

To care for the sick, without regard to age, sex, color, nation- 
ality, creed or residence (excluding contagious, acute venereal and 
mental diseases). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 135 (including 57 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of beds, 190. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 2,115; number 
of free patients, 394; total number of hospital days during year, 
38,133; number of free days, 9,004; total number of visits in out- 
patient department during year, 8,665. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



123 



Dr. 



$100,901 07 



Cr. 



Patients' payments 




$81,102 50 


Administration 


$4,320 00 


Payments by city, town 


or 




Professional care of patients 


18,274 79 


State 




521 14 


Department expenses 


31,753 75 


Voluntary contributions . 




3,272 39 


General house and property ex- 




Interest, dividends and rentals 


663 36 


penses .... 


26,194 52 


Unrestricted legacies 




937 40 


Miscellaneous 


1,338 93 


Miscellaneous 




246 00 














Total hospital expenses 


$81,881 99 






Total hospital receipts 




$86,742 79 


Cash on hand at end of year . 


19,019 08 


Dispensary receipts 




5,892 58 






Total receipts 


$92,635 37 




Cash on hand at beginning 


of 








year .... 




8,265 70 







$100,901 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$237,500; amount of mortgage on same, $25,481.14; value of in- 
vestments, $109,653.24. 



ST. JOSEPH'S HOME, 43 East Brookline St., Boston. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President and Treasurer; 
Right Rev. Mgr. J. P. E. O'Connell, Secretary; Sister Mary Boni- 
face, Superior. 

Home for unemployed women and immigrant girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 43, viz., 34 paying, 
5 partly paying, 4 free; outside institution, 1,825. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Interest . 



$7,894 75 

595 49 

45 38 



Total current receipts . . $8,535 62 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 368 20 



$8,903 82 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,392 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 22 62 

Provisions and supplies . . 5,348 81 
Heat, light and power . . 536 97 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 494 01 

Miscellaneous . . . . 99 95 

Total current expenses . . $7,894 36 

Cash on hand .... 1,009 46 



$8,903 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$23,000. 



124 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ST. LUKE'S HOME FOR CONVALESCENTS, 149 Roxbury St., Roxbury. 

(Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending October 17, 1916. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, President; Charles E. Mason, Sec- 
retary; William H. Aspinwall, Treasurer; Miss H. O. Coombs, 
Matron. 

A convalescent home for women, without distinction as to age, 
creed or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 283, viz., 72 paying, 
18 partly paying, 193 free; outside institution, 18. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$516 19 


Salaries and wages . 


$4,559 93 


Subscriptions and donations 


6,027 31 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Income from investments . 


7,446 18 


plies .... 


159 47 


Commonwealth of Massachu- 




Provisions and supplies 


3,420 60 


setts, rebate national bank tax 


14 75 


Heat, light and power 


999 95 


Miscellaneous . . . . 


58 24 


Furnishings and incidental re- 








pairs .... 


401 48 






Total current receipts 


$14,062 67 


Improvements 


215 00 


Transferred from principal 


1,635 47 


Outside relief . 

Christmas and Thanksgiving 


1,524 10 






donations 


35 00 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


1,011 04 




$12,326 57 






Income overdrawn, October 








1915 .... 


1,635 47 






Cash on hand . 


1,736 10 




$15,698 14 


$15,698 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$27,819.50; value of investments, $179,548.41. 



ST. MARY'S INFANT ASYLUM AND LYING-IN HOSPITAL, Cushing 
Ave. and Jerome St., Dorchester. (Incorporated 1874.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Patrick F. 
McDonald, Secretary; Edward J. O'Neil, Treasurer; Sister Veron- 
ica, Sister Superior. 

The care of homeless and neglected children under three years 
of age, and for all the purposes of a lying-in hospital. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27 (including 12 pupil 
nurses). 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 222; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
148; in part, 74; monthly average number of children under 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



125 



supervision in foster homes, 100; number of placing-out visitors, 
1; total number of beds in St. Margaret's Hospital, 50; total 
number of hospital patients during year, 789. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $52,664 74 
Subscriptions, donations and en- 
tertainments . . . 17,658 29 
Annuities and bequests to income 3,179 39 
Interest 42 82 



Total current receipts . . $73,545 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,929 



24 



$76,474 93 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
For board of children 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$8,272 37 

492 54 

29,533 42 

446 00 

5,769 16 

9,407 64 

11,791 17 

2,216 13 

$67,928 43 
8,546 50 

$76,474 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$127,800; amount of mortgage on same, $15,000. 



ST. STEPHEN'S SETTLEMENT, TRUSTEES OF, 70 State St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1905.) 

Eeport for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Harry Burnett, President; Thomas P. Beal, Jr., Secretary; 
George L. Benedict, Treasurer; Miss H. T. Johnson, Superintend- 
ent of Welcome House, 9 Florence St. 

To hold title to real estate and funds for the benefit of mission 
work carried on by St. Stephen's Church on Florence St., Boston. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . 
Receipts of Welcome House 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year (Welcome House) . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year .... 



$1,212 76 
8,014 85 

$9,227 61 

1,006 54 

618 82 



$10,852 97 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$2,671 80 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


200 82 


Provisions and supplies 


2,509 55 


Insurance 


62 33 


Heat, light and power 


860 22 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


783 01 


Medical expenses 


393 97 


Telephone 


164 33 


Water rates 


78 00 


House expenses 


301 05 


Miscellaneous . 


563 36 


Total current expenses . 


$8,588 44 


Cash on hand . 


2,264 53 




$10,852 97 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$31,431.94; value of investments, $19,418.65. 



126 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ST. VINCENT'S ORPHAN ASYLUM, 52 Camden St. , Boston. (Incorporated 

1834.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Thomas F. Har- 
rington, M.D., Secretary; William E. Cunningham, Treasurer; 
Sister Superior Madeline, Superintendent. 

Care of orphan girls, three to fourteen years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 255, viz., 42 paying, 50 partly 
paying, 75 free, 88 placed with families or relatives. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Board of children 
Bazaar .... 
Interest .... 
Refund .... 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning o: 
year .... 



$279 39 


3,026 25 


6,649 65 


3,458 73 


319 39 


6 25 


$13,739 66 


8,810 77 


$22,550 43 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Religious 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,797 00 
7,536 16 
1,607 07 

1,002 02 

1,050 00 

695 99 



$13,688 24 
8,862 19 

$22,550 43 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$112,000. 



SALVATION ARMY OP MASSACHUSETTS, INC., 8 East Brookline St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Commander Evangeline Booth, President; Maj. Burleigh I. 
Hillman, Secretary; Col. Adam GifTord, Treasurer. 

To benefit the poor by relieving their bodies from disease and 
suffering, bringing their minds and hearts under the influence of 
education and the Christian religion, and assisting them to estab- 
lish themselves in life. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 70. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 202,906, viz., 86,947 
paying, 51 partly paying, 115,908 free; outside institution, 50,484, 
all free; number of families aided, 6,429. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



127 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $64,380 50 

Subscriptions and donations . 37,594 86 

Annuities and bequests to in- 
come 5,689 95 

Income from investments . 557 29 

Percentages from corps for over- 
sight 17,913 24 



Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 



. $126,135 84 
10,528 82 



i $136,664 66 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies . 

Rent, taxes, interest and insur 
ance .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Traveling, expressage, freight 
etc. .... 

Grants to poor corps and needy 
officers 

Grants to beneficiaries 

General and oversight expenses 



$24,064 57 


17,544 76 
29,659 71 


20,180 40 
2,953 52 


6,888 59 


8,080 04 


7,972 43 
9,224 92 
10,095 72 


1 $136,664 66 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$563,379.68; amount of mortgage on same, $346,350; value of 
investments, $23,286. 



SCOTS' CHARITABLE SOCIETY, 114 State St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1786.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Robert E. May, President; Stewart W. Millar, Secretary; John 
N. Jordan, Treasurer. 

To furnish relief to Scotsmen, their immediate descendants and 
families, and to give them information and advice. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 2,106; number of families aided, 
280. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Membership fees 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$251 17 

2,469 02 

473 00 

149 34 

$3,342 53 
725 25 



$4,067 78 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Telephone 

Rent .... 

Light .... 

Meals and lodgings 
Cash aid, groceries, coal, clothing 
Rents .... 
Fares .... 

Funeral expenses 
Temporary aid . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$105 00 

212 57 

35 01 

312 76 

6 75 

115 35 

2,043 55 

514 15 

229 45 

111 00 

77 65 

42 50 



$3,805 74 
262 04 

$4,067 78 



Value of investments, $50,085. 



1 The corporation's return divides the year's budget as follows: For religious purposes: re- 
ceived, $36,254.52; expended, $37,488.65. For charitable purposes: received, $89,881.32; expended, 
$99,176.01. 



128 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SEARS AND OTHER FUNDS, TRUSTEES OF, Boston. (Incorporated 

1912.) 

Report for year ending February 28, 1916. 

Howard Stockton, 50 State St., Boston, President; W. Rodman 
Fay, Secretary; George H. Richards, Treasurer. 

To hold and manage trust funds for charitable purposes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 2 families, a cathedral and a mis- 
sion. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $22,186 84 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 21 32 



$22,208 16 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $500 00 

Interest 1,920 00 

Taxes .... . 2,320 20 

Beneficiaries . . . . 13,457 96 

Safe rent . . . . 10 00 



Total current expenses 
Transfer to capital . 



$18,208 16 
4,000 00 

$22,208 16 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,100 (part of a building); amount of mortgage on whole 
building and land, $48,000; value of investments, $256,057.44. 



SHAW ASYLUM FOR MARINERS' CHILDREN, 87 Milk St., Boston. 

(Incorporated 1877.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Robert G. Shaw, President; Hollis H. Shaw, Clerk and Treas- 
urer; Miss Abbie Nichols, Superintendent. 

Aid to children and widows of mariners. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 462; number of children cared for 
in foster homes, 3; monthly average number of children under 
supervision, 289. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




Income from investments . 


. $25,741 01 


Salaries and wages . 


$2,460 00 


Cash on hand at beginning 


of 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




year .... 


. 12,920 39 


plies ..... 


77 59 






Rent ..... 


150 00 






Outside aid .... 


12,230 50 






Widows' aid .... 


8,205 50 






Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


323 50 




$23,447 09 






Income invested 


5,575 00 






Cash on hand .... 


9,639 31 




$38,661 40 


$38,661 40 



Value of investments, $553,800. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



129 



SOCIETY FOR HELPING DESTITUTE MOTHERS AND INFANTS, 276 
Tremont St., Boston. (Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Ada E. Sheffield, President; Miss Lilian Freeman Clarke, 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise Adele Greene, Treasurer; Miss E. M. 
Locke, Agent. 

To aid destitute mothers and infants. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 378. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $4,152 00 

Income from investments . . 442 60 

Miscellaneous . . . . 233 43 

Total current receipts . . $4,828 03 

Loans to income . . . 894 90 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,024 20 



$6,747 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Provisions and supplies . * . 

Rent 

Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$3,848 29 

301 28 

1,029 99 

200 00 

382 36 

$5,761 92 
985 21 

$6,747 13 



Value of investments, $7,150. 

This corporation has changed its year to end October 31. 
Consequently, its financial statement for the ten months closing 
October 31, 1916, is available for publication this year. It is as 
follows: — 

Report for ten months ending October 31, 1916. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 
Number aided during 10 months, 310. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $396 94 

Subscriptions and donations . 3,940 00 

Income from investments . . 404 45 



Total current receipts . . $4,741 39 

Loans to income . . . 979 35 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 985 21 



$6,705 95 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Traveling expenses 
Telephone 

Returned on account of loan 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$3,688 75 

258 04 

1,101 20 

600 00 

36 37 
160 19 
172 56 
200 00 

97 60 

$6,314 71 
391 24 

$6,705 95 



Value of investments, $7,541.24. 



130 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SOCIETY FOR MINISTERIAL RELIEF, 25 Beacon St., Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1850.) 

Report for year ending May 2, 1916. 

Rev. James DeNormandie, President; Rev. Henry W. Foote, 
Secretary; Stephen W. Phillips, Treasurer. 

Relief of Unitarian clergymen who are in necessitous circum- 
stances. 

Number aided during year, 33. 



Dr. 
Income from investments . . $11,392 44 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 5,414 72 



$16,807 16 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Donations to beneficiaries 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$33 55 
11,150 00 

$11,183 55 

574 44 

5,049 17 

$16,807 16 



Value of investments, $216,149.10. 

SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF AGED OR DISABLED EPISCOPAL 
CLERGYMEN, 1 Joy St., Boston. (Incorporated 1846.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, President; Rev. Prescott Evarts, 
Secretary; George P. Gardner, Treasurer. 

For the relief of aged or disabled Episcopal clergymen. 
Number aided during year, 8. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Trustees of donations 



$567 35 
4,844 47 
1,697 98 



$7,109 80 



Cr. 
Paid to beneficiaries . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 



$2,730 37 
15 00 

$2,745 37 
4,364 43 

$7,109 80 



Value of investments, $114,000. 



SOCIETY FOR THE RELIEF OF THE WIDOWS AND ORPHANS OF 
CLERGYMEN OF THE PROTESTANT EPISCOPAL CHURCH, 50 

Congress St., Boston. (Incorporated 1841.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1916. 

Rt. Rev. William Lawrence, President; Rev. Reuben Kidner, 
Secretary; Russell S. Codman, Treasurer. 

For the relief of widows and orphans of clergymen of the Prot- 
estant Episcopal Church in Massachusetts. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



131 



Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 73. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 



year 



$1,841 


97 


9,076 


26 


$10,918 23 


1,188 


57 


$12,106 80 



Or. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Appropriations 
Beneficiaries . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$75 00 

65 65 

5,141 69 

675 00 

137 50 



$9,094 84 
3,011 96 

$12,106 80 



Value of investments, $208,481.47. 



SOCIETY OP ST. MARGARET (St. Monica's Home), 125 Highland St., 
Roxbury. (Incorporated 1882.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

George O. G. Coale, President; Paul M. Hubbard, Secretary; 
Sister Vera Margaret, Treasurer and Sister in Charge. 

For the care and treatment of sick colored women and children, 
including a tuberculosis ward of ten to twelve beds. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number of beds, 54. 

Number aided during year, 59, viz., 41 partly paying, 18 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board from patients . 
Receipts from industries 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts . . $8,859 91 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 289 80 



. $3,311 


84 


246 


61 


. 4,452 


52 


821 


44 


27 


50 



$9,149 71 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$2,785 86 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


76 62 


Provisions and supplies 


2,954 86 


Rent and alterations . 


343 15 


Heat and light . 


750 31 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


357 43 


Drugs and hospital supplies 


149 99 


Express, telephone, insurance 




water tax and interest 


469 30 


Expenses for industries 


295 81 


Miscellaneous . 


456 36 


Total current expenses 


$8,639 69 


Cash on hand . 


510 02 




$9,149 71 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$13,966.14; amount of mortgage on same, $2,600; value of invest- 
ments, $5,209. 



132 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17, 



SOUTH BOSTON LITHUANIAN BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, 309 E St., South 
Boston. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

George Dragoskis, President; Stanley Mockus, Secretary; Con- 
stantine Yurgelun, Treasurer. 

A center for the Lithuanians of South Boston and vicinity; to 
assist those who are worthy to obtain an education, and to aid 
those in distress. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 



Dr. 



Rents 

From members 

Entertainments 



$3,179 05 
21 00 

864 83 



Total current receipts . . $4,064 88 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 756 42 



$4,821 30 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$980 37 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


17 00 


Heat, light and power 


418 75 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


722 69 


Taxes, interest and insurance 


958 16 


Notes and loans 


1,050 00 


Charitable purposes . 


210 00 


Miscellaneous .... 


8 50 


Total current expenses 


$4,365 47 


Cash on hand . .'■'■•. 


455 83 




$4,821 30 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$24,677.23; amount of mortgage on same, $11,000. 



SOUTH BOSTON NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSE (formerly South Boston Day 
Nursery), 521 East Seventh St., South Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Ellerton James, President and Treasurer; Mrs. Edward C. 
Williams, Secretary; Mrs. C. E. Somes, Matron. 

Day nursery for children under five years of age whose mothers 
are obliged to work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2 to 3. 

Number aided during year, about 300, all partly paying; num- 
ber of families aided, 120. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $188 98 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,153 97 

Total current receipts . . $1,342 95 

Loans to income . . . 38 98 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 386 86 



$1,768 79 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Water and insurance . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income carried to capital 



$656 75 

9 00 
508 82 

79 50 
132 57 

42 25 

$1,428 89 
339 90 

$1,768 79 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



133 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,000. 

SOUTH BOSTON SAMARITAN SOCIETY, South Boston. (Incorporated 

1840.) 

Report for year ending November 7, 1916. 

Mrs. Elizabeth P. Holbrook, President; Miss Myra Mitchell, 
Secretary; Mrs. Sarah C. Harrington, 28 Mason Ter., Brookline, 
Treasurer. 

To assist the worthy Protestant poor of South Boston, regard- 
less of age, sex, color, etc. 

Number aided during year, 40. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 



$8 50 
40 40 



Total current receipts . . $48 90 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4 10 



$53 00 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office supplies 
Provisions and supplies . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$1 00 
49 00 

$50 00 
3 00 

$53 00 



Value of investments, $2,000. 

SOUTH END DAY NURSERY, 25 Dover St., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Harriet Minot Laughlin, President; Miss Elizabeth H. 
Flint, Secretary; Lincoln Bryant, Treasurer; Mrs. Annie M. 
Chaffe, Matron. 

To help needy mothers, who from necessity are wage-earners, 
by caring for their children during working hours. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 193; number of days' care, 16,480. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 
Deficit . . 



$1,066 82 
2,476 00 
1,555 73 


$5,098 55 
132 65 

10 85 


$5,242 05 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,548 73 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 39 76 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,343 39 

Heat, light and power . . 251 08 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 528 03 

Mortgage interest . . . 180 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 351 06 

$5,242 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
900; amount of mortgage on same, $4,000; value of invest- 
ments, $31,630.02. 



134 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SOUTH END DAY NURSERY AUXILIARY, 25 Dover St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1903.) 

Report for year ending May 23, 1916. 

Loretta Joy Cummins, M.D., President; Mrs. Frank H. I vers, 
Secretary; Mrs. George A. Chapman, Treasurer. 

To assist the South End Day Nursery by paying mortgage and 
interest and helping with running expenses. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $92 00 

Interest 36 95 

From fair 1,033 08 

From ball . . . 119 66 



Total current receipts . . $1,281 69 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,217 36 



$3,499 05 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Furnishings and incidental re- 



Interest on mortgage 
Summer outings 
Running expenses 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$50 54 
77 07 

145 00 
180 00 
200 00 
800 00 
6 80 

$1,459 41 
2,039 64 

$3,499 05 



SOUTH END DIET KITCHEN, 21 Common St., Boston. 

1882.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. I. Tucker Burr, President; Miss Mary St. 
retary; Mrs. R. M. Saltonstall, Treasurer; Mrs. 
Superintendent. 

To furnish diets to the sick poor. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 9,070. 



(Incorporated 



B. Eustis, Sec- 
A. C. Wilder, 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Used from principal . 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$282 67 

2,032 00 

2,466 75 

20 02 


$4,801 44 
193 55 
142 91 


$5,137 90 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . 

Miscellaneous 



$818 25 

13 75 
3,931 04 

300 00 

14 56 

1 15 
59 15 

$5,137 90 



Value of investments, $49,728.98. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



135 



THE SOUTH END HOUSE ASSOCIATION, 20 Union Pk„ Boston. (In- 
corporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. George Hodges, President; William I. Cole, Secretary; 
James A. Lowell, Treasurer; Robert A. Woods, Head of the House. 

For the improvement of the conditions of life and labor in a 
tenement and lodging-house district by providing opportunities 
for industrial and domestic training and for healthful, social inter- 
course. Co-operates with relief-giving agencies. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 25. 

Number aided during year, 2,000, viz., 1,000 partly paying, 
1,000 free; families aided, 500. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From residents for board and 
room ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$491 65 

20,260 01 

1,057 50 

7,608 92 
1,732 67 


$31,150 75 
10,000 00 

1,571 28 


$42,722 03 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$17,673 45 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


544 26 


Provisions and supplies 


5,393 75 


Rent .... 


420 00 


Heat, light and power 


1,887 89 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


703 24 


Interest and insurance 


2,313 36 


Special instruction . 


607 70 


Summer work . 


1,508 75 


Miscellaneous . 


4,590 92 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$35,643 32 
4,899 02 
2,179 69 

$42,722 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$72,000; amount of mortgage on same, $31,500; value of invest- 
ments, $25,620.75. 



SOUTH END MUSIC SCHOOL, 32 Rutland St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1912.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Arthur Foote, President; Annie Endicott Nourse, Secretary; 
Mrs. Estelle H. Mason, Treasurer; Mrs. Catherine E. Saunders, 
Matron. 

To provide musical instruction and to assist in the musical 
education of the public. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 36. 

Number aided during year, 300, viz., 299 partly paying, 1 free. 



136 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Entertainments 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$2,995 48 
1,847 00 

10,000 00 
2,273 39 

$17,115 87 

100 04 



$17,215 91 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$5,464 94 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


59 00 


Heat, light and power 


436 96 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


84 86 


Interest on mortgages 


925 00 


Telephone 


98 81 


Insurance 


6 40 


Music and supplies . 


575 12 


Miscellaneous . 


222 57 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Mortgage 
Cash on hand . 



$7,873 66 


7,000 00 


2,000 00 


342 25 



$17,215 91 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$32,000; mortgage on same, $17,000; value of investments, $8,000. 



STUDENTS' HOUSE CORPORATION, 96 The Fenway, Boston. (Incor- 
porated 1914.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary S. Holmes, President; Miss Mary E. Libbey, Secre- 
tary and House Mother; Edward J. Holmes, Treasurer. 

To provide a home and otherwise benefit young women en- 
gaged in the study or teaching of any branch of art, science or 
higher education. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number aided during year, 97, viz., 79 paying, 16 partly pay- 
ing, 2 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $25,158 39 

Subscriptions and donations . 232 50 

Interest 93 55 

Miscellaneous . . . . 19 06 

Total current receipts . . $25,503 50 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,172 07 



$27,675 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs . 
Laundry 
Telephone 
Water tax 
Insurance 

Interest on mortgage 
Interest on notes 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Payment on note 
Cash on hand . 



$5,670 50 
9,785 96 
2,477 42 

1,297 66 

167 31 

131 79 

284 40 

52 89 

2,750 00 

1,350 00 

197 07 



$24,165 00 
1,000 00 
2,510 57 

$27,675 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$69,600; amount of mortgage on same, $55,000. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



137 



SUNNYSIDE DAY NURSERY, 16 Hancock St., Boston. (Incorporated 

1902.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Miss Frances C. Sturgis, President; Mrs. Henry P. King, Secre- 
tary; I. McD. Garfield, Treasurer; Mrs. S. E. Hines, Matron. 

To furnish a day nursery for the care of young children of 
working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 82, all paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Special contributions . 
Proceeds of garden lecture . 
Miscellaneous . 



$387 98 

2,684 54 

641 37 

270 06 

626 00 

26 00 



Total current receipts . . $4,635 95 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 675 10 



$5,311 05 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $2,025 72 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


61 25 


Provisions and supplies 


978 63 


Interest and insurance 


420 90 


Heat, light and water 


366 86 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


482 37 


Laundry .... 


242 26 


Sewing, dancing and sloyd . 


147 97 


Hot-water heater 


96 31 


Dentistry work 


19 20 


Miscellaneous . 


93 37 


Total current expenses . 


. $4,934 84 


Cash on hand . 


376 21 




$5,311 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$21,674.11; amount of mortgage on same, -$9,000; value of invest- 
ments, $14,225.62. 



SWEDISH CHARITABLE SOCIETY OF GREATER BOSTON, Boston. 

(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

George Nelson, 904 Tremont Building, Boston, President; Sig- 
frid Wetterling, Secretary; Anton Hedin, Treasurer. 

To furnish relief, advice and assistance to persons of Swedish 
descent and their families; also to erect and support a home for 
aged and incapacitated Swedish people. 

Number aided during year, 22; number of families aided, 30. 



138 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Annuities and bequests to income 

Interest 

From ball 

From bazaar 

From field day 

From concert 



$211 01 

92 00 

364 76 

54 15 

3,996 13 

39 80 

132 21 



Total current receipts . . $4,890 06 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 331 92 



$5,221 98 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Rent 
Bond 
Donations 
Expressage 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$63 36 

5 00 

2 50 

402 70 

11 30 

10 08 

$494 94 

4,400 69 

326 35 

$5,221 98 



Value of investments, $11,664.42. 



SWEDISH HOME OF PEACE ("FRIDHEM"), 169 Townsend St., Roxbury. 

(Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Gustaf F. Sodergren, President; C. V. Bowman, Secretary; John 
A. Danielson, Treasurer; Miss Ebba Ruhnborg, Matron. 

Home for Scandinavian working girls out of employment or in 
need of rest. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 332, viz., 322 pay- 
ing, 5 partly paying, 5 free; outside institution, 4. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $3,314 80 

Subscriptions and donations . 537 67 

Annuities and bequests to income 100 00 



Total current receipts . . $3,952 47 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 103 67 



$4,056 14 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $758 00 
Provisions and supplies . . 1,955 97 
Heat, light, power and telephone 303 44 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 65 28 

Taxes 204 80 

Interest and insurance . . 434 61 

Miscellaneous . . . . 66 42 

Total current expenses . . $3,788 52 

Cash on hand . . . 267 62 

$4,056 14 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$11,000; mortgage on same, $8,000. 



SWISS BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Boston. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

William Conza, President; Mrs. Emma Schuerch, Secretary; 
Mrs. Elizabeth C. Fischer, 48 Weld Hill St., Forest Hills, Treas- 
urer; Conrad Schuerch, Agent. 

Advice and financial assistance to Swiss citizens or their de- 
scendants. 

Number aided during year, 10. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



139 



Dr. 



Dues 
Interest 



$98 50 
74 48 



Total current receipts . . $172 98 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,907 88 



$2,080 86 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Aid given ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$14 60 

113 05 

9 85 

$137 50 
1,943 36 

$2,080 86 



TEMPORARY HOME FOR WORKING WOMEN, 453 Shawmut Ave., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1878.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Henry R. Dalton, President;. Miss Laura Revere Little, 
Secretary; Richard C. Storey, Treasurer; Mrs. Maude A. Edson, 
Superintendent. 

Temporary home and aid for unemployed working women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 416, viz., 147 paying, 
269 free; outside institution, 5; number of families aided, 1. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $85 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,655 00 

Income from investments . . 2,095 06 

Miscellaneous .... 3,818 88 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$8,653 94 
1,373 13 



$10,027 07 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$3,194 78 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


89 49 


Provisions and supplies 


2,079 44 


Heat, light and power 


593 44 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs 


755 77 


Laundry .... 


123 72 


Laundry hire .... 


590 80 


Room rent .... 


169 25 


Miscellaneous .... 


736 11 


Total current expenses . 


$8,332 80 


Cash on hand .... 


1,694 27 




$10,027 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$15,000; value of investments, $63,583.50. 



TRINITY CHURCH HOME FOR THE AGED (RACHEL ALLEN MEMO- 
RIAL), 135 South Huntington Ave., Boston. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Rev. Alexander Mann, D.D., President; Mrs. Percival H. Lom- 
bard, Secretary; Mrs. Gertrude F. Thomas, Treasurer; Miss Annie 
E. Jarvis, Matron. 

Boarding home for aged women of the church. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 24; outside institu- 
tion, 50. 



140 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $5,489 96 

Subscriptions and donations . 4,019 00 

Income from investments . . 1,277 94 

Miscellaneous .... 126 60 

Total current receipts . . $10,913 50 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,696 67 



$12,610 17 ) 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,461 34 
4,284 05 
1,144 45 

1,384 51 
1,163 25 

$11,437 60 
1,172 57 

$12,610 17 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$36,700; amount of mortgage on same, $5,000; value of invest- 
ments, $26,293.75. 



UNION BELGE, 166 Devonshire St., Boston. (Incorporated 1915.) 

Report for fourteen months ending December 31, 1915. 

Theodore Van Wambeke, President; J. J. Emile De Bie, Secre- 
tary, Edward Totte, Treasurer. 

A Belgian headquarters in Boston to attend to the interests of 
Belgians in New England. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 



$5,435 11 



$5,435 11 



Cr. 
Wages .... 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Rent .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
New England Belgian relief 
Cash on hand . 



$268 72 

47 99 

28 00 

104 02 

$448 73 

4,394 53 

591 85 

$5,435 11 



UNION RESCUE MISSION, 64A Dover St., Boston. (Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Frank F. Davidson, President; Clarke W. Morehouse, Secre- 
tary; Nathan W. Dennett, Treasurer; P. E. Call, Superintendent. 

The rescue of lost men and women and the reconstruction of 
broken lives. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 14,271. 



Part III 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



141 



Dr. 

Annuities and bequests to income $8,321 61 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 90 21 



$8,411 82 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent . . . 

Heat, light and power 
Temporary aid . 
Lodgings . 
Ice water . 
Note 

Advertising 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,775 46 

829 87 
134 86 
898 00 
289 00 
782 57 
134 17 

58 37 
600 00 

81 10 
634 46 

$8,217 86 
193 96 

$8,411 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$15,200; amount of mortgage on same, $9,000. 



VINCENT MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, 125 South Huntington Ave., Boston. 
(Incorporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending March 1, 1916. 

George H. Davenport, President; Rev. Reuben Kidner, Secre- 
tary; Charles H. Parker, Treasurer; Miss Jean C. Fraser, Super- 
intendent. 

Hospital care for poor women and girls over twelve years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Total number of beds, 24. 

"Total number of hospital patients during year, 222; number of 
free patients, 81; total number of hospital days during year, 
4,900; number of free days, 2,395. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 
Received from investments 
Attendants .... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$7,645 42 


3,179 82 


10 90 


5,700 00 


349 50 


6 55 


$16,892 19 


293 23 


$17,185 42 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Food .... 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Gas and electricity . 
Coal and wood . . 

Hospital supplies 
General expenses 

Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$7,604 05 

4,319 65 

1,543 17 

532 64 

935 81 

927 09 

651 88 

$16,514 29 

671 13 

$17,185 42 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$75,628.52; amount of mortgage on same, $8,000; value of in- 
vestments, $167,723.60. 



142 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



WASHINGTONIAN HOME, 41 Waltham St., Boston. (Incorporated 1859.) 

Report for year ending April 25, 1916. 

George Holden Tinkham, President; George B. Stebbins, Clerk; 
Henry W. Hart, Treasurer; Dr. Hugh B. Gray, Superintendent. 
Treatment and care of male inebriates. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 
Number aided during year, 1,061 viz., 1,049, paying, 12 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $11,709 00 

Income from investments . . 4,197 22 

E. V. Ashton fund . . . 2,000 00 

Total current receipts . . $17,906 22 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 7,457 50 



$25,363 72 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Ice ..... 
Drugs and medicines 
Advertising 
Telephone 

Water .... 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$5,454 53 

183 59 

5,799 19 

1,579 42 

3,222 51 

159 80 

307 90 

16 05 

150 34 

84 50 

62 03 

409 20 

$17,429 06 

7,934 66 

$25,363 72 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$61,000; value of investments, $100,000. 



THE WIDOWS' SOCIETY IN BOSTON, Boston. (Incorporated 1828.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Miss Anna T. Reynolds, President; Mrs. William C. Loring, 
Secretary; Henry S. Hunnewell, 87 Milk St., Boston, Treasurer. 

To visit and aid widows and unmarried women over sixty 
years of age. 

Number aided during year, 139, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $5,186 00 

Income from investments . . 8,812 93 

Total current receipts . . $13,998 93 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,829 74 



$16,828 67 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies $211 82 

Paid to widows . . . 14,259 27 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$14,471 09 
2,357 58 

$16,828 67 



Value of investments, $238,271.82. 



Part IL] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



143 



WINCHESTER HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 10 Eden St., Charlestown. 

(Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Walter S. Glidden, President; Leslie Langill, Secretary; William 
P. Hart, Treasurer; Mrs. Cora A. Roberts, Matron. 

Home for women over sixty years of age, of American parent- 
age, residents of Charlestown for ten years. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 43. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$837 50 

1,705 33 

7,526 19 

70 12 

$10,139 14 
604 25 

2,944 63 



$13,688 02 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 




$3,440 45 


Printing, postage and office 


3up- 




plies .... 




115 88 


Provisions and supplies 




3,967 16 


Heat, light and power 




1,201 91 


Furnishings and incidental 


re- 




pairs .... 




1,295 79 


Insurance 




119 15 


Fiftieth anniversary 




846 50 


Doctors, druggist and under- 




takers . . . . 




699 16 


Interest .... 




122 50 


Miscellaneous . 




1,101 97 


Total current expenses . 


$12,910 47 


Cash on hand . 




777 55 




$13,688 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $182,691.34. 



WOMAN'S AUXILIARY OF THE NEW ENGLAND BAPTIST HOSPITAL, 
Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Carrie N. Walsh, President; Mrs. Mary L. Colton, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Margaret T. Blanchard, Treasurer. 

To aid in the work of the New England Baptist Hospital. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $339 00 
Bag sale 281 51 



Total current receipts . . $620 51 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 163 79 



$784 30 



Cr. 

Printing and postage . 
Free bed 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$20 55 

250 00 

56 20 

$326 75 
457 55 

$784 30 



144 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



WOMAN'S CHARITY CLUB, Parker Hill Ave., Roxbury. (Incorporated 

1889.) 

Report for year ending April 17, 1916. 

Mrs. Elizabeth W. Otis, President; Mrs. Lydia R. Tallman, 
Secretary; Mrs. Martha G. James, Treasurer. 

To assist in maintaining the Massachusetts Woman's Hospital 
(formerly Woman's Charity Club Hospital). 



Dr. 
From club committees 
Club dues 
Hospital . 

Junior Charity Club . 
Miscellaneous . 



$2,177 86 

615 50 

800 00 

375 00 

59 67 



Total current receipts . . $4,028 03 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 873 28 



$4,901 31 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Rent 

Fire escapes on hospital 
State federation tax . 
City federation dues . 
To hospital 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$131 83 

108 00 

887 00 

18 00 

3 00 

2,800 00 

21 97 

$3,969 80 
931 51 

$4,901 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$36,600. 



WOMAN'S SEAMAN'S FRIEND SOCIETY, 14 Beacon St., Boston. (In- 
corporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. H. D. Heathfield, President; Mrs. Henry Delano, Clerk; 
Mrs. Josephine B. White, Treasurer. 

To provide necessary clothing for the sailor and work for his 
general welfare, in connection with and as auxiliary to the Bos- 
ton Seaman's Friend Society. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $931 77 

Annuities and bequests to income 20 00 

Income from investments . . 523 08 

Miscellaneous .... 163 77 

Total current receipts . . $1,638 62 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 322 04 



$1,960 66 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 
Socials 

Services at Navy Yard 
Expense of "Sea Breeze" 
Work at Vineyard Haven 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$198 31 
552 96 

87 69 
209 68 
369 40 
100 00 

93 10 
179 46 

$1,790 60 
170 06 

$1,960 66 



Value of investments, $6,879.17. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



145 



WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL UNION, 264 Boylston St., 
Boston. (Incorporated 1880.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Mary Morton Kehew, Acting President; Mrs. Mabel W. 
Whidden, Secretary; Mrs. Helen Peirce, Treasurer. 

To promote the educational, industrial and social advancement 
of Women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 300 to 325. 

Number receiving legal aid during year, 411. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
From departments . 
Miscellaneous 



$16,937 04 

912 25 

516,633 36 

1,472 87 



$535,955 52 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Rent .... 
Heat, light and power 
General operating expenses 

Total current expenses 
Applied against deficit 



$182,672 04 

12,291 74 

8,019 71 

329,103 72 

$532,087 21 
3,868 31 

$535,955 52 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$315,000; amount of mortgage, $68,00*0; value of investments, 
$42,530. 

WOMEN'S EDUCATIONAL AND INDUSTRIAL UNION, TRUSTEES OF, 
Boston. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Henry Lefavour, LL.D., President; George U. Crocker, 50 Con- 
gress St., Boston, Secretary and Treasurer. 

To increase fellowship among women, in order to promote the 
best practical methods of securing their educational, industrial 
and social advancement, and to that end to hold, manage, a^pply 
and expend property and moneys for the Women's Educational 
and Industrial Union. 



Dr. 

From Women's Educational and 

Industrial Union . . . $1,410 00 

Income from investments . . 1,556 78 

Miscellaneous . . . . 217 00 

Total current receipts . . $3,183 78 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 102 44 



$3,286 22 



Cr. 
Interest on mortgage . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



. $3,060 00 
50 



. $3,060 50 
225 72 



$3,286 22 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$315,000; amount of mortgage on same, $68,000; value of invest- 
ments, $35,530.38. 



146 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



WOOD MEMORIAL HOME, INC., Boston. (Incorporated 1915.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1916. 

Lillian N. Brad way, President; Steward C. Wood worth, 84 
State St., Boston, Secretary; Robert F. Herrick, Treasurer. 
Home for convalescents and incurables. 



Dr. 

from investments . 


. $8,215 20 


Cr. 
Taxes .... 
Legal services . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 


• 

. $144 00 
44 62 




. $188 62 
. 8,026 58 




$8,215 20 


$8,215 20 



Value of real estate held for corporate purposes, $27,200; 
value of investments, $415,800. 



WORKING GIRLS' HOME AND HOME OP THE GREY NUNS (ST. 
HELENA'S HOUSE) , 89 Union Park St. , Boston. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Rt. Rev. J. P. E. 
O'Connell, D.D., Secretary and Treasurer; Sister M. Duffin, Su- 
perior. 

To provide a home for respectable working girls at a low rate. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 29. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 3,156, viz., 2,982 
paying, 96 partly paying, 78 free; number of families aided, 89. 



Dr. 



Board 
Miscellaneous 



$31,943 77 
589 75 



Total current receipts . . $32,533 52 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 507 37 



$33,040 89 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies . . . . 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$4,641 01 

48 75 

15,401 63 

3,371 34 



7,056 93 
22 61 

$30,542 27 
2,498 62 

$33,040 89 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$277,000; mortgage on same, $85,000. 






Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



147 



Bridgewatee. 

BRIDGEWATER VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, Bridgewater. (In- 
corporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Flora T. Little, President; Miss Edith M. Ames, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Alice V. Pratt, 94 Broad St., Bridgewater, Treasurer. 

To give the sick, and especially those of limited means, the 
best home nursing under existing circumstances; also to assist in 
projects to benefit the public health. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 189, viz., 152 paying, 37 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Membership fees 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$364 00 

269 18 

30 00 

205 00 


$868 18 
363 58 


$1,231 76 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Provisions and supplies 
Carfare of nurse 
Telephone . 

Special treatment . . . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$975 00 

17 75 
5 00 

13 91 
8 57 

30 00 

$1,050 23 
181 53 

$1,231 76 



Value of investments, $1,044.67. 



Brockton. 

BROCKTON DAY NURSERY, 39 Everett St., Brockton. (Incorporated 

1907.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Adelaide E. Shaw, President; Clara M. Folger, Secretary; Hattie 
M. Ford, Treasurer; Mrs. Mary B. Mayer, Matron. 

To care for young children during the working hours of the 
mothers. The building and endowment fund is held by the cor- 
poration of the Douglas Gift to the Brockton Day Nursery. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number of days' care, 4,732. 



148 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $312 77 

Annuities and bequests to income 620 06 

Tag day 793 55 



Total current receipts . . $1,726 38 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 538 04 



$2,264 42 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Sewer and water rates 

Tag day . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$618 89 

6 39 
429 03 
232 60 

149 98 
46 14 
20 00 

. $1,503 03 
761 39 

$2,264 42 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$1,000. 

BROCKTON HOSPITAL COMPANY, 680 Centre St., Brockton. (Incor- 
porated 1890.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

George H. Leach, President; Dr. Loring B. Packard, Secretary 
and Superintendent; William G. Allen, Treasurer. 

Care of medical, surgical, obstetrical and emergency cases. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 43 (including 20 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,203; number 
of free patients, 36; total number of hospital days during year, 
18,885; total number of visits in out-patient department during 
year, 1,745. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 
Free beds .... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$18,133 31 


8,000 00 


6,196 92 


7,818 47 


3,150 00 


609 30 


$43,908 00 


701 03 


$44,609 03 



Cr. 
Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses .... 
Corporation expenses 
Capital expenses 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$5,085 34 

9,119 90 

15,697 62 

6,392 56 
547 39 

3,826 08 
493 60 

$41,162 49 
3,446 54 

$44,609 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$87,638; value of investments, $161,532.22. 



BROCKTON VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, 64 West Elm St., Brockton. 

(Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Herbert L. Tinkham, President; Mrs. Joseph Hewett, 
Secretary; Mrs. Charles S. Pierce, ^Treasurer; Mrs. Mary McGee, 
Supervising Nurse. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



149 



To give the sick, and especially those of limited means, the 
best home nursing under existing circumstances. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 1,672, viz., 251 paying, 132 partly 
paying, 705 free; 244 Metropolitan Life Insurance Company 
cases and 340 city of Brockton cases. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . . . $960 34 
Subscriptions and donations . 2,319 33 
City of Brockton . . . 1,070 67 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Com- 
pany 984 33 

Carnation day .... 1,827 28 

Musicale . . . . . 226 70 

Miscellaneous . . . . 160 80 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$7,549 45 
1,227 39 



$8,776 84 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $4,970 36 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 272 17 

Rent 330 00 

Light 12 20 

Car fares and taxi service . . 367 53 

Telephone . . . . 39 85 

Carnation day expense . . 434 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 71 46 

Total current expenses . . $6,497 57 

Cash on hand .... 2,279 27 

$8,776 84 



WALES HOME FOR AGED WOMEN, 553 North Main St., Brockton. (In- 
corporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Horace A. Keith, President; Mrs. Lillian M. Keith, Secretary; 
Ottielena Field, Treasurer; Miss Emily A. Silver, Matron. 

Home for aged women not less than seventy years of age and 
residents of Brockton for five years preceding application. Ad- 
mission fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 13. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,135 68 

Subscriptions and donations . 634 58 

Annuities and bequests to income 3,810 41 

Income from investments . . 1,116 37 

Miscellaneous . . . . 41 05 



Total current receipts . . $6,738 09 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 443 17 



$7,181 26 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$1,538 30 

2 81 

2,376 24 

414 02 

1,599 35 
139 28 



$6,070 00 
1,111 26 

$7,181 26 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$21,000; value of investments, $103,592.42. 



150 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Brookline. 

BROOKLINE DAY NURSERY, 10 Walter Ave., Brookline. (Incorporated 

1900.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Frederic Higginson, President, Mrs. George D. Burrage, 
Secretary; Mrs. Charles F. Richardson, Treasurer; Miss Gena N. 
Dorsey, Matron. 

The care of children under six years of age during the day, 
while their mothers are at work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 140. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$384 85 


Salaries and wages 


$1,880 55 


Subscriptions and donations 


1,940 86 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




Annuities and bequests to income 


1,554 79 


plies .... 


94 32 


Income from investments . 


72 54 


Provisions and supplies 


937 68 


Birthday brigade 


300 00 


Water tax 


31 32 


Additional, 1914 fair . 


51 25 


Heat, light and power 


49 23 


Second-hand clothing sales . 


223 34 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




For playground expenses 


107 00 


pairs .... 


130 16 


Miscellaneous .... 


30 00 


Telephone . 


35 69 






Insurance 

Expense of playground 


28 20 
170 25 


Total current receipts 


$4,664 63 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


606 39 


Federation of day nurseries 


3 00 






Safe deposit box 

Total current expenses 


5 00 




. $3,365 40 






Deposited 


1,005 00 






Cash on hand . 


900 62 




$5,271 02 


$5,271 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $1,011.11. 



THE BROOKLINE FRIENDLY SOCIETY, corner High and Walnut Sts., 
Brookline. (Incorporated 1905.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. James M. Codman, President; Harold C. Haskell, Secre- 
tary; Albert P. Briggs, Treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth K. Taft, Super- 
intendent, Social Service Department. 

To co-operate with the poor of Brookline in efforts for their 
improvement. Incidentally, numerous departments have been 
established, as summer camp, district nurse, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year b$ district nursing and infant hy- 
giene department, 793, viz., 340 paying, 12 partly paying, 441 
free; aided by social service department, 44. 



Part II.] CHARITABLP] CORPORATIONS. 



151 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Rents ..... 
From moving pictures 
Miscellaneous . . . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$1,408 57 

9,833 07 

550-00 

778 00 

294 50 

1,440 14 

93 35 

$14,397 63 

520 25 



$14,917 88 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Summer camp 

Moving pictures 

Interest .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$6,790 03 

534 33 

1,544 71 

726 63 

203 16 
995 19 
1,635 69 
332 16 
114 52 



$12,876 42 

100 00 

1,941 46 

$14,917 88 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$54,106.39; amount of mortgage on same, $4,500; value of invest- 
ments, $18,211.69. 

FREE HOSPITAL FOR WOMEN, Pond Ave., Brookline. (Incorporated 

1879.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

George R. Fearing, Jr., President; Nathaniel U. Walker, Secre- 
tary; Frederick J. Bradlee, Treasurer; Miss H. J. Ewin, Superin- 
tendent. 

Care and treatment of needy women suffering from diseases 
peculiar to their sex. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 56 (including 15 gradu- 
ate nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 882; total num- 
ber of hospital days during year, 13,923; total number of visits 
in out-patient department during year, 8,124. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
From various funds 
Bequests and investments 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$18,724 85 

21,853 99 

5,650 67 

126,605 83 


$172,835 34 
2,151 17 


$174,986 51 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies . 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs . ... 

Medical laboratory supplies 
To various funds 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Investments . 
Cash on hand 



$17,348 89 

284 54 

10,491 65 

5,413 25 

3,591 68 
3,148 08 
4,242 19 
1,330 71 

$45,850 99 

125,570 45 

3,565 07 

$174,986 51 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$150,000; value of investments, $544,282.60. 



152 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Cambridge. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF CAMBRIDGE, 763 Massachusetts Ave., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1883.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Carroll W. Doten, President; Miss Mary H. Winslow, Secre- 
tary; Henry A. Nichols, Treasurer; Miss Mary L. Birtwell, Gen- 
eral Secretary. 

To promote co-operation among societies and individuals; to 
study the needs of all applicants and secure prompt and adequate 
treatment; to develop self-help; preserve the home; encourage 
thrift; diminish pauperism; enlist and train volunteers, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number of families or individuals dealt with or worked for, 
757; number of families or individuals who received material 
relief, 221. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 



$5,901 37 
698 35 
114 47 

$6,714 19 
3,275 00 



$9,989 19 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Rent .... 

Light . . . ' . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Telephones 

Carfares .... 

Collecting subscriptions 

Delegate to National Conference 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Deficit November 1, 1915 . 
Cash on hand 



$5,460 10 

350 52 

498 63 

3 34 

101 29 
212 58 
117 30 
14 80 
91 56 
299 52 

$7,149 64 

2,717 93 

121 62 

$9,989 19 



Value of investments, $15,148.37. 



AVON HOME, 689 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1874.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

William W. Dallinger, President; Mrs. Charles L. Stebbins, 
Clerk; Miss Mary A. Ellis, Treasurer; Miss Emma O. Stannard, 
General Secretary. 

Cares for children (boys and girls) found destitute within the 
limits of Cambridge (placing work). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 152; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
23; in part, 107; not reimbursed, 22; monthly average number of 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



153 



children under supervision in foster homes, 70; number of placing- 
out visitors, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
May sale 
Treasurer of country week 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$5,261 28 
1,243 78 
9,353 41 
1,047 62 
1,970 43 

$18,876 52 

441 52 



$19,318 04 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $4,067 67 


Printing, postage and office sup- 


plies .... 


446 85 


Rent .... 


542 00 


Traveling 


236 61 


Clothing 


401 30 


Boarding homes 


8,927 68 


Board at infants' hospital . 


600 00 


Country week board 


1,970 43 


Miscellaneous . 


899 58 


Total current expenses . 


. $18,092 12 


Income invested 


448 33 


Cash on hand . 


777 59 




$19,318 04 



Value of real estate owned, $25,000; value of investments, 
$200,000. 

THE BAPTIST HOME, 308 Brookline St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending January 16, 1916. 

Conroy P. Hall, President; William A. McCoy, Secretary; 
Franklin P. Daly, Treasurer; Anna M. Cummings, Matron. 
Home for aged persons of the Baptist faith in Massachusetts. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 
Number aided during year, 35. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $2,411 13 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,404 34 

Income from investments . . 7,398 33 

Total current receipts . . $12,213 80 

Loans to income . . . 8,500 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 5,474 27 



$26,188 07 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$3,302 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


172 44 


Provisions and supplies 


2,965 14 


Heat, light and power 


1,046 95 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


630 72 


Taxes ..... 


117 57 


Miscellaneous .... 


1,931 85 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$10,166 67 

14,139 44 

1,881 96 

$26,188 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$21,500; value of investments, $90,000. 



BETHESDA SOCIETY, 309 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 

1854.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Raymond Calkins, President; Ada T. Cushing, Secretary; 
Lewis Kennedy Morse, Treasurer; Anna P. Hincks, Executive 
Secretary. 



154 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Home for wayward girls. 
Number of paid officers or em 
Number aided during year, 18, 
4 free. 

Dr. 



ployees, 1 (at close of year), 
viz., 9 paying, 5 partly paying, 



From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
From sale of goods . 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning 
year .... 



of 



$518 61 

286 00 

1,950 00 

5,734 48 

56 71 

$8,545 80 

3,756 87 



$12,302 67 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Vaults, insurance, advertising 
and sundry expenses 

Traveling expenses . 

Telephone and telegraph . 

Medical and dental work . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . . 



$3,042 85 

339 27 

1,625 55 

576 59 

29137 

157 56 
70 01 

109 53 
83 52 

$6,296 25 
4,036 31 
1,970 11 

$12,302 67 



Value of investments, $125,241.78. 



CAMBRIDGE ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS ASSOCIATION, 689 Massachusetts 
Ave., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Eugene A. Darling, M.D., President; Mrs. Mabel Greeley 
Smith, General Secretary; A. Mead Wheeler, Treasurer. 

To study conditions concerning tuberculosis in Cambridge; to 
inform the community as to causes and prevention of tubercu- 
losis; and to arouse general interest in securing adequate provi- 
sion for the care of tuberculous patients in their homes, in hos- 
pitals and in sanatoria. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Subscriptions and donations 


$1,760 00 


Salaries and wages 




$1,667 50 


Sale of Red Cross seals 


676 00 


Printing, postage and office 


sup- 




Interest . 


5 63 


plies .... 
Donations 




195 65 
50 00 






Total current receipts 


$2,441 63 


Rent .... 




333 34 


Borrowed . . . . 


400 00 


Light .... 




1 73 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


32 13 


Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 
Telephone 
Educational 
Expenses of delegate . 
Interest .... 

Total current expenses 


re- 


2 60 
70 90 
33 90 
53 00 

4 25 




$2,412 87 






Loans repaid 




450 00 






Cash on hand . 




10 89 




$2,873 76 


$2,873 76 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



155 



CAMBRIDGE HOMES FOR AGED PEOPLE, 360 Mt. Auburn St., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1887.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Jeremiah Smith, Jr., President; Miss Helen W. Aubin, Secre- 
tary; George Howland Cox, Treasurer; Miss Christine Nicholson, 
Matron. 

Home for Protestant persons, not less than sixty-five years of 
age, residents of Cambridge for ten years or more. Admission, 
$300 for single person; $450 for couple. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 56; outside institu- 
tion, 1. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Legacies unrestricted 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of securities 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$3,810 41 
1,541 20 

10,197 06 

2,000 00 

183 72 


$17,732 39 
6,604 75 

975 46 


$25,312 60 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Burial expenses 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Outdoor relief . 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$4,880 80 

278 09 
6,378 53 

974 69 
1,823 63 

799 49 

324 00 

36 02 

498 69 

$15,993 94 

7,487 77 
1,830 89 

$25,312 60 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes* 
$109,066.66; value of investments, $193,896.34. 



CAMBRIDGE HOSPITAL, 330 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 

1871.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Henry P. Walcott, President; Albert M. Barnes, Secretary; 
George A. Giles, Acting Assistant Treasurer; Alma E. Grant, Su- 
perintendent. 

Hospital for sick and disabled persons. Chronic and contagious 
diseases (except scarlet fever and diphtheria) not admitted. No 
other restrictions. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 70 (including 24 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,253; number 
of free patients, 211; total number of hospital days during year, 
20,984; number of free days, 3,333; total number of visits in out- 
patient department, 7,688. 



156 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments 


$25,015 48 


Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 


$21,013 34 


Voluntary contributions . 


3,590 86 


Provisions and supplies . 


15,954 05 


Interest, dividends and rentals 


15,288 69 


General house and property 




Unrestricted legacies 


52,694 00 


expenses .... 


11,204 43 


From sale of medicines, sup- 




Medicines and appliances 


3,950 60 


plies, etc. .... 


1,485 60 


Fuel 


5,015 20 






Miscellaneous 


1,649 14 






Total hospital receipts 


$98,074 63 








From sale of bonds and rights 


31 26 


Total hospital expenses 


$58,786 76 


Investments, mortgages, etc., 




Harvard Trust Company, pay- 




paid 


16,496 53 


ment of loan 


20,000 00 


Harvard Trust Company, loan 


5,000 00 


Investments „ 


39,559 00 


New building account 


534 61 


New building account 


656 41 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Cash on hand 


4,676 49 


year ..... 


3,541 63 








$123,678 66 


$123,678 66 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$294,107.47; value of investments, $334,639.67. 



CAMBRIDGEPORT FRUIT AND FLOWER MISSION, Cambridge. (In- 
corporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Miss Susan A. Hovey, Presideni; Miss Alice C. Taylor, Secre- 
tary; Miss Sarah A. Wilson, 360 Mt. Auburn St., Cambridge, , 
Treasurer. 

To distribute fruit, flowers and delicacies among the sick poor 
of Cambridge. 

Number aided during year, 60. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts 
From bank 



$35 61 
60 58 



$96 19 
42 63 



$138 82 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 



$138 82 



$138 82 



Value of investments, $1,746.07. 



CAMBRIDGE VISITING NURSING ASSOCIATION, 35 Bigelow St., Cam- 
bridge. (Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending February 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Woodward Emery, President; Miss Elizabeth B. Piper, 
Secretary; Miss Alberta M. Houghton, Treasurer; Mrs. Katherine 
M. Hagar, R.N., Superintendent. 

The amelioration of human suffering. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 

Number of calls made during year, 19,342. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



157 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Bequest and interest on same 
Income from investments . 
From city for services 
From concert and talks by nurses 
Miscellaneous . 



$5,369 69 
2,561 41 
2,078 00 
331 29 
297 55 
464 00 
614 63 



$11,716 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Drugs and hospital supplies 

Telephone 

Car fares 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Transferred to permanent fund 
Deficit .... 
Cash on hand . 



$5,647 24 

207 16 

2,346 80 

305 03 

93 59 
129 32 

48 83 

505 00 

3 12 



$9,286 09 


2,178 00 


121 62 


130 86 



$11,716 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,500; value of investments, $13,178. 



COLUMBUS DAY NURSERY OF CAMBRIDGE, 252 Green St., Cambridge. 
(Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

Jeremiah F. Sullivan, President; Edward A. Counihan, Secre- 
tary; Timothy W. Good, Treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth A. Madden, 
Matron. 

To provide a home during the day time for the children of 
working mothers, and for other charitable purposes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year: in nursery, 167, all partly paying; 
outside nursery, 147. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Interest .... 
Rent . . . . 



$376 45 

1,340 59 

8 21 

180 00 



Total current receipts . . $1,905 25 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 566 65 



$2,471 90 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light aDd power 

Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 

Interest, water and taxes 

Telephone 

Guild expenses . 

Christmas 

1914 bills .... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$884 00 

27 75 
289 90 
170 65 

64 90 

197 72 

30 54 
139 72 

47 38 

31 73 



$1,884 29 
587 61 

$2,471 90 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,500; amount of mortgage on same, $2,500. 



158 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



EAST END CHRISTIAN UNION, 7 Burleigh St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 

1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Henry R. Brigham, President; Miss Priscilla Jouett, Secretary; 
Henry M. Spelman, Treasurer; Artemas Packard, Head Worker. 

For the purpose of carrying forward, on a nonsectarian basis, 
Sunday school, temperance, industrial and such other work as 
shall seem best for the good of the neighborhood. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$126 20 


Salaries and wages 


$1,817 00 


2,474 60 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




1,600 00 


plies .... 


262 02 


239 14 


Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 


292 44 






$4,439 94 


pairs 


114 62 


419 61 


Water rates 


11 50 




Insurance . 


82 81 




Telephone .... 


32 71 




Playground, cooking school and 






kindergarten .... 
Total current expenses 


336 53 




$2,949 63 




Cash on hand .... 


1,909 92 


$4,859 55 


$4,859 55 



Value of investments, $5,200. 



THE HOLY GHOST HOSPITAL FOR INCURABLES, 1575 Cambridge St., 
Cambridge. (Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Sister M. J*. Tasse, President and Superintendent; Sister M. A. 
Fennell, Secretary and Treasurer. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 64. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 164; number of 
free patients, 47. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Board of patients 
Work .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$8,408 34 
1,684 31 

40,767 45 
285 43 
562 24 


$51,707 77 
10,418 88 


$62,126 65 



Cr. 



Administration (wages) 


. $7,223 08 


Printing, etc. . 


255 56 


Provisions and supplies 


. 28,664 20 


Heat, etc. 


2,860 29 


Furnishings, etc. 


7,000 00 


Extraordinary repairs 


7,472 81 


Alms .... 


651 15 


Miscellaneous . 


338 63 


Total hospital expenses . 


. $54,466 22 


Cash on hand . 


7,660 43 




$62,126 65 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$192,000; value of investments, $16,773.43. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



159 



THE LAMSON HOME, 322 Brookline St., Cambridge. (Incorporated 1888.) 
Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Conray P. Hall, President; William Albert McCoy, Secretary; 
Franklin P. Daly, Treasurer; Anna M. Cummings, Matron. 

Home for aged members of Baptist churches, preference being 
given to Baptist ministers, their wives, widows or (adult) orphans. 

The institution is managed by the Baptist Home, and the in- 
come from its investments is paid to said corporation. 

Cr. 



Dr. 

Income from investments . 
Mortgage principal paid 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$318 62 
1,850 00 

$2,168 62 
2,786 35 

$4,954 97 



Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$0 50 



$0 50 

4,309 72 

644 75 

$4,954 97 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, $8,000. 



Canton. 

THE CANTON NURSING ASSOCIATION, 31 Rockland St., Canton. (In- 
corporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Eliza R. Sumner, President; Miss Nathalia Bent, Secre- 
tary; Edward H. R. Revere, Treasurer; Miss Villa M. TrerTrey, 
Superintendent. 

To maintain a system of nursing in the town of Canton and its 
vicinity. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 313, viz., 308 paying, 
3 partly paying, 2 free; outside institution, 233, viz., 212 paying, 
1 partly paying, 20 free; number of families aided, 21. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Insurance companies' fees . 
Canton board of health 
Supplies furnished 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,611 24 

2,301 93 

214 00 

60 00 

6 07 

26 90 

$4,220 14 
183 64 
412 56 



$4,816 34 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental 
pairs 

Telephone 

Laundry . 

Insurance 

Loan paid 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$1,941 69 

47 29 

1,062 95 

312 00 

224 32 

784 19 

76 54 

116 98 

2 75 

183 64 

35 

$4,752 70 
63 64 

$4,816 34 



160 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Chelsea. 

CHELSEA DAY NURSERY AND CHILDREN'S HOME, 148 Shawmut St., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

J. F. Knowlton, President; Miss A. Louise Long, Secretary; 
Mrs. Florence M. Knowles, Treasurer; Mrs. Mabel L. Blackburn, 
Matron. 

Day nursery and temporary care for children (boys and girls) 
under the age of twelve years, whose parents or legal guardians 
are residents of Chelsea. 

Number of paid employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 67, viz., 14 paying, 53 partly pay- 
ing. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Board of children 
Membership dues 

Total current receipts 
Withdrawn from banks 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$398 48 
100 00 
283 48 

1,807 14 
167 00 


$2,756 10 

258 08 

23 59 


$3,037 77 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 

Ice 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs 
Grading yard 
Telephone 
Insurance 

Water .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,430 84 

54 00 
880 43 

10 62 
301 71 

96 59 
25 00 
23 97 
58 08 
49 15 
88 37 



$3,018 76 
19 01 

$3,037 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$19,000; value of investments, $4,725. 



CHELSEA HEBREW SHELTERING HOME, 22 Walnut St., Chelsea. (In- 
corporated 1914.) 

Report for year ending November 3, 1916. 

Max Borigovsky, President; Harry Gold, Secretary; Isadore 
Winsman, Treasurer. 

To supply meals and shelter for poor Hebrews. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $320 50 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 168 23 



$488 73 



Cr. 
Provisions, supplies, rent, 

light and power 
Cash on hand 



heat, 



$252 82 
235 91 



$488 73 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



161 



CHEVRA KADISHA OF CHELSEA, corner Fourth and Walnut Sts., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending December 11, 1915. 

L. S. Weinberg, President; N. Taymor, Secretary; Samuel 
Lavetts, Treasurer. 

To distribute charity among the needy, and to bury the dead 
of the poor Hebrews of Chelsea in the cemetery in Montvale 
owned by the corporation. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 84, viz., 50 paying, 8 partly paying, 
26 free. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Lots sold ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$245 40 

70 50 

867 00 

53 00 


$1,235 90 

1,000 00 

885 94 


$3,121 84 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $418 83 


Printing, postage and office sup- 


plies . ... 


9 80 


Incidental repairs 


65 74 


Water tax 


29 58 


Donation .... 


100 00 


Mortgage .... 


150 00 


Miscellaneous . 


43 81 


Total current expenses 


. $817 76 


Income invested 


. 1,000 00 


Cash on hand . 


. 1,304 08 




$3,121 84 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $8,000. 



OLD LADIES' HOME ASSOCIATION OP CHELSEA, 3 Nichols St., Chelsea. 

(Incorporated 1885.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Roscoe Pierce, President; Edwin H. Curry, Treasurer; Mrs. Ida 
M. Benson, Matron. 

Home for Protestant women at least sixty years of age and 
residents of Chelsea for ten years. Admission fee, $150. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



162 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $150 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 7 00 

Bequests 1,100 00 

Income from investments . . 2,882 00 

Total current receipts . . $4,139 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4,485 76 



$8,624 76 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Taxes, water and street 

Heat, light and water 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

To inmates 

Funeral expense 

Safe deposit box 

Total current expenses 
Invested .... 
Cash on hand . 



$941 45 

1 75 

978 00 

43 54 

218 30 

131 48 
28 00 

188 00 

90 00 

5 00 

$2,625 52 
4,071 67 
1,927 57 

$8,624 76 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$,500; value of investments, $62,900. 



RUFUS S. FROST GENERAL HOSPITAL, 100 Bellingham St., Chelsea. 

(Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Edward E. Willard, President; Oliver E. Wyeth, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Emily Pine, Superintendent. 

Treatment of sick persons. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 48 (including 25 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,630; number 
of free patients, 57; total number of hospital days during year, 
18,023; number of free days, 252; total number of visits in out- 
patient department during year, 1,658. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments , 
Patients' payments for district 
nurse ..... 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Medical and surgical supplies 
Telephone .... 

Maintenance . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$35,334 32 


365 


12 


33 


94 


941 


77 


516 


50 


68 79 


31 


06 


357 


52 


$37,649 02 


413 05 


SS38.nfi2 


07 



Cr. 
Administration 
General house and property ex- 



Rent 

Interest . 

District nurse (salary) 

Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,000 00 

32,325 95 

1,368 00 

967 50 

716 40 

1,274 80 

$37,652 65 

409 42 



$38,062 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$60,000; amount of mortgage on same, $19,350; value of invest- 
ments, $17,950. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



163 



SOLDIERS' HOME IN MASSACHUSETTS, TRUSTEES OP, Crest Ave., 
Chelsea. (Incorporated 1877.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

Eli W. Hall, President; Joseph B. Maccabe, Secretary; Charles 
K. Darling, Treasurer; Richard R. Foster, Commandant. 

Care of indigent soldiers and sailors of Civil and Spanish wars. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 170. 
Number aided during year, 810. 






Dr. 
From beneficiaries . 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Insurance dividends 
Second-hand articles sold 
Effects of deceased members 
Burial expenses refunded 
Miscellaneous refunds 



. $150,779 32 

11 00 

4,254 28 

565 22 

577 74 

1,521 34 

202 00 

1 96 



Total current receipts . . $157,912 86 

Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . . 30,636 27 



$188,549 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . ■ . 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies . 

Insurance 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Permanent repairs 

Clothing 

Burial expenses 

Petty cash fund 

Hospital supplies 

Farm and live stock 

Paid to heirs of deceased mem 
bers .... 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$55,997 84 

1,247 42 
46,006 61 

4,998 13 
15,553 25 

9,083 01 
8,050 06 
4,320 33 
130 00 
600 00 
3,090 98 
. 868 80 

854 62 
1,424 80 

$152,225 85 
36,323 28 

$188,549 13 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$485,214; value of investments, $67,016.25. 



Chicopee. 

THE SHERMAN REST HOME, 259 Chicopee St., Chicopee. (Incorporated 

1900.) 

Report for year ending November 5, 1916. 

Miss Clara F. Palmer, President; Charles H. Jenness, Secretary 
and Treasurer; Mrs. Henrietta M. Macomber, Matron. 
Vacation rest home for working girls and women. 
Number of paid employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 12, viz., 7 paying, 5 free. 



164 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Interest . . . . 

Rent of land 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$16 75 

28 00 

90 48 

40 00 

15 

$175 38 
2,277 49 



$2,452 87 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Provisions and supplies 

Telephone 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings 

Shingling barn roof 

Insurance 

Water 

Board 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$112 50 


56 58 


5 25 


8 00 


15 16 


167 14 


28 30 


10 00 


5 80 


7 98 


$416 71 


2,036 16 


$2,452 87 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,500; value of investments, $2,007.27. 

Clinton. 

CLINTON ASSOCIATION FOR THE RELIEF AND CONTROL OF TUBER- 
CULOSIS, 205 Church St., Clinton. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Dr. Walter P. Bowers, President; Miss Ellen K. Stevens, Secre- 
tary; John S. Scully, Treasurer. 
Relief and control of tuberculosis. 
Number aided during year, 23; number of families aided, 1. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Red Cross seals 
Miscellaneous . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$117 04 

261 79 

412 44 

18 75 

$810 02 
1,069 12 



$1,879 14 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Rent . 

Red Cross seals 
To Clinton hospital . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$3 30 

3 00 

72 17 

1,500 00 

10 00 

$1,588 47 
290 67 

$1,879 14 



Value of investments, $5,080.44. 



THE CLINTON HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, 271 Church St., Clinton. 

(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 18, 1916. 

Jonathan Smith, President; Eli Forbes, Secretary; Jennie S. 
Dame, Treasurer; Lillian A. Pratt, Superintendent. 

Home for respectable and indigent men and women at least 
sixty years of age and residents of Clinton. Admission fee, $200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 15. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



165 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,402 79 

Subscriptions and donations . 571 00 

Income from investments . . 2,318 52 

Miscellaneous . . . 256 92 

Total current receipts . . $4,549 23 

Loans to income . . . 805 10 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 458 98 



$5,813 31 



Cr. 

Salaries and -wages . . . $1,611 72 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Funerals .... 

Board of patient at Worcester 
hospital 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



32 76 

1,779 84 

350 00 

619 04 

538 54 
118 00 

74 64 
337 62 



$5,462 16 
351 15 

$5,813 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $53,678. 



CLINTON HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, Highland St., Clinton. (Incor- 
_ porated 1899.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Dr. Walter P. Bowers, President; Eli Forbes, Secretary; Thomas 
S. Davis, Treasurer; Miss Marion B. Dibblee, Superintendent. 

Care and relief of sick or injured persons, irrespective of creed, 
nationality or color. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 40 (including 21 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 841; total num- 
ber of hospital days during year, 16,322. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Cash donation 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Dispensary receipts . 

Total receipts 
Investments withdrawn 
Cash borrowed 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year . . 



$19,253 76 


4,175 61 


5,017 31 


4,702 42 


262 35 


190 17 


$33,601 62 


1,816 55 


$35,418 17 


4,000 00 


1,800 00 


2,579 85 


<U3 70S 02 



Cr. 



Administration 


$9,097 44 


Professional care of patients 


6,440 80 


Department expenses 


13,470 20 


General house and property ex- 




penses . 


10,224 27 


Total expenses 


$39,232 71 


Income invested 


3,422 50 


Cash on hand .... 


1,142 81 



$43,798 02 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$100,000; value of investments, $101,820.25. 



166 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Concord. 

CONCORD FEMALE CHARITABLE SOCIETY, Concord. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending January 12, 1916. 

Mrs. Sherman Hoar, President; Mrs. Charles E. Brown, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Herbert W. Hosmer, Treasurer. 

To relieve distress and encourage industry among the female 
part of the community; especial attention given to the needs of 
poor children. 

Number aided during year, 18. 



Dr. 
Donations . 
Income from investments 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$136 00 
106 26 
367 00 

$609 26 
7 18 



$616 44 



Cr. 
Printing and postage . 
Provisions and supplies 
Medical attendance 
Charity 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Investments 
Cash on hand 



$9 30 
386 52 
50 00 
35 00 
15 55 

$496 37 

100 00 

20 07 

$616 44 



Value of investments, $2,750. 



CONCORD'S HOME FOR THE AGED, 32 Walden St., Concord. (Incor- 
porated 1887.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

William Wheeler, President; Miss Marion B. Keyes, Secretary; 
William H. Brown, Treasurer; Mrs. Anna R. Miller, Matron. 

Home for aged persons not less than sixty years of age and resi- 
dents of Concord for at least five years. Admission fee, $100. 

Number of paid employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



167 



Dr. 



Cr. 



From beneficiaries 


$197 00 


Salaries and wages 




$889 50 


Subscriptions and donations 


275 00 


Printing, postage and office 


sup- 




Income from investments . 


2,443 79 


plies .... 




28 75 


Miscellaneous .... 


15 00 


Provisions and supplies 
Telephone 




757 74 
24 45 








Total current receipts 


$2,930 79 


Heat, light and water 




285 25 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


434 33 


Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 
Nursing and care of inmates 


re- 


113 09 

310 85 






Medical attendance and medicine 


42 22 






Funeral expenses 




63 00 






Insurance 




12 00 






Ice ..... 




18 25 






Interest .... 




20 00 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 




31 75 




$2,596 85 






Income invested 




23 28 






Cash on hand . 




744 99 




$3,365 12 


$3,365 12 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500; value of investments, $57,629.67. 



NEW ENGLAND DEACONESS ASSOCIATION, Concord. (Incorporated 

1889, 1893.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Willard T. Perrin, President; Theodore A. Hildreth, Secre- 
tary; C. H. J. Kimball, Treasurer; Miss Edith F. Bennett, Super- 
intendent. 

Hospital service, medical, surgical and obstetrical work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 15 (including 7 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 293; number of 
free patients, 22; total number of hospital days during year, 
3,643. 



Dr. 




Cr. 




Patients' payments . 


$6,949 95 


Administration . 


. $331 29 


Voluntary contributions 


20 00 


Professional care of patients 


. 1,223 59 


Miscellaneous .... 


126 40 


Provisions and groceries 


. 1,932 78 






Wages .... 


1,274 85 






Total hospital receipts 


$7,096 35 


Fuel, water and light 


765 98 


Cash on hand at beginning of year 


145 10 


General house and property ex- 








penses .... 


344 14 






Postage, carfare, express 


125 89 






Laundry .... 


566 35 






Telephone 


115 56 






Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 


85 66 




$6,766 09 






Cash on hand . 


475 36 




$7,241 45 


$7,241 45 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$29,963.55; value of investments, $4,610. 



168 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Danveks. 

DAN VERS HOME FOR THE AGED, Park St., Danvers. 

1901.) 

Report for year ending June 1, 1916. 



(Incorporated 



Harriet Whiting, Secretary 
Emma J. Fairfield, Matron. 

Home for aged persons over sixty-five. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2 
Number aided during year, 8. 



George O. Stimpson, Treasurer; 
Admission fee, $200. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 


$1,800 00 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 


. $1,213 16 


Subscriptions and donations 


71 73 


Provisions and supplies 


799 17 


Annuities and bequests to income 


2,411 30 


Heat, light and power 


281 41 


Income from investments . 


1,981 74 


Furnishings and incidental re- 


Dues ..... 


161 00 


pairs .... 


73 76 


Tag day 


300 85 


Telephone 


31 10 


Lawn party .... 


60 30 


Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


189 80 


Total current receipts . 


$6,786 92 


. $2,588 40 


Mortgage paid 


4,900 00 


Invested 


. 8,989 22 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Cash on hand . 


667 99 


year ..... 


558 69 








$12,245 61 


$12,245 61 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$6,000; value of investments, $29,110.91. 



DANVERS VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, 428 Maple St., Danvers. 

(Incorporated 1908.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Mrs. George W. Towne, President; Miss Clara Putnam Hale, 
Secretary; Miss Isabel B. Tapley, Treasurer. 

To assist those residents of Danvers who need the services of a 
trained nurse, and to encourage effort for the scientific care of the 
sick. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 308 (2,349 visits). 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $324 45 

Metropolitan Insurance Company 224 00 

Members' fees, etc. . . . 957 95 

Income from investments . . 53 30 

Supplies 4 07 

Entertainments, Red Cross seals, 

etc 333 06 

Miscellaneous . . . . 68 91 

Total current receipts . . $1,965 74 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,058 57 



$3,024 31 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Traveling expenses 
Telephone 

Printing and postage . 
Supplies . 

Rent of post-office box 
Bag and instruments . 
Milk for patients 
Supplies for tubercular patients 



$1,541 75 
79 85 
22 29 
15 40 
98 06 
2 40 

6 95 
24 32 

7 33 



Total current expenses . . $1,798 35 
Cash on hand .... 1,225 96 



$3,024 31 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



169 



Dedham. 

DEDHAM EMERGENCY NURSING ASSOCIATION, High St., Dedham. 

(Incorporated 1893.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Miss Margaret Warren, President; Miss Mary F. Snelling, Sec- 
retary; W. C. Williams, Treasurer. 

To provide nurses for the poor and sick in Dedham. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 423, viz., 180 paying, 243 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Metropolitan Life Insurance Corn- 



Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,228 55 

867 25 

99 17 

177 60 
94 88 


$2,467 45 
453 16 





Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Supplies .... 

Rent .... 

Heat and light . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 

Telephone 

Traveling expenses for 
visitors and patients 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,772 79 

74 00 
47 73 
25 00 
17 50 

142 56 
46 75 

52 42 
14 98 



$2,920 61 



$2,193 73 
726 88 



$2,920 61 



Value of investments, $2,100. 



DEDHAM TEMPORARY HOME FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN, Wash- 
ington St., Dedham. (Incorporated 1863.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Miss Mary deF. Denny, President, Miss E. N. Converse, Secre- 
tary; Miss A. E. Wilson, Treasurer; Miss Lola Merriman, Matron. 

A temporary home for tired or convalescent women. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 368, viz., 189 paying, 179 partly 
paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . ... 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Rent of pasture and barn . 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$3,350 65 


747 91 


2,000 


00 


2,255 69 


225 


00 


32 


60 


$8,611 


85 


554 


21 


$9,166 


06 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Insurance 
Tax on rented land 
Repairs and improvements 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,680 89 

90 21 
4,427 25 
49 50 
36 80 
753 73 
15 90 

$9,054 28 
111 78 

$9,166 06 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$6,400; value of investments, $53,600. 



170 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Easthampton. 

HELPING HAND SOCIETY, Manchester's Block, Main St., Easthampton. 

(Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Edith W. Winslow, President; Miss Edna P. Russell, 
Secretary; Mrs. Bertha L. Rust, Treasurer. 

To help the worthy poor of the town, and to carry on the 
visiting nurse work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided, 55. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Entertainments and food sales 
Dues .... 

Whiting Street and Wells funds 
Interest .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,436 13 
658 58 
27 30 
80 00 
29 90 
32 13 


$2,264 04 
957 80 


$3,221 84 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $1,148 50 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 67 62 

Provisions and supplies . . 610 99 

Rent 73 98 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 11 98 

Relief work .... 314 92 

Sewing class . . . . 32 69 

Miscellaneous . . . . 43 73 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,304 41 
917 43 

$3,221 84 



Everett. 

EVERETT COTTAGE HOSPITAL CORPORATION (runs Whidden Memo- 
rial Hospital), 100 Fremont Ave., Everett. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Herbert P. Wasgatt, President; Edwin A. Hilton, Secretary; F. 
Frederick Driscoll, Treasurer; Miss Hannah F. Seavey, Superin- 
tendent. 

General hospital work; reduced charges and free treatment 
when patients cannot afford to pay full rates. Creed, color or sex 
not considered. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 19 (including 11 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 376; number of 
free patients, 68; total number of hospital days during year, 
4,825; number of free days, 1,070. 






Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



171 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Nursing service 
Voluntary contributions . 
Free bed .... 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$6,551 71 


1,179 52 


166 76 


1,722 88 


300 00 


46 80 


$9,967 67 


446 77 


$10,414 44 



Cr. 
Matron . 
Nurses . 

General house and property ex- 
penses . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$750 00 
1,380 60 

7,866 40 

$9,997 00 
417 44 



$10,414 44 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000. 



EVERETT HOME FOR AGED PERSONS, 14 Hosmer .St., Everett. (In- 
corporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending April 10, 1916. 

John H. Stone, President; Lena B. Sanborn, Secretary; A. H. 
St. C. Chase, Treasurer; Lydia J. Chase, Matron. 

To provide for the support of aged persons of the Protestant 
faith. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 5. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



$2,593 86 
885 09 



$3,478 95 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . • . 

City of Everett taxes 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 



$312 00 

35 75 

414 59 
165 00 

955 24 
116 00 

$1,998 58 
1,480 37 

$3,478 95 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$3,800; value of investments, $18,415.92. 



NEW ENGLAND HOME FOR DEAF MUTES, 112 Fremont Ave., Everett. 

(Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending April 1, 1916. 

Rev. A. Z. Conrad, D.D., President; Alden M. Cleveland, Sec- 
retary; Phineas Hubbard, Treasurer; Mrs. Mabel A. Crockett, 
Matron. 

The care of aged, blind or infirm deaf mutes. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 12, viz., 5 partly paying, 7 free. 



172 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Ladies' auriliary 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Or. 



$57S 00 


Salaries and wages 


$1,865 00 


3,335 So 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




23 71 


plies .... 


260 05 


590 15 


Provisions and supplies 


1,115 36 


49 93 


Rent .... 


110 00 




Heat, light and power 


350 99 




$4,577 64 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




950 00 


pairs .... 


322 70 


34 37 


Interest .... 


116 58 




, Advertising 


108 00 




Nurse .... 


62 00 




Paid on mortgage 


500 00 




Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


116 06 




54,926 74 




Income invested 


490 00 




Cash on hand 


145 27 


§5.562 01 


$5,562 01 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500; amount of mortgage on same, $1,750; value of invest- 
ments, $8,100. 

Fajrhavex. 

FAIRHAVEN BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION, Fairhaven. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Walter P. Winsor, President; Miss Georgia E. Fairfield, 
Secretary and Treasurer. 

To help the sick and needy. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 14; number of families aided, 44. 



Dr. 

Donations .... 

Income from investments . 
Fees ..... 

Charity ball . 
Misee.laz.eous . 

Total current receipts 
Invested .... 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



$752 00 

401 60 

23 00 

220 06 

1 74 

$1,428 40 

10,040 00 

449 07 



$11,917 47 



Or. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Telephone 
Coal and wood 
Money 

Boots and rubbers 
Clothing 
Lunches . 
Community nurse 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$40 00 

4 04 

26 75 

25 00 

402 57 

25 00 
119 87 

26 93 
90 00 

100 00 
227 38 



$1,087 54 
10,040 00 

7S9 93 

$11,917 47 



Value of investments, 810,040. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



173 



THE LADIES' BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, Fairhaven. (Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Lillian G. Delano, President; Ardra A. Delano, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 
Relief of the poor. 
Number aided during year, 2; families aided, 1. 



Dr. 



Subscriptions and donations 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$78 25 
87 12 



$165 37 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power . 
Repairs 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$17 21 

1 10 

39 79 

28 82 

$86 92 
78 45 

$165 37 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
11,200, 

Fall River. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF FALL RIVER, 84 North Main St., Fall 
River. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

A. J. Abbe, M.D., President; Alice E. Wetherbee, Secretary; 
Oliver S. Hawes, Treasurer. 

To secure the concurrent and harmonious action of the differ- 
ent charities in Fall River, in order to raise the needy above 
relief, prevent begging and imposture, and diminish pauperism. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,353 00 

Income from investments . . 60 00 

Miscellaneous .... 1 07 

Total current receipts . . $1,414 07 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 76 54 



$1,490 61 

Value of investments, $1,750. 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . . . . . \ 
Rent . . 
Heat, light and power 
Telephone . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,094 00 

36 59 

240 00 

1 86 

45 01 

10 00 

. $1,427 46 
63 15 

$1,490 61 



174 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



BISHOP STANG DAY NURSERY, 217 Third St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1909.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Daniel F. Feehan, D.D., President; James H. Maho- 
ney, Secretary; Rt. Rev. James E. Cassidy, Treasurer; Rev. 
Mother Therese, Matron. 

The care of poor children during the day; also a milk station. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 210 families. Aggregate attend- 
ance, 22,272; average attendance, 80. 

Dr. 

From beneficiaries 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,359 35 



$2,918 20 
1,359 35 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental 
pairs .... 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $657 00 
. 1,087 59 

381 97 
re- 

104 28 




. $2,230 84 
. 2,046 71 


$4,277 55 


$4,277 55 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$40,000. 



BOYS' CLUB OF FALL RIVER, 374 Anawan St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1892.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1916. 

Bertram H. Borden, President; Walter I. Nichols, Secretary; 
James W. Bence, Treasurer; Thomas Chew, Superintendent. 

To improve the moral, physical and social nature of boys and 
young men by providing suitable games, libraries, baths and 
gymnasiums. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 13. 

Number aided during year, 1,700. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . * . 



$6,115 37 

4,475 79 

155 22 

100 92 

$10,847 30 

370 29 



$11,217 59 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Water and coal 

Insurance 

Camp .... 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$6,152 00 

107 07 
966 27 
636 52 

398 47 
1,288 45 
1,108 72 

270 67 
84 63 

156 01 



$11,168 81 
48 78 

$11,217 59 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



175 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$250,000; value of investments, $2,500. 



CHILDREN'S HOME OF FALL RIVER, 427 Robeson St., Fall River. (In- 
corporated 1873.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Benjamin S. C. Gifford, President; Ellen M. Shove, Secretary; 
Oliver K. Hawes, Treasurer; Miss Elizabeth T. Colburn, Matron. 

To care for orphan or otherwise needy children (boys and 
girls). 

Number of paid employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 63, viz., 48 partly paying, 15 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $2,242 50 

Subscriptions and donations . 787 21 

Income from investments . . 6,321 08 

Total current receipts . . $9,350 79 

Sale of bond .... 1,000 00 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,491 18 



$11,841 97 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Clothing 

Expense .... 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,976 23 

70 80 
3,280 27 
1,038 16 

1,137 20 
169 49 
555 28 

$9,227 43 

175 00 

2,439 54 

$11,841 97 



Value <of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, $152,531.47. 



DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION OF FALL RIVER, 374 Anawan St., 
Fall River. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

William B. Hawes, President; Mrs. Mary L. Richards, Secre- 
tary; Edward Brayton, Treasurer; Eugelia L. Eddy, Superin- 
tendent. 

To care for sick persons in their homes, and to instruct 
members of the household in simple rules of hygiene. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 1,930, viz., 98 paying, 77 partly 
paying, 1,755 free. 



176 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Paying patients 

Milk 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on band at beginning of 
year ..... 



$6,850 45 

2,590 29 

627 05 

115 00 

415 92 

$10,598 71 

2,344 32 



$12,943 03 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Nurses' supplies 

Milk 



$9,926 04 



506 43 

33 85 
218 24 
109 90 
Miscellaneous 955 52 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$11,749 98 
1,193 05 

$12,943 03 



FALL RIVER ANTI-TUBERCULOSIS SOCIETY, Fall River. (Incorporated 

1908.) 

Report for year ending November 12, 1916. 

Robert C. Davis, President; Thomas Chew, Secretary; Mrs. 
Catherine C. Kieran, Treasurer. 

To prevent tuberculosis, and to better the condition of persons 
suffering from it. 

Number of calls made, 2,569. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Sale of Red Cross seals 
Interest . . . . 



$258 00 

1,148 54 

17 70 



Total current receipts . . $1,424 24 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 319 15 



$1,743 39 



Cr. 



Salary . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 
Provisions and supplies 
Red Cross seals 
For patient at Sharon 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$780 00 

25 46 

28 03 

200 99 

111 83 

21 47 

$1,167 78 
575 61 

$1,743 39 



FALL RIVER DEACONESS HOME, 825 Second St., Fall River. (Incor- 
porated 1893.) 

Report for year ending May 12, 1916. 

Dr. William P. Pritchard, President; Mrs. S. W. Gibbs, Secre- 
tary; John W. Bury, Treasurer; Miss B. Marion Hope, Superin- 
tendent. 

Supports a home for deaconesses of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, an industrial home for girls, an industrial school, with 
classes in cooking, sewing, etc., and a fresh-air cottage at Oak 
Bluffs. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 400, viz., 100 paying, 
100 partly paying, 200 free; outside institution, 1,000, viz., 500 
paying, 50 partly paying, 450 free; number of families aided, 400. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



177 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $940 18 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,347 03 

Income from investments . . 2,815 17 

Miscellaneous .... 638 54 

Total current receipts . . $5,740 92 

Loans to income . . . 1,528 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 199 89 



$7,468 81 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,191 90 

150 89 

3,389 06 

663 35 

385 12 
1,486 96 



$7,267 28 
201 53 

$7,468 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$22,000; value of investments, $77,000. 



FALL RIVER WOMEN'S UNION, 101 Rock St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1887.) 

Report for year ending January 2, 1916. 

Mrs. J. M. Morton, Jr., President; Mrs. Edward S. Adams, 
Secretary; Miss Annie E. Allen, Treasurer; Mrs. Sarah B. Buffin- 
ton, Superintendent of House; Miss Florence A. Ritcher, Superin- 
tendent of Social Work. 

A building for girls' clubs; classes in cooking, sewing gymna- 
sium and restaurant. Provides lodging for women of limited 
means. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 
Renting rooms . 
Renting halls 
Entertainment . 
From restaurant 
Miscellaneous . 



$488 00 

1,576 79 

2,314 53 

48 00 

350 62 

117 74 

192 12 



Total current receipts . . $5,087 80 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 916 36 






$6,004 16 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $2,043 84 


Printing, postage and office s 


up- 


plies .... 


44 79 


Supplies . . 


449 49 


Heat, light and power 


. 1,446 63 


Repairs .... 


203 55 


Water .... 


143 95 


Insurance . . . 


302 55 


Social work 


154 86 


Board of employees . 


873 50 


Miscellaneous 


163 01 


Total current expenses 


. $5,826 17 


Cash on hand 


177 99 




$6,004 16 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $32,595.09. 



178 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



FRANCISCAN MISSIONARIES OF MARY OF FALL RIVER, 621 Second 
St., Fall River. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Rt. Rev. Daniel F. Feehan, President; Alice Whealan, Secre- 
tary; Anna Jacques, Treasurer; Antonia Barreto, Superior. 

Industrial school for girls ; visiting and aiding the poor; assisting 
and caring for discharged female prisoners. 

Number aided during year, 792; number of families aided, 312. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,324 30 

Miscellaneous .... 1,994 81 



Total curreDt receipts . . $3,319 11 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 315 21 



$3,634 32 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Payment on property 
Miscellaneous . 

Total currerjt expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,434 58 
467 65 
126 81 

300 00 
500 00 
311 04 

$3,140 08 
494 24 

$3,634 32 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000. 

HEBREW LADIES AID ASSOCIATION, Pearl St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1899.) 

Report for year ending January 5, 1916. 

Mrs. Sarah Packer, President; Mrs. Anna Goldberg, Secretary; 
Mrs. Ida Weinstein, Treasurer. 

To help the poor and needy of the Hebrew faith. 
Number of families aided, 269. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
From recital 

Total current receipts 
Loans to income . 



$419 02 
51 25 

$470 27 
48 48 



$518 75 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Rent 

To beneficiaries .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$42 23 

31 50 

444 27 

$518 00 
75 

$518 75 



HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, 1168 Highland Ave. , Fall River. (Incorporated 

1891.) 

Report for year ending January 15, 1916. 

Milton Reed, President; Louise L. Hathaway, Secretary; Ed- 
ward S. Adams, Treasurer; Mrs. Emeline G. Francis, Matron. 1 



Present matron, Mrs. Fanny Reynolds. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



179 



To care for aged men and women of good character, not less 
than sixty-eight years of age, who have resided in Fall River ten 
years. Entrance fee, $250, and transfer of property. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 28. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 


$1,352 45 
1,815 67 
6,623 59 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat and light 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ....... 

Insurance . 

Interest . 

Miscellaneous '. 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . . . . 


$3,390 37 
3,472 40 
1,222 01 


Total current receipts . 
Bequests .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 


$9,791 71 
19,095 45 

655 52 


397 35 

201 91 

95 43 

559 56 




$9,339 03 

19,601 80 

601 85 




$29,542 68 


$29,542 68 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $158,045.72. 



RESCUE MISSION OF FALL RIVER, 43-49 Fourth St., Fall River. (In- 
corporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Willard H. Poole, President; William A. Hart, Secretary; Ralph 
W. Arthur, Treasurer; John Chadwick, Superintendent. 

To furnish material and spiritual aid to unfortunate or vicious 
men and provide them with temporary lodgings and food until 
work can be had. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 18,588, viz., 17,154 partly paying, 
1,434 free; families aided, 20. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $768 75 
Miscellaneous .... 9,403 61 



Total current receipts . . $10,172 36 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 51 23 



$10,223 59 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,061 25 

20 25 

848 28 

2,160 00 

464 76 

24 49 
3,622 19 



$10,201 22 
22 37 

$10,223 59 



ISO 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



SEASIDE HOME OP FALL RIVER, 9 Riverview St., Fall River. (Incor- 
porated 1896.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Robert Marshall, President; Frank A. Pease, Secretary; Arthur 
P. Brayton, Treasurer; Miss E. G. Eddy, Superintendent. 
Care of sick babies during summer months. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$10 00 
62 55 

$72 55 
245 33 



$317 88 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 
Insurance ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$4 25 
131 25 
106 00 

$241 50 
76 38 

$317 88 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
),000; value of investments, $1,182.36. 



ST. ANNE'S HOSPITAL CORPORATION, 795 Middle St., Fall River. 

(Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mother Marguerite Philippe, President and Superior; Sister 
Ernestine Bourroux, Secretary; Sister Madeleine Lesage, Treasurer. 

A hospital for the sick and disabled. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 33 (including 7 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 532; number of 
free patients, 25; total number of hospital days during year, 
12,768. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $19,737 14 

Voluntary contributions . . 606 56 

Miscellaneous . . . . 25 75 

Total hospital receipts . . $20,369 45 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,378 94 



$21,748 39 



Cr. 
General house and property ex- 
penses . . . . 
Miscellaneous . . . . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$18,973 50 
29 07 

$19,002 57 
2,745 82 



$21,748 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$115,000. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



181 



ST. JOSEPH'S ORPHANAGE, 56 Bassett St., Fall River. (Incorporated 

1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. D. F. Feehan, President; C. A. Casgrain, M.D., Sec- 
retary; Sister St. Therese de Jesus, Treasurer; Rt. Rev. J. A. 
Prevost, Superintendent; Sister St. Mathilde, Superior. 

Care and education of orphans and destitute children (boys and 
girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 307, viz., 60 paying, 185 partly 
paying, 62 free; families aided, 5. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $22,125 74 

Subscriptions and donations . 2,387 39 

Income from investments . . 1,145 30 

Miscellaneous .... 1,619 40 



Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$27,277 83 
19,225 00 



460 74 



$46,963 57 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
New addition . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$4,558 80 

408 03 
9,720 59 

913 65 
1,543 46 



1,038 24 
421 90 


$18,604 67 

23,722 13 

4,500 00 

136 77 



$46,963 57 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$135,000; mortgage on same, $10,000. 



ST. VINCENT'S HOME CORPORATION OF FALL RIVER, 2860 North 
Main St., Fall River. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Daniel F. Feehan, President; Rev. Thomas A. Kelly, 
Secretary; Rev. Charles A. Donovan, Treasurer and Superintend- 
ent. 

Care of orphans and neglected children (boys and girls) be- 
tween the ages of five and fourteen. (Not taken from New Bed- 
ford.) 

Number of paid officers or employees, 12. 

Number aided during year, 250, viz., 39 paying, 30 partly pay- 
ing, 181 free. 



182 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$2,132 45 
14,239 93 



$16,372 38 



10,511 44 



$26,883 82 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Insurance 
Entertainments 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,013 00 

1,447 22 
8,746 78 
1,604 57 

12,019 33 

■ 310 84 

1,046 53 

111 71 

$26,299 98 
583 84 

$26,883 82 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$76,000. 



THE UNION HOSPITAL IN FALL RIVER, 538 Prospect St., Fall River. 

(Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

W. Frank Shove, President; Charles B. Chase, Secretary; 
George P. Brown, Treasurer; Anna E. E. Rothrock, R.N., 
Superintendent. 

Relief of the sick and injured and the education of nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 75 (including 43 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,641; number 
of free patients, 229; total number of hospital days during year, 
23,739; number of free days, 3,620; total number of visits in 
out-patient department during year, 26,068. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest, dividends aDd rentals 
Nurses' supplies and board 

Total hospital receipts . 
Net decrease in investments 

Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$60,149 05 

20 00 

5,657 14 

691 00 

$66,517 19 
2,321 83 

$68,839 02 

3,512 46 



$72,351 48 



Cr. 



Salaries .... 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex 



Social service . 
Uncollectable bill3 
Overseer of new work 

Total hospital expenses 
Depreciation . 



Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$11,012 71 
7,089 96 
4,968 46 

35,952 83 

480 00 

2,293 81 

280 00 



$62,077 77 
4,000 00 



$66,077 77 
6,273 71 

$72,351 48 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$195,009.82; value of investments, $136,191.19. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



183 



FlTCHBURG. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF FlTCHBURG, 336 Main St., Fitchburg. 

(Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending September 11, 1916. 

Richard B. Lyon, President; Mrs. C. W. Godfrey, Secretary; 
Ebenezer Bailey, Treasurer. 

To perform any work of charity or- philanthropy that may be 
needed in the city of Fitchburg. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of families aided, 336. ♦ 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,770 40 

Income from investments . . 130 82 

Rent .... . . 48 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 82 39 

Total current receipts . . $3,031 61 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 668 60 



$3,700 21 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,208 50 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 364 01 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,616 20 

Rent 88 00 

Board and care of children . . 163 35 

Miscellaneous . . . . 155 00 

Total current expenses . . $3,595 06 

Cash on hand .... 105 15 

$3,700 21 



Value of investments, $3,100. 



BURBANK HOSPITAL, off Nichols St., Fitchburg. (Incorporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Hon. Marcus A. Coolidge, Chairman; Wilbur W. Henry, Clerk 
and Treasurer; Miss Josephine E. Thurlow, Superintendent. 

General hospital for all diseases. Patients taken without re- 
gard to color, nationality, race or creed. Also tuberculosis hos- 
pital, under direction of board of health. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 78 (including 26 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,822; number 
of free patients, 185; total number of hospital days during year, 
35,634; number of free days, 2,441. 






1S4 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



Dr. 
City of Fitchburg, appropriation 
Board and care of patieDts 
Income from investments . 
Radiographs and laboratory 
Tuberculosis patients 
Farm products 
Free bed 
Rents 

Woman's club . 
Services of nurses 
From funds 
Sale of lumber 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
From savings bank . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



Cr. 



$24,500 00 


Salaries and wages . 


$24,632 24 


25,789 63 


Provisions, including value of 




12,048 58 


farm products 


25,599 36 


4,977 40 


Fuel, light, heat, power, includ- 




3,567 98 


ing labor .... 


8,412 43 


1,364 05 


Medical and surgical supplies 


4,427 51 


250 00 


Printing, stationery, telephone 




70 00 


and office supplies 


848 39 


30 00 


Ambulance, repairs and use of 




17 85 


police ambulance . 


1,457 12 


554 82 


Housekeeping supplies, repairs, 




11 05 


etc. ..... 


3,593 13 


2,959 09 


Insurance and surety bonds 


717 94 




Books and newspapers 


229 65 




$76,140 45 


Commissions on collections 


585 07 


1,000 00 


Repairs and maintenance of 






buildings, including labor 


4,480 27 


1,059 15 


Sorenson compressor (tuber- 






culosis hospital) 


120 00 




Line fence . . 


45 32 




Lumbering account . 


21 63 


* 


Miscellaneous .... 
Total current expenses . 


392 33 




$75,562 39 




Securities purchased 


1,032 50 




Savings bank, income special 






funds ..... 


74 82 




Cash on hand .... 


1,529 89 


$78,199 60 


$78,199 60 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$251,751.52; value of investments, $333,800.35. 



FITCHBURG HELPING HAND ASSOCIATION, 35 Holt St., Fitchburg. 

(Incorporated 1898.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Mrs. William H. Bennett, President; Miss Katherine D. 
Hewins, Secretary; Mrs. Myrtie L. Gove, Treasurer; Miss J. N. 
Macdonald, Superintendent 

Home for working girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 64, viz., 57 paying, 6 partly paying, 
1 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Associate members . , . 
Card and dancing party . 


. $11,075 61 

555 00 

48 00 

136 25 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental 

pairs .... 
Insurance 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


. $3,349 75 

9 30 

5,575 51 

1,680 55 

re- 

1,229 84 
37 80 


Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning 


. $11,814 86 
of 

74 91 


year .... 


. $11,882 75 
7 02 




$11,889 77 


$11,889 77 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 

$68,800. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



185 



FITCHBURG HOME FOR OLD LADIES, 14 Cedar St., Fitchburg. (In- 
corporated 1883.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Dr. William H. Bennett, President; Miss Edith B. Baker, Sec- 
retary; Warner M. Allen, Treasurer; Susie C. Stanley, Matron. 

Home for Protestant women, sixty-five years of age, residents 
of Fitchburg for ten years. Admission fee, $400, and conveyance 
of property to Home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 14. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From special inmates' funds 
Legacy .... 
Bequest .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts 
Investment repaid 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



$53 00 

3,794 14 

272 90 

5,279 29 

1,000 00 

14 60 



$10,413 93 
1,000 00 



15,068 97 



$26,482 90 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Taxes and expense on real estate 
Telephone 
Treasurer's bond 
Care of grounds and heater 
Nurses .... 
Inmates' special interest . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Notes and interest . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$1,343 88 
1,491 41 

148 43 

149 08 
423 09 

22 29 

25 00 
143 05 

55 50 
200 07 

86 12 



$4,087 92 
4,069 01 
5,000 00 

13,325 97 

$26,482 90 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$26,000; value of investments, $65,090.88. 



FITCHBURG UNION AID HOME FOR CHILDREN, 47 Holt St., Fitchburg. 

(Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Milton L. Cushing, President; Mrs. H. E. Jennison, Secretary; 
Clifton S. Hadley, Treasurer; Mrs. Abbie E. Demmon, Matron. 

To assist poor and needy children of Fitchburg without restric- 
tion of race, color or creed (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 45, viz., 10 paying, 20 partly pay- 
ing, 15 free. 



1S6 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $733 70 

Subscriptions and donations . 884 50 

Bequest 1,000 00 

Income from investments . . 221 53 



Total current receipts . . $2,839 73 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 5,819 88 



$8,659 61 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,203 00 

8 35 
571 63 
294 26 

127 37 
124 78 

$2,329 39 
6,330 22 

$8,659 61 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$11,150. 

Fkamingham. 

FRAMINGHAM HOSPITAL, Evergreen St., Framingham. (Incorporated 

1890.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

John M. Merriam, President; Leonard C. Bigelow, Secretary; 
Fred L. Oaks, Treasurer; Miss Grace Heatley, Superintendent. 

To maintain a hospital for the sick and to conduct a training 
school for nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 78 (including 55 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,219; number 
of free patients, 107; total number of hospital days during year, 
16,750; number of free days, 860; total number of visits in out- 
patient department during year, 236. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 
Nurses' services . . • 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . 



$27,726 59 
1,743 53 
4,664 96 
1.622 35 
3,254 02 
795 95 

$39,807 40 

679 41 

$40,486 81 



Cr. 

Administration . . . $3,511 90 
Department expenses . . 29,392 69 
General house and property ex- 
penses . . . . 6,522 86 

Total hospital expenses . . $39,427 45 

Cash on hand .... 1,059 36 



$40,486 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$60,000; value of investments, $43,500.38. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



187 



HEBREW LADIES' AID SOCIETY OP FRAMINGHAM, 5 Waverley St., 
South Framingham. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending September 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Rose Silverman, President; Mrs. J. Franklin, Secretary; 
Mrs. J. Winer, Treasurer. 

To aid needy families and individuals. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 3 individuals, 7 families. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Rental of part of house 



. $30 00 
. 204 00 



$234 00 » 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office supplies $5 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 100 00 

Rent 17 00 

Heat, light and power . . . 80 00 



$202 00 : 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$2,500; amount of mortgage on same, $1,200; value of invest- 
ments, $500. 



HOME FOR AGED MEN AND WOMEN IN FRAMINGHAM, corner 
Worcester and Pleasant Sts., Framingham. (Incorporated 1886.) 

Report for year ending January 15, 1916. 

Mrs. Nathaniel I. Bowditch, President; Miss Ellen Hyde, Sec- 
retary; John H. Temple, Treasurer; Miss Alice M. Bacon, Matron. 

To furnish a home for indigent persons at least sixty years of 
age, residents of Framingham for at least ten years. Admission 
fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 16. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Bequests to income . 
Income from investments . 

Total "current receipts 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$1,601 00 
2,052 14 
3,500 00 
2,101 28 

$9,254 42 
513 29 

515 50 



$10,283 21 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $1,933 10 


Printing, postage and office sup 




plies .... 


22 75 


Provisions and supplies 


1,455 83 


Insurance . . . 


55 44 


Heat, light and power 


868 91 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


99 18 


Telephone 


38 58 


Funeral expenses 


60 00 


Inmates' allowances 


118 50 


Outside laundry 


53 25 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$4,705 54 

5,110 78 

466 89 

$10,283 21 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$30,000; value of investments, $32,291.26. 



Accounts do not balance. 



1S8 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Gardner. 

GARDNER HOME FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE, 162 Pearl St., Gardner. (In- 
corporated 1896.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Euclid L. Brooks, President; Edward P. Noyes, Secretary; Alec 
E. Knowlton, Treasurer; O. C. Lord, Superintendent; Mrs. O. C. 
Lord, Matron. 

Permanent home for elderly Protestant persons, natives of the 
United States, and at least sixty-five years of age. Admission 
fee, $150. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 6. 



Dr. 
Bequests . . . .'• . $3,357 21 

Income from investments . . 3,640 32 



Total current receipts . . $6,997 53 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 410 19 



$7,407 72 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$819 52 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


10 01 


Provisions and supplies 


793 48 


Insurance and taxes . 


621 07 


Heat, light and water 


373 02 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


364 39 


Medical attendance . 


36 90 


Telephone 


18 91 


Attorney's fees . 


73 40 


Miscellaneous 


30 00 



Total current expenses 
Invested . ... 

Cash on hand . 



$3,140 70 

3,974 62 

292 40 

$7,407 72 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $78,699.44. 



THE HENRY HEY WOOD MEMORIAL HOSPITAL, Green St., Gardner. 

(Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

John D. Edgell, President; Miss Helen R. Heywood, Secretary 
and Treasurer; Miss Marietta D. Barnaby, Superintendent. 

Hospital purposes. No restrictions as to age, sex, color, na- 
tionality or creedc Residents of Gardner have precedence as free 
patients. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 37. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 844; number of 
free patients, 34; total number of hospital days during year, 
10,241; number of free days, 524. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



189 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $21,457 34 

Payments by city, town or State 854 44 

Voluntary contributions . . 12,000 00 

Interest, dividends and rentals 12,385 51 

Miscellaneous .... 106 83 

Total receipts . . . $46,804 12 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,674 68 



$48,478 80 



Cr. 
Administration . . 

Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 



Miscellaneous . 

Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$21,090 44 
13,440 48 

11,291 31 
333 44 

$46,155 67 
2,323 13 



$48,478 80 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$100,000; value of investments, $409,200. 



Georgetown. 

CARLETON HOME, TRUSTEES OP THE, North St., Georgetown. (In- 
corporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Edward A. Chaplin, President; Lawrence L. Chaplin, Secretary; 
Harry E. Perkins, Treasurer; Mary J. Terry, Matron. 

Home for the poor of both sexes, at least seventy years of age. 
Admission fee not less than $100. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 4. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous . 



$31 00 

1,696 21 

84 



Total current receipts . . $1,728 05 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 269 55 



$1,997 60 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$457 23 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies 


5 20 


Provisions and supplies . 


332 97 


Heat, light and power 


152 30 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


39 86 


Insurance ..... 


43 56 


Taxes ..... 


97 25 


Miscellaneous .... 


73 43 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$1,201 80 

769 31 

26 49 

$1,997 60 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$2,800; value of investments, $37,307.42. 



Gloucester. 

ADDISON GILBERT HOSPITAL, 298 Washington St., Gloucester. (In- 
corporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending January 1, 1916. 

Fred A. Barker, President; Fred A. Shackelford, Secretary; 
Horace A. Smith, Treasurer; Julia M. Leach, Superintendent. 



190 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



To furnish medical and surgical aid to inhabitants of Glouces- 
ter and others, according to the will of the late Addison Gilbert. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 27 (including 15 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 420; number of 
free patients, 32; total number of hospital days during year, 
5,960; number of free days, 829; total number of visits in out- 
patient department during year, about 250. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Patients' payments . 


$10,952 54 


Administration 


. $8,551 50 


Payments by city, town or State 


446 50 


Professional care of patients 


59 00 


Voluntary contributions . 


700 00 


Department expenses 


1,821 85 


Interest, dividends and rentals . 


14,484 32 


General house and property ex- 




Notes ..... 


5,500 00 


penses . 


8,149 45 


Miscellaneous . 


34 66 


Corporation expenses 


2,171 50 






Light and heating 


2,312 27 






Total hospital receipts . 


$32,118 02 


Interest on notes 


859 63 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Repairs .... 


6,262 30 


year . . 


58 18 


Taxes .... 


1,118 75 






Insurance 


435 44 






Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 


370 21 




$32,111 90 






Cash on hand . 


64 30 




$32,176 20 


$32,176 20 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$79,000; value of investments, $282,696.43. 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF GLOUCESTER, Dale Ave., Gloucester. 

(Incorporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending October 30, 1916. 

Fred A. Shackelford, President; Walter C. King, Secretary; 
Edward Dolliver, Treasurer; Lucy Lawrence, Registrar. 
To help others to help themselves. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number of families aided during year, 172. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $286 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 240 40 

Income from investments . . 10 10 

Thanksgiving contribution . . 29 83 

Chisholm fund . . . 760 92 

Miscellaneous . . . . 61 90 

Total current receipts . . $1,389 15 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 451 43 



$1,840 58 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Telephone 
Chisholm fund . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$462 19 

159 65 
34 60 

729 55 
25 40 



$1,411 39 
429 19 

$1,840 58 



Value of investments, $7,250. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



191 



THE GILBERT HOME FOR AGED AND INDIGENT PERSONS, 1 Western 
Ave., Gloucester. (Incorporated 1889.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Fred A. Shackelford, President; Daniel T. Babson, Secretary 
and Treasurer; Martha A. Tuck, Matron. 

Home for indigent women at least sixty years of age, citizens 
or inhabitants of the city of Gloucester. Admission fee, $300. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 9. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . 
Income from investments 



$399 00 
4,014 41 



Total current receipts . . $4,413 41 

Investments paid . . . 8,208 28 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 2,819 58 



$15,441 27 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses * 
Income invested 
New investments 
Cash on hand . 



$1,248 20 

1,281 00 

370 53 



553 44 
252 38 


$3,705 55 

790 10 

8,933 93 

2,011 69 



$15,441 27 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$9,030.53; value of investments, $87,059.44. 



GLOUCESTER DISTRICT NURSING ASSOCIATION, Gloucester Bank 
Building, Main St., Gloucester. (Incorporated 1914.) 

Report for fourteen months ending January 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Alice C. Babson, President; Mabel L. Andrews, Recording 
Secretary; Mrs. Hanna V. P. Merchant, Treasurer. 

To provide skilled nursing, to teach hygiene and to co-operate 
with other organizations in promoting health in the city of 
Gloucester. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 



Dr. 



Memberships 


. $384 50 


Subscriptions and donations 


176 45 


Patients' fees 


200 85 


Metropolitan fees 


1,264 70 


From entertainments . 


1,632 44 


Interest 


16 67 


Rebates .... 


31 46 



Total current receipts . . $3,707 07 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,872 94 



$5,580 01 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Special nurse 
Printing, postage and office 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 

Heat, light and power 
Telephone 

Office cleaning and laundry 
Carfares . 

Carting and express . 
Expense of entertainments 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



sup- 



$3,504 22 
94 20 

287 14 

240 48 

140 00 

13 79 

59 58 

51 56 

109 18 

9 04 

685 58 



$5,194 77 
385 24 

$5,580 01 



192 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



GLOUCESTER FEMALE CHARITABLE ASSOCIATION, Dale Ave., 
Gloucester. (Incorporated 1872.) 

Report for year ending January 31, 1916. 

Mrs. William H. Jordan, President; Mrs. Joseph O. Proctor, 
Secretary; Miss Sarah G. Rowe, Treasurer. 
Rendering aid to worthy poor. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number of families aided, 162. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $52 00 

Income from investments . . 1,272 02 

Income from various funds held 

in trust .... 1,861 86 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand . 



$3,185 88 
2,065 73 



$5,251 61 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent ..... 

Furnishings and incidental re- 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$225 00 

8 90 

2,894 63 

60 00 

69 05 

. $3,257 58 
. 1,994 03 

$5,251 61 



Value of investments, $19,890.44. 



GLOUCESTER FISHERMAN'S INSTITUTE, Duncan St., Gloucester. 

(Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles F. Wonson, President; John J. Pew, Secretary; Orlando 
Merchant, Treasurer; Henry Parsons, Chaplain. 

For improving the condition of fishermen and seamen. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,284 88 

Income from investments . . 1,855 00 

Miscellaneous .... 2,642 19 



Total current receipts . . $6,782 07 

Cash on haDd at beginning of year 1,078 00 



$7,860 07 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 

Miscellaneous . . . . 1,631 93 



$2,688 92 

250 00 
671 13 

75 00 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$5,316 98 
1,509 67 
1,033 42 

$7,860 07 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$12,000; value of investments, $47,633.42. 



Part II. 



CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



193 



GLOUCESTER FISHERMEN'S AND SEAMEN'S WIDOWS' AND ORPHANS' 
AID SOCIETY, Gloucester. (Incorporated 1865.) 

Report for year ending February 1, 1916. 

Sylvanus Smith, President; John J. Pew, Secretary and Treas- 
urer. 

To help sick Gloucester fishermen, and the widows and chil- 
dren of those lost at sea. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of families aided, 88. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 



$419 20 
3,364 76 



$3,783 96 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies . 

Cash and fuel . 

Rent 

To trustees, Gloucester Safe De- 
posit and Trust Company 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . - . 



$250 00 

2 25 

2,832 64 
50 00 

172 75 

. $3,307 64 
476 32 

$3,783 96 



Value of investments, $72,413.14. 



HUNTRESS HOME, 110 Prospect St., Gloucester. (Incorporated 1900.) 

- Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Hon. Charles H. Barrett, President; John J. Somes, Secretary; 
Edward Dolliver, Treasurer; Lydia A. Marston, Matron. 

Home for old ladies over sixty years of age, natives of Glouces- 
ter. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 

Number aided during year, 11. 



Dr. 

Admission fees .... $400 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 260 00 

Income from investments . . 2,008 37 

Refund 5 00 

Total current receipts . . $2,673 37 

Loans to income . . . 28 03 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 594 96 



$3,296 36 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Milk .... 

New England Telephone and 
Telegraph Company 

Water .... 

Nurse .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 



$716 00 
966 57 
518 65 

238 36 
146 40 

35 41 

50 00 
288 00 
136 97 



$3,096 36 
200 00 

$3,296 36 



Value of investments, $27,200. 



194 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



WILLIAM LAWRENCE CAMP, INC., Stanwood Point, East Gloucester. 

(Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Elizabeth A. Mason, President; Phillips Ketchum, Secretary; 
Charles E. Mason, Treasurer; Stanton H. King, Superintendent. 

To provide camping grounds for members of church organiza- 
tions. 

Number aided during year, 350, all partly paying. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Rent .... 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$40 00 
281 00 

$321 00 
73 59 



$394 59 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Interest on mortgage . 
Water tax ..... 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$6 56 
60 05 
66 00 
30 00 
17 77 
23 44 



$203 82 
190 77 

$394 59 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $2,000; amount of mortgage on same, $1,100. 

WOMEN'S CLUBHOUSE ASSOCIATION OF MAGNOLIA, Shore Rd. 
(Magnolia), Gloucester. (Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending November 1, 1916. 

Dennis C. Ballou, President; Rev. Walter S. Eaton, Secretary; 
Ethel P. May Wilkinson, Treasurer; Mrs. Pickles, Matron. 

To furnish a meeting place, entertainment facilities and lodging 
to women employed in Magnolia during the summer at the hotels 
and summer residences. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of members, 109. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Room rent and season's dues 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$152 78 
624 10 



$776 S8 
58 24 



$835 12 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat and light . 
Furnishings and incidental repairs 
Laundry and water 
Telephone and music . 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$335 00 

15 97 

5 56 

123 19 

197 36 

55 45 

33 34 

42 10 



$807 97 
27 15 

$835 12 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,565.11. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



195 



Gkeat Barrington. 
FAIRVIEW HOSPITAL, West Ave., Great Barrington. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

John H. C. Church, President; Harry Douglas, Secretary; 
George H. Read, Treasurer; Miss Mary J. Flynn, Superintendent. 

At present emergency cases only are taken. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 160; number of 
free patients, 4; total number of hospital days during year, 275. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 



$5,761 99 
1,016 56 
2,600 00 

$9,378 55 



Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . . 2,190 98 



$11,569 53 



Cr. 

Department expenses . . $2,976 10 
General house and property ex- 
penses .... 7,013 64 



Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$9,989 74 
1,579 79 



$11,569 53 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $53,512.50. 



Greenfield. 

FRANKLIN COUNTY PUBLIC HOSPITAL, corner High and Sanderson 
Sts., Greenfield. (Incorporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Eugene B. Blake, President; Miss Eliza B. Leonard, Secretary; 
Frank J. Lawler, Treasurer; Anna M. Sweeney, Superintendent. 

Care of sick and injured persons and the training of nurses. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 36 (including 20 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 737; number of 
free patients, 34; total number of hospital days during year, 
14,655; number of free days, 811. 

Cr. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, dividends and rentals 
Unrestricted legacies 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
.year .... 



$19,291 51 

2,144 99 

1,569 94 

443 08 

1,070 00 

18 50 






$24,538 02 
02 

$29,538 04 



Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex 

penses 
Equipment 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Deficit .... 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$1,724 63 

6,564 23 

16,149 04 

544 04 

681 24 

37 37 

$25,700 55 

2,077 39 

1,070 00 

690 10 

$29,538 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$80,000; value of investments, $14,454.80. 



196 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Greenwich. 
HILLSIDE SCHOOL, Greenwich Village. (Incorporated 1907.) 

Report for year ending June 25, 1916. 

Franklin P. Shumway, President; Mrs. Mary E. Warren, Secre- 
tary; Miss B. B. Lord, Treasurer; Mr. and Mrs. James B. Taylor, 
Superintendent and Matron. 

A Christian industrial school for homeless, orphan and neg- 
lected boys. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 43, viz., 10 paying, 
28 partly paying, 5 free; outside institution, 11, all partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
From farm .... 
Concerts, horse show, etc. 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts . 
Sale of stock .... 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 



S4.330 81 

3,559 74 

954 68 

2,075 50 

191 17 

$11,111 90 

941 25 

539 24 



$12,592 39 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$3,580 15. 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies .... 


697 11 


Provisions and supplies 


3,337 80 


Surveyor 


112 00 


Heat, light and power 


152 21 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs .... 


794 13 


Insurance 


407 81 


Implements 


239 00 


Express and freight . 


139 82 


Miscellaneous . 


431 60 


Total current expenses . 


. $9,891 73 


New buildings 


690 00 


Painting buildings 


949 91 


Water system . 


810 57 


Cash on hand . 


250 18 




$12,592 39 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,000. 



Hanson. 

MASSACHUSETTS BRANCH OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORDER OF THE 
KING'S DAUGHTERS AND SONS (GORDON REST), corner Indian 
Head and Maquan Sts., Hanson. (Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. M. Wheatie Farley, President; Miss Susan R. Broken- 
shire, Treasurer. 

Summer vacation home for working women and girls. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Number aided during summer, about 250; about 230 paying 
and 20 free. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



197 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Repairs .... 
Interest .... 
Miscellaneous . 



$1,916 12 

555 05 

913 89 

28 99 

69 02 



Total current receipts . . $3,483 07 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 296 40 



$3,779 47 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Insurance 
Heat and hay 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Laundry .... 
Hanson fire department 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Interest .... 
Cash on hand . 



$635 68 

78 55 

1,647 03 

23 65 

34 00 

904 26 

121 55 

15 00 

26 78 



$3,486 50 

28 99 
263 98 

$3,779 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$4,500; value of investments, $410.41. 



Haverhill. 

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OP HAVERHILL, 50 Merrimack St., Haverhill. 

(Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Dr. Francis W. Anthony, President; Lillian B. Woodbury, Sec- 
retary; Edward R. Hale, Treasurer. 

To secure the concurrent and harmonious action of the differ- 
ent charities of Haverhill, raise the poor above the need of relief 
and diminish pauperism. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 792; number of families dealt with, 
246. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Loan .... 



$1,160 05 
v 200 00 



Total current receipts . . $1,360 05 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 5 67 



$1,365 72 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental r& 

pairs .... 
Emergency aid . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$716 70 

65 07 

203 88 

160 00 

6 00 

50 45 

84 50 



$3,286 60 
79 12 

$1,365 72 



Value of investments, $125. 



198 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



HALE HOSPITAL, Buttonwoods Ave., Haverhill. (Incorporated 1888.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Albert L. Bartlett, President; C. Archie Home, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Emma A. Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Medical and surgical treatment. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 54 (including 28 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 950; number of 
free patients, 245; total number of hospital days during year, 
16,704; number of free days, 4,808. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $25,375 15 

Payments by city, town or State 8,273 27 

Voluntary contributions . . 778 10 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 3,972 93 

Miscellaneous .... 1,342 35 



Total hospital receipts 
Loans to income 



$39,741 80 
6,286 51 

$46,028 31 



Cr. 

Administration 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
General house and property ex- 
penses 



$3,779 66 

9,445 89 

23,915 30 

8,887 46 



$46,028 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$166,785.31; value of investments, $82,691.22. 



HAVERHILL BOYS' CLUB ASSOCIATION, 11 Washington St., Haverhill. 

(Incorporated 1906.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Ransom C. Pingree, President; Stanley D. Gray, Secretary; 
Albert L. Sawyer, Treasurer; Edward D. Bailey, Superintendent. 
A club for boys with limited opportunities. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 1,000. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . $83 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,240 83 

Income from investments . . 129 38 

Special donations . . 649 20 

Miscellaneous . . . ■ . 5 45 

Total current receipts . . $2,107 86 

Loans to income . . . 400 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 244 18 



$2,752 04 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Insurance 

Charity .... 

Industrial work 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Interest on loan 
Loan repaid . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,268 66 

28 33 

84 72 

487 50 

84 66 



14 25 

50 76 

140 55 

11 95 



$2,181 22 

6 75 

400 00 

164 07 

$2,752 04 



Value of investments, $38,907.33. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



199 



HAVERHILL CHILDREN'S AID SOCIETY, 50 Merrimack St., Haverhill. 

(Incorporated 1866.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Mrs. W. C. Lewis, President; Mrs. Greenleaf Clarke, Secretary; 
Miss Sarah M. Kelly, Treasurer; Mrs. Gertrude E. Merrill, Gen- 
eral Secretary. 

Care of destitute and homeless children. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number of children cared for in foster homes, 57; the society 
reimbursed for expense of these, exclusive of supervision: in full, 
11; in part, 18; not reimbursed, 28. Monthly average number of 
children under supervision in foster homes, 40. Number of plac- 
ing-out visitors, 2. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests 
Income from investments . 
Investments 
Miscellaneous . 



$1,670 06 
1,150 40 
1,200 00 
3,280 62 
1,100 00 
73 80 



Total current receipts . . $8,474 88 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 277 56 



$8,752 44 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Rent 

Heat, light and power 
Board of children 
Boots and shoes 
Clothing . 
Telephone 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Invested . . 

Cash on hand . 



$1,747 93 

83 66 

210 00 

9 13 

4,324 38 

172 34 

450 95 

50 96 

400 52 

$7,449 87 

1,200 00 

102 57 

$8,752 44 



Value of investments, $70,650.55. 



HAVERHILL FEMALE BENEVOLENT SOCIETY, City Hall, Main St., 
Haverhill. (Incorporated 1854.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. * 

M. Lizzie Holmes, President; Carolyn E. Wilson, Secretary; 
Eva F. Howes, Treasurer. 

To help the worthy poor of Haverhill. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 3. 
Number of families aided, 130. 



Dr. 

Donations 
Bequests to ircome 
Income from investments . 
Yearly dues 


$20 00 
250 00 

. 1,402 02 
53 00 

. 2,583 28 


Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Interest .... 

Total current expenses . 
Legacy deposited 
Cash on hand . 


. $400 00 

. 2,495 20 

178 84 


E. H. Howes, trustee 


. $3,074 04 

250 00 

. 1,104 08 


Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of y 


. $4,308 30 
ear 119 82 




$4,428 12 


$4,428 12 



Value of investments, $105,530.35. 



200 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



OLD LADIES' HOME ASSOCIATION, 119 Main St., Haverhill. (Incor- 
porated 1856.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Miss Caroline D. Cogswell, President; Mrs. Jennie W. Inger- 
soll, Secretary; Mrs. Myra R. Jones, Treasurer; Miss Hattie M. 
Smith, Matron. 

Home for worthy American women at least seventy years of 
age, residents of Haverhill for the ten years previous to admit- 
tance. Admission fee, $200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 24. 



Dr. 



From beneficiaries 


$25,500 82 


Salaries and wages . 


. $2,921 29 


Subscriptions and donations 


433 00 


Provisions and supplies 


2,359 17 


Annuities and bequests to income 


29 63 


Burial expense 


199 00 


Income from investments . 


5,600 37 


Heat, light and power 


787 79 


Membership dues 


286 00 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




Rebate from State . 


42 70 


pairs .... 


1,176 64 


Miscellaneous . 


193 96 


Water, ice, laundry and tele- 








phone .... 


168 17 






Total current receipts . 


$32,086 48 


Insurance and taxes 


361 77 


Cash on hand at beginning of 




Clothing 


48 78 


year ..... 


2,853 70 


Medical attendance . 


298 55 






Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 


307 09 




. $8,628 25 






Depreciation charged off . 


6,524 00 






Income invested 


. 19,664 99 






Cash on hand . 


122 94 




$34,940 18 


$34,940 18 



Cr. 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,000; value of investments, $134,965.75. 



YOUNG WOMEN'S BUILDING ASSOCIATION, 64 Pecker St., Haverhill. 

(Incorporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Anna M. M. Brooks, President; Miss Anna M. Pearl, Sec- 
retary; Mrs. Elizabeth W. Barker, Treasurer; Mrs. Fannie L. 
Head, Matron. 

To support a day nursery; to maintain the services of two 
district nurses and an employment bureau. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 5,880, viz., 4,930 
paying, 950 free; outside institution, 4,223, viz., 2,998 paying, 
1,225 free. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



201 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Dues and fees . 
Income from investments . 
District nursing and day nursery 



Working fund committee 
May supper 
Rummage sale . 
Concerts . 
Employment 
Miscellaneous . 



$800 00 

111 64 

274 35 

56 47 

1,909 60 

1,498 62 

165 85 

102 00 

160 75 

17 50 

14 66 



Total current receipts , . . $5,111 44 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,473 37 



$6,584 81 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs 

Taxes 

Laundry . 

Telephone 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,092 35 

15 60 

832 14 
199 16 

322 47 
5 36 

150 73 
46 90 
17 10 

$3,681 87 
2,902 94 



$6,584 81 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500. 

HOLDEN. 

HOLDEN VISITING NURSE ASSOCIATION, INC., Holden. (Incorporated 

1915.) 

Report for year ending May 1, 1916. 

Henry W. Warren, President; Miss Frances Chenery, Secretary; 
H. B. Hunt, Treasurer. 

To give home nursing to sick persons of the community. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 
Number aided during year, 103. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
For services of nurse in public 
schools ..... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$299 69 
382 13 



125 00 



$806 82 
433 89 



$1,240 71 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 

Provisions and supplies 
Transportation for nurse 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . . . . 



$850 00 

41 21 
36 38 
49 99 

$977 58 
263 13 

$1,240 71 



HOLYOKE. 

HOLYOKE BOYS' CLUB ASSOCIATION, 102 Race St., Holyoke. (Incor- 
porated 1904.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Frederick S. Webber, President; William A. Allyn, Secretary; 
Frank G. Willcox, Treasurer; George W. King, Superintendent. 

Providing for the social enjoyment and improvement of boys, 
and furnishing them with industrial training. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11 (including 4 part 
time). 

Number aided during year, approximately, 1,000. 



202 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $2,596 17 

Interest . . . . . 45 04 

Balance of rent on real estate . 602 86 

Total current receipts . . $3,244 07 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,217 60 



$4,461 67 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Miscellaneous 

Pathescope 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$2,552 20 
401 91 
238 00 

$3,192 11 
1,269 56 



$4,461 67 



Value of investments, $9,000. 



HOLYOKE CITY HOSPITAL, Beech St., Holyoke. (Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

William F. Whiting, President; George W. Prentiss, Secretary; 
Frank B. Towne, Treasurer; George D. Henderson, M.D., Super- 
intendent. 

For treating the sick at a low cost. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 76 (including 43 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,595; total 
number of hospital days during year, 19,072. 



• Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions 
Interest, dividends and rentals . 

Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . » 



$37,717 25 
4,477 90 
7,081 55 
4,629 37 

$53,906 07 

3 18 

$53,909 25 



Cr. 
Administration . . ' . $5,783 36 

Professional care of patients . 2,532 50 
General house and property ex- 
penses .... 43,772 30 



Total expenses 
Deficit for year 
Cash on hand . 



$52,088 16 

1,796 08 

25 01 

$53,909 25 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$155,000; value of investments, $100,727.68. 



HOLYOKE HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, Morgan St., Holyoke. (Incor- 
porated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Harriet C. Loomis, President; Miss Claudia Potter, Secre- 
tary; Florence D. Merrick, Treasurer; Mrs. Elizabeth Dunn, 
Matron. 

Home for women at least sixty-five years of age, residents of 
Holyoke. Admission fee, $500. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 24. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



203 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Miscellaneous . 



Total current receipts . 

Cash on hand at beginning 

year .... 



of 



$1,000 00 

1,973 79 

7,875 00 

3,512 35 

335 80 

$14,696 94 

921 51 



$15,618 45 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 



Burials, medicine, care, etc. 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



2,387 55 


30 


00 


1,855 


17 


1,083 


34 


368 


24 


428 47 


233 


50 


113 92 



$6,500 19 

8,360 78 

757 48 

$15,618 45 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$40,000; value of investments, $65,000. 



SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE (BEAVEN-KELLY HOME), Springfield Rd., 
Holyoke. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

lit. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary 
Agatha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Providence 
(Catherine Horan), Treasurer; Sister Mary Teresa, Superior. 

The care of aged and infirm men. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 64, viz., 52 paying, 4 partly pay- 
ing, 8 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$9,236 77 

568 58 

$9,805 35 
32 31 



$9,837 66 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$801 60 

85 90 
6,290 98 
1,911 96 

643 01 
63 39 

$9,796 84 
40 82 

$9,837 66 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$70,000; amount of mortgage on same, $30,000. 



SISTERS OP PROVIDENCE (BRIGHTSIDE ORPHANS' AND BETHLEHEM 
HOMES), Springfield Rd., Holyoke. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary Aga- 
tha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Providence, 
Treasurer; Mother Mary Vincent, General Superintendent. 



204 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



The care and education of boys, whether orphaned, destitute or 
otherwise needy; also an infant asylum. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 318, viz., 271 paying, 24 partly 
paying, 23 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . $26,631 46 

Subscriptions and donations . 5,534 42 

Total current receipts . . $32,165 88 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 154 11 



$32,319 99 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Interest .... 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 

Paid on mortgage 

Farm expenses 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$3,203 19 

65 12 

11,201 34 
3,850 00 
3,613 41 

2,345 39 

5,401 00 

2,050 69 

275 65 

$32,005 79 
314 20 

$32,319 99 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$125,000; mortgage on same, $75,850. 



SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE (HOUSE OF PROVIDENCE HOSPITAL AND 
FATHER HARKINS' HOME), 679 Dwight St., Holyoke. (Incor- 
porated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary 
Agatha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Provi- 
dence, Treasurer; Sister Mary Visitation, Superior. 

Care of medical, surgical and obstetrical cases. Care of aged 
and infirm women in the Father Harkins' Home, both being 
under same management. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 72. 

Number aided during year, 1,530, viz., 1,420 paying, 33 partly 
paying, 77 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $47,661 07 

Subscriptions and donations . 150 79 

Annuities and bequests to income 5,761 16 



Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$53,573 02 
724 16 



$54,297 18 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$5,484 82 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies . . . 


385 91 


Provisions and supplies 


18,219 62 


Insurance 


894 60 


Heat, light and power 


2,993 33 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


6,558 29 


Miscellaneous .... 


187 78 



Total current expenses . . $34,724 35 

Income invested in building fund 18,461 40 
Cash on hand .... 1,111 43 



$54,297 18 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



205 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $85,000. 



SISTERS OF PROVIDENCE (MT. ST. VINCENT HOME FOR GIRLS), 
Springfield Rd., Holyoke. (Incorporated 1892.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas D. Beaven, D.D., President; Sister Mary 
Agatha (Ellen McKenna), Secretary; Mother Mary of Provi- 
dence, Treasurer; Sister Mary Margaret, Superior. 

The care and education of orphaned or destitute girls from 
two to sixteen years. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 163, viz., 92 paying, 58 partly 
paying, 13 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from Sisters' industry . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$9,430 24 
413 61 
892 68 

$10,736 53 

445 17 



$11,181 70 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Farm expenses 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$1,133 00 

161 27 
5,572 66 
1,258 63 

1,847 27 

1,021 89 

73 68 

82 50 

$11,150 90 
30 80 

$11,181 70 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $65,000. 

Ipswich. 

COBURN CHARITABLE SOCIETY, North Main St., Ipswich. (Incor- 
porated 1910.) 

Report for year ending April 29, 1916. 

Malcolm Donald, Clerk and Treasurer; Martha J. Stewart, 
Matron and Visiting Nurse. 

To provide a home for needy and worthy persons, natives or 
residents of Ipswich, of both sexes, not under sixty years of age, 
and to supply the poor of Ipswich with medical attendance, 
nurses and medicines. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 6; outside institu- 
tion, 366, viz., 52 partly paying, 314 free. 



206 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



Cr. 



$112 01 


Salaries and wages 


$2,674 15 


8,087 52 


Printing, postage and office sup- 






plies .... 


25 20 




$8,190 53 


Provisions and supplies 


1,165 62 


1,380 02 


Insurance 


24 00 




Water and ice . 


50 42 




Treasurer's bond, auditor and safe 






deposit box 


106 63 




Heat and light . 


447 05 




Publication annual reports . 


260 09 




Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs 


231 68 




Medical attendance, medicines 






etc. . 


263 26 




Traveling expenses 


161 94 




Hospital expenses and outside 






assistance 


84 00 




Telephone 


59 15 




Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 


147 83 




$5,701 02 




Income invested 


1,198 90 




Cash on hand 


2,679 63 


$9,579 55 


$9,579 55 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $6,400; value of investments, $200,682.95. 



Lancastek. 

CHARITABLE FUND IN THE TOWN OF LANCASTER, TRUSTEES OF, 
Lancaster. (Incorporated 1851.) 

Report for year ending March 2, 1916. 

Otto E. Duerr, President; William H. Blood, Secretary and 
Treasurer. 
Aid to needy widows and spinsters, residents of Lancaster. 
Number aided during year, 21. 



Dr. 



Bequests 
Receipts . 



$12,030 69 
537 46 



Total current receipts . . $12,568 15 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 664 07 



$13,232 22 



Cr. 
Provisions and supplies 
Cash donations 

Total current expenses 
Invested 
Cash on hand . 



$47 00 
470 00 



$517 00 

12,030 69 

684 53 

$13,232 22 



Value of investments, $12,030.69. 



NATHANIEL THAYER PLAYGROUND ASSOCIATION, Lancaster. (In- 
corporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Mrs. Pauline R. Thayer, President; Miss Mary W. Bartol, 
Secretary; Dudley H. Dorr, Treasurer; Oscar A. Schmidt, 
Superintendent. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



207 



Providing healthful recreation, athletic exercise and instruc- 
tion in the more common and useful arts and sciences. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 

Number aided during year, 521, viz., 383 partly paying, 138 
free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Miscellaneous . . . 

Total current receipts 
Cash on band at beginning of year 



$308 80 

1,423 00 

13 42 

$1,745 22 
44 93 



$1,790 15 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Insurance 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$695 30 

13 47 

59 34 

239 86 

624 92 
82 51 
31 66 



$1,747 06 
43 09 

$1,790 15 



Lawrence. 

ARLINGTON DAY NURSEEY AND CHILDREN'S TEMPORARY HOME, 
19 Charles St., Lawrence. (Incorporated 1910.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. Helen M. Barker, President; Mrs. Margaret Hollows, 
Secretary; Miss Edith Goldsmith, Treasurer; Mrs. Mina Black, 
Matron. 

Care of children (boys and girls) by day or week. 

Number of paid employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 85, viz., 54 paying, 31 free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $589 99 

Board 2,160 15 

Entertainment . . . . 75 75 

Total current receipts . . $2,825 89 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 194 85 



$3,020 74 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .'.... 

Provisions and supplies 

Rent ....". 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . 

Telephone . 

Laundry . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .'.'.. 



$1,223 88 

3 90 

1,082 83 

154 00 

175 68 

245 55 
48 42 
65 09 
19 67 

$3,019 02 
1 72 

$3,020 74 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, 



208 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ASRATH NOSHIM, 184 Broadway, Lawrence. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending January 5, 1916. 

Mary P. Barenbaum, President; Bessie Fleet, Secretary; Etta 
Davis, Treasurer. 

Financial aid to the poor and needy of the Jewish race. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $397 28 

Ball and fair , . . . 305 20 

Total current receipts . . $702 48 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 196 00 



$898 48 



Cr. 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Rent . 
Charity 
Accident cases 
Relief fund 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$20 00 
30 00 

360 00 
48 73 
50 00 
38-40 



$547 13 
351 35 

$898 48 



GERMAN RUTH SOCIETY OF LAWRENCE, MASS., 374 Harvard St., 
Lawrence. (Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 31, 1916. 

Mrs. M. Koehler, President; C. Julius Emmert, Secretary; 
Gustave A. Hoepfner, Treasurer; Mrs. Marie Fellbaum, Matron. 

Home for destitute men and women. Admission fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 

Number aided during year, 14, viz., 11 paying, 2 partly pay- 
ing, 1 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,201 40 

Subscriptions and donations . 516 54 

Annuities and bequests to income 300 00 

Income from investments . . Ill 86 

From lawn party . . . 525 58 

Bakery sale . . . . 54 95 

Sewing circle . . . . 64 05 

Miscellaneous . . . . 85 55 

Total current receipts . . $2,859 93 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,003 71 



$4,863 64 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Telephone 

Funeral expenses 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$300 00 

23 75 

711 58 
338 88 

156 94 

23 33 

110 00 

152 93 



$1,817 41 
3,046 23 



$4,863 64 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,000; value of investments, $1,000. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



209 



INCORPORATED PROTECTORY OF MARY IMMACULATE, 189 Maple 
St., Lawrence. (Incorporated 1875.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Sister Catherine 
Blanchfield, Secretary; Sister A. Paradis, Treasurer and Super- 
intendent. 

Care of orphan boys and girls, without distinction of color, 
creed or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 34. 

Number aided during year, 305, viz., 175 paying, 70 partly 
paying, 60 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $12,256 20 

Subscriptions and donations . 929 03 

Annuities and bequests to income 5,043 70 

Patriots' tea proceeds . . 2,627 77 

Miscellaneous . . . . 77 55 



Total current receipts . . $20,934 25 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year . . . . . 4,024 06 



$24,958 31 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $2,329 20 


Printing, postage and office sup 




plies .... 


182 92 


Provisions and supplies 


. 9,607 80 


Heat, light and power 


. 1,543 77 


Furnishings and incidental re 


r 


pairs .... 


1,254 30 


Extra repairs . 


1,569 50 


Miscellaneous . 


600 45 


Total current expenses . 


. $17,087 94 


Cash on hand . 


. 7,870 37 




$24,958 31 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $125,800. 



LADIES' UNION CHARITABLE SOCIETY (LAWRENCE GENERAL 
HOSPITAL), Garden and Prospect Sts., Lawrence. (Incorporated 
1903.) 

Report for year ending August 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Lillian Bridges Rowell, President; Miss Miriam N. 
Flanders, Secretary; Miss Clara F. Prescott, Treasurer; Miss 
Mary E. Barr, Superintendent. 

General hospital work, also district nursing. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 96 (including 54 pupil 
nurses). 

Number aided during year: in institution, 2,149, viz., 1,435 
paying, 91 partly paying, 623 (including 249 babies) free; out- 
side institution, 651, viz., 353 paying, 298 free. 



210 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $48,828 34 

Subscriptions and donations . 13,159 13 

Income from investments . 12,303 00 

From entertainments . . 2,168 15 

Miscellaneous . . . 2,388 32 

Total current receipts . . $78,846 94 
Bequests and gifts specifically 

restricted .... 9,600 00 

Sale of securities . . . 4,040 00 

Mortgage loans ' . •-.'■• 460 00 

Loans to income . . . 4,159 64 
Withdrawn from savings bank 

for reinvestment . . . 561 40 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,522 95 



$101,190 93 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


$20,350 46 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies . 


935 33 


Provisions and supplies . 


18,074 64 


Ambulance 


524 00 


Heat, light and power 


6,948 96 


Furnishings . 


3,606 80 


Medical and surgical supplies 


7,479 54 


Insurance 


1,774 55 


Services of nurses . 


280 00 


Repairs and alterations . 


6,192 67 


Annuities 


560 00 


Taxes .... 


1,476 13 


Interest 


3,002 33 


Miscellaneous 


1,719 20 


Total current expenses ' 


$72,924 61 


Invested 


17,286 64 


Efficiency experts . 


235 72 


Loans to income 


6,260 00 


Land and buildings 


141 44 


Cash on hand 


4,342 52 




$101,190 93 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $250,883.19; value of investments, $183,345.62. 

LAWRENCE BOYS' CLUB, 125 Methuen St., Lawrence. (Incorporated 

1910.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

William T. Dole, President; Richard A. Hale, Secretary; E. B. 
Choate, Treasurer; Joseph F. Wilson, Superintendent. 

Promoting good citizenship and morality; providing a vaca- 
tion center, physical instruction and manual training. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number of members, 1,700. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,319 25 

Income from investments . . 254 25 

From building fund ... 385 00 

Total current receipts . . $1,958 50 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 5 08 



$1,963 58 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Rent 

Heat and light . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,128 51 

384 00 

77 47 

182 04 


$1,772 02 
191 56 


$1,963 58 



Value of investments, $5,450. 



LAWRENCE CITY MISSION, 31 Jackson St., Lawrence. (Incorporated 

1876.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Walter E. Parker, President; Rev. Clark Carter, Secretary; 
Charles H. Littlefield, Treasurer. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



211 



To relieve distress; to prevent unwise giving; to encourage in- 
dependence; to protect children; and to study social problems. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 6. 
Number aided during year, 3,281; families aided, 798. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries (returned) 
Subscriptions aDd donations 
Income from investments . 
Board of children 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$264 91 

8,477 74 

85 00 

3,610 12 

$12,437 77 

28 64 



$12,466 41 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Interest and insurance 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re 
pairs .... 

Board of children 

Transportation 

Telegraph and telephone . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$5,107 91 

241 48 

2,192 15 

348 78 

184 39 

45 89 

3,682 40 

153 57 

86 26 

10 00 

$12,052 83 
413 58 

$12,466 41 



Value of Teal estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$8,500; amount of mortgage on same, $7,500; value of invest- 
ments, $2,000. 



LAWRENCE HOME FOR AGED PEOPLE, Berkeley St., Lawrence. (In- 
corporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending November 8, 1916. 

Newton P. Frye, President; Mrs. Inez M. Lewis, Secretary; 
C. O. Andrews, Treasurer; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph D. Furbush, 
Master and Matron. 

To provide a home for the aged of Lawrence, Methuen and 
North Andover. Admission fee, $250. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5. 

Number aided during year, 29. 



Dr. , 
From beneficiaries 
'Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
Admission fees 
Contributed by inmates . 
May breakfast 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$3,900 00 


201 00 


6,785 20 


1,750 00 


9,595 41 


1,945 23 


271 33 


$24,448 17 


381 25 


$24,829 42 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Medicine, nurse and undertaker 
Heat, light, power and provisions 
Furnishings, incidental repairs 
and miscellaneous expense 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,041 13 
1,127 72 
3,771 04 

1,053 32 

$7,993 21 

15,245 41 

1,590 80 



$24,829 42 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $159,000; value of investments, $134,182.52. 



212 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Lee. 

ASCENSION FARM SCHOOL, CORPORATION OP THE, Tyringham 
Rd., South Lee. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

Giraud Foster, President; Samuel Frothingham, 1 Secretary; 
Adele Kneeland, 1 Treasurer; T. Lee Roberts, Superintendent. 

The training and education of boys from the diocese of western 
Massachusetts. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 18. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 

Farm earnings and sale of willow 

Donation day . 

Rent of cottage 

Telephone refund 

Boarding student 

Interest . 



$4,555 50 

1,451 71 

46 30 

25 00 

6 52 

61 40 

5 22 



Total current receipts . . $6,151 65 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,309 85 



$8,461 50 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions and supplies 
Boys' expenses . 
Heat .... 

Furnishings and improvements 
Laundry .... 
Telephone 
Insurance 
Repairs 

Doctor . . 

Interest on mortgage . 
Farm expenses . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,079 38 

51 32 

1,661 13 

230 88 

198 76 

353 01 

363 88 

50 99 

86 30 

253 75 

31 05 

127 50 

1,404 26 

$6,892 21 
1,569 29 

$8,461 50 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $12,000. 

Leicester. 

LEICESTER SAMARITAN ASSOCIATION, Main St., Leicester. (In- 
corporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending February 13, 1916. 

Miss Elizabeth G. May, President; Miss Margaret H. Sloane, 
Secretary; Miss Catherine Olney, Treasurer. 

Lending to the sick or injured articles to contribute to their 
comfort; also employing a nurse to minister to the needy suffer- 
ing. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 



1 Mrs. Brown Caldwell, present secretary; Henry McBurney, present treasurer. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



213 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $560 00 

Subscriptions and donations . 1,095 85 

Income from investments . . 40 40 

Total current receipts . . $1,696 25 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 599 55 



$2,295 80 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $770 00 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 26 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 26 97 

Rent 2 00 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . . . 7 40 

Total current expenses . . $832 37 

Income invested . . . 500 00 

Cash on hand .... 963 43 

$2,295 80 



Value of investments, $1,572. 



Leominster. 

LEOMINSTER HOME FOR OLD LADIES, 16 Pearl St., Leominster. 

(Incorporated 1891.) 

Report for year ending January 18, 1916. 

Henry R. Smith, President; Mrs. Lillian J. Bigelow, Secretary; 
William A. Putnam, Treasurer; Miss Laura Diersch, Matron. 

Home for elderly ladies; must have resided in Leominster for 
ten years and be over sixty-five years of age. Admission fee, 
$200. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number aided during year, 7. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Rents ..... 


$290 00 

1,287 45 

3,433 72 

294 92 


Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs . . . 
Funeral expenses 
Medical attendance . 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . 


$1,062 00 
965 92 
448 29 

577 98 

76 00 

110 53 

287 41 


Total current receipts . 
Mortgage loan paid '. 
Cash on hand at beginning of 


$5,306 09 
900 00 

11,531 27 




$3,528 13 
14,209 23 




$17,737 36 


$17,737 36 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,714.67; value of investments, $80,185.92. 



LEOMINSTER HOSPITAL ASSOCIATION, 11 Blossom St., Leominster. 

(Incorporated 1902.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Charles F. Nixon, President; P. H. Killelea, Secretary; Robert 
B. Young, Treasurer; Margaret M. Rollins, Superintendent. 
Treatment of medical, surgical and obstetrical cases. 



214 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 312, viz., 221 paying, 52 partly 
paying, 39 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



$7,816 18 
1,581 85 
1,375 86 


$10,773 89 
129 80 


$10,903 69 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages . 


. $3,659 82 


Printing, postage and office sup- 


plies . . 


122 78 


Provisions and supplies 


2,258 84 


Rent 


277 52 


Heat, light and power 


938 63 


Medical supplies 


1,082 12 


Laundry 


836 83 


Interest^and taxes 


150 00 


Miscellaneous . 


538 54 


Total current expenses . 


. $9,865 08 


Cash on hand . 


1,038 61 




$10,903 69 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $10,000; amount of mortgage on same, $3,000; value of 
investments, $34,183.89. 



Lincoln. 

THE FARRINGTON MEMORIAL, INCORPORATED, Lincoln. (In- 
corporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending February 29, 1916. 

Henry M. Rogers, President; Horace Morison, Clerk; Walter 
H. Sweet, Treasurer; Miss Louise Mecuen, Superintendent. 

Temporary care of delicate children, — at present, girls from 
nine to fifteen years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 16. 

Number aided during year, 281, all free. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Income from investments . 


. $14,039 20 


Salaries and wages . 


$5,985 62 


Income from farm sales 


1,302 14 


Provisions and supplies 


1,540 78 






Heat, light and power 


870 53 






Total current receipts 


. $15,341 34 


Furnishings and incidental re 




Loans to income 


1,034 24 


pairs .... 


1,197 34 






Household expenses . 


858 22 






Medical attendance . 


490 95 






Farm expense . 


4,355 91 






Insurance 


122 00 






Miscellaneous . 


954 23 




$16,375 58 


$16,375 58 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $88,416.01; value of investments, $181,620. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



215 



LONGMEADOW. 

CHAPELL MEMORIAL REST HOME CORPORATION, 23 Fernleaf Ave., 
Longmeadow. (Incorporated 1911.) 

Report for year ending December 11, 1915. 

George G. Makepeace, President; Mrs. Cornelia E. Blake, 
Secretary; Rev. Walter Rice, Treasurer; C. E. Blake, Super- 
intendent. 

Temporary or permanent -rest home for Christian workers. 

Number aided during year, 13, viz., 7 paying, 6 partly paying. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $460 51 

Subscriptions and donations . 50 00 

From C. E. Blake . . .149 50 

Total current receipts . . $660 01 

Loans to income . . . . 41 48 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 10 56 



$712 05 



Cr. 



Printing, postage and office supplies 


$8 16 


Provisions and supplies 


371 37 


Water ..... 


20 46 


Heat, light and power . 


125 69 


Furnishings and incidental repairs 


11 05 


Loan paid ..... 


32 72 


Interest ..... 


115 00 


Ice ...... 


10 17 


Removing garbage and ashes 


7 75 


Carfares ..... 


7 90 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand 



$710 27 
1 78 

$712 05 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate pur- 
poses, $6,000; amount of mortgage on same, $4,300. 



THE DOANE ORPHANAGE, 17 Longmeadow St., Longmeadow. (In- 
corporated 1900.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

Charles B. Holton, President; Marcus H. Smith, Secretary; 
Robert F. Ehni, Treasurer; Miss Minnie C. Atwater, Superin- 
tendent. 

To provide a home for children whose parents are unable to 
care for them properly and to promote their education and 
development (girls and boys). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 7. 

Number aided during year, 42, viz., 13 partly paying, 29 free. 



216 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,446 25 

Subscriptions and donations . 4,569 61 

Annuities and bequests to income 400 00 

Income from investments . . 590 75 

Sale of discarded material . . 3 68 



Total current receipts . . $7,010 29 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 546 67 



$7,556 96 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $3,078 64 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 33 36 

Provisions and supplies . . 1,882 01 
Heat, light and power . . 551 98 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 164 53 

Superintendent's current expenses 426 25 

Interest 70 00 

Water supply .... 93 18 

Telephones . . . . 74 41 

Miscellaneous .... 504 59 

Total current expenses . . $6,878 95 

Cash on hand .... 678 01 

$7,556 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$17,000; value of investments, $6,427.78. 



St., Lowell. (Incorporated 



Lowell. 

AYER HOME, TRUSTEES OF, Pawtucket 

1898.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Moses G. Parker, M.D., President; Charles F. Young, Clerk 
and Treasurer. 

To care for unfortunate children (boys and girls). 
Number of paid officers or employees, 15. 
Number aided during year, 175, all partly paying. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Annuities and bequests to income 
Income from investments . 
Fire loss 

Total current receipts . 
Loans to income 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year ..... 



Cr. 



$1,439 96 


Salaries and wages . 


$3,939 06 


3,130 61 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




13,019 54 


plies .... 


205 67 


98 32 


Provisions and supplies 


5,573 56 




. Hospital and toilet articles 


243 83 




$17,688 43 


Heat, light and power 


947 53 


16,708 94 


Furnishings and incidental re- 






pairs .... 


176 36 


8,796 00 


Clothing and shoes . 


668 44 




Laundry . 


469 02 




Hardware, etc. 


199 95 




Swings, seesaws and repairs 


782 79 




Miscellaneous . 
Total current expenses . 


42 50 




$13,248 71 




Income invested . . 


5,240 99 




Cash on hand .... 


24,703 67 


$43,193 37 


$43,193 37 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$25,200; value of investments, $291,000. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



217 



THE BATTLES HOME, 15 Belmont St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1901.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Albert D. Carter, President; Walter H. Howe, Secretary; 
William T. Sheppard, Treasurer. 

Home for aged men, residents of Lowell. Admission fee, $200. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 2. 
Number aided during year,. 6. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,729 15 

Income from investments . . 53 00 

Miscellaneous .... 13 15 

Total current receipts . . $1 ,795 30 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 61 74 



$1,857 04 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Water rates 

Ice 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$611 00 
558 68 
120 03 

69 56 
11 35 
36 81 
46 37 

$1,453 80 
403 24 

$1,857 04 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
>,000; value of investments, $8,250. 



CHANNING FRATERNITY, Lowell. (Incorporated 1884.) 
Report for year ending October 5, 1916. 

Frederic A. Fisher, President; Mrs. Arthur F. Mansur, Secre- 
tary; Albert S. Guild, 26 Arlington St., Lowell, Treasurer. 

Flower mission; country week; culture; missionary work; 
benevolence; hospitality. 

Number aided during year, 82. 



Dr. 



Cr. 



Annual dues 
Culture committee 
Interest .... 


$38 00 

4 75 

790 12 


Printing, postage and office 

plies . . . 
Culture committee 
Missions committee . 
Flower mission . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 


sup- 

. $5 10 
57 50 
75 00 
10 00 


Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 


. $832 87 
year 5,447 89 


. $147 60 
. 6,133 16 




$6,280 76 


$6,280 76 



Value of investments, $6,114.42. 



218 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



FAITH HOME, 249 Westford St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1884.) 

Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

Rev. Asa Reed Dilts, President; Miss Mary E. Drew, Secre- 
tary; Mrs. Georgiana Foss, Treasurer and Matron. 

To provide a Christian home for orphan, neglected and desti- 
tute children (girls and boys). 

Number of paid employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 14, viz., 6 partly paying, 8 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $222 25 

Subscriptions and donations . 856 14 

Income from investments . . 20 20 

Miscellaneous .... 144 00 

Total current receipts . . $1,242 59 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 3 83 



$1,246 42 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$78 00 

5 00 

1,033 63 

72 00 

56 04 

. $1,244 67 
1 75 

$1,246 42 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,000; value of investments, $500. 

FLORENCE CRITTENTON RESCUE LEAGUE OP LOWELL, 91 Parker 
St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1913.) 

Report for year ending March 1, 1916. 

Mrs. Frederick A. Flather, President; Mrs. Burnham R. 
Benner, Secretary; C. Alice Rowell, Treasurer; Miss Edith 
Waterman, Matron. 

To assist unfortunate or needy women of Lowell and vicinity 
by every practicable means. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year: in institution, 25, all free; outside 
institution, 130, all free. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From sales .... 

Membership fees 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$1,045 32 


62 


53 


150 


00 


126 


00 


$1,383 85 


26 


10 


$1,409 95 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


. $414 50 


Provisions and supplies 


438 04 


Rent .... 


120 00 


Heat, light and power 


74 87 


Telephone 


30 13 


Field workers' expenses 


245 08 


Laundry .... 


8 45 


Incidental labor 


24 76 


Total current expenses 


. $1,355 83 


Cash on hand . 


54 12 




$1,409 95 



Value of investments, $1,748. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



219 



THE LADIES' HELPING HAND SOCIETY, 63 Howard St., Lowell. (In- 
corporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending June 30, 1916. 

Jennie Neyman, President; Morris Greenbaum, Secretary; 
Bessie Rosefeld, Treasurer. 

Relief of the sick and general charitable purposes. 
Employs a collector on commission. 
Number aided during year, 39. 



Dr. 

From dues $202 50 

. 270 00 
11 50 



From entertainments . 
Income from investments 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$484 00 
400 00 



$884 00 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$20 00 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


12 50 


Rent for part of year . 


8 00 


Relief to sick .... 


240 00 


One-half interest in real estate, 63 




Howard Street, Lowell, subject 




to mortgages .... 


250 00 


Total current expenses 


$530 50 


Income invested .... 


328 50 


Cash on hand .... 


25 00 



$884 00 



Value of real estate partially owned and occupied for corporate 
purposes, $3,300; mortgage on same, $2,800. 



LOWELL BOYS' CLUB ASSOCIATION, 225 Dutton St., Lowell. (In- 
corporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

William S. Southworth, President; W. A. Mitchell, Secretary 
and Treasurer; James H. Stewart, Superintendent. 
, Nonsectarian work among street boys; maintains club rooms, 
gymnasium, etc. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 5 to 6. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Rent of store 
Refund on fuel . 
Interest . . . . 



$3,399 25 

300 00 

11 80 

1 00 



Total current receipts . . $3,712 05 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 397 81 



$4,109 86 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $2,223 20 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 267 66 

Interest 450 00 

Heat and light .... 302 32 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 184 56 

Water and taxes . . . 192 38 

Insurance . . . . 25 96 

Amusements . . . . 88 60 

Miscellaneous . . . . 65 96 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$3,800 64 
309 22 

$4,109 86 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$20,000; mortgage on same, $10,000. 



220 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



LOWELL CORPORATION HOSPITAL, corner Pawtucket and Merrimack 
Sts., Lowell. (Incorporated 1912.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Frank A. Bowen, President; J. C. Wadleigh, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Dr. E. J. Clark, Superintendent. 

Care of employees of corporations contributing to its support 
(nine manufacturing companies). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 48 (including 21 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,812; number 
of free patients, 10; total number of hospital days during year, 
22,652; number of free days, 195; total number of visits in 
out-patient department during year, 18,668. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $16,581 18 

Payments by city, town or State 330 57 

Voluntary contributions . . 18,100 00 

Miscellaneous .... 1,683 12 



Total hospital receipts . 
Medicines sold at dispensary 

Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning 
year . . 



of 



$36,694 87 
405 62 

$37,100 49 

1,399 30 



$38,499 79 



Cr. 

Administration 

Professional care of patieDts 

Department expenses 

Expenses 

Supplies .... 

Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses 
Dispensary expenses 

Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,940 00 
4,568 82 
4,635 89 
1,802 82 

19,136 97 
3,489 69 

$36,574 19 
1,075 05 

$37,649 24 
850 55 

$38,499 79 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$36,600. 



LOWELL DAY NURSERY ASSOCIATION, 64-66 Kirk St. and 57 First 
St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1899.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Moses G. Parker, M.D., President; Mrs. Charles M. Williams, 
Secretary; J. Gilbert Hill, Esq., Treasurer; Mrs. Amanda J. 
Nelson and Miss Flora E. Brawn, Matrons. 

Care by day of young children of working mothers, and 
temporary home at Kirk Street for children who may need its 
care. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 265; total attendance, 19,789. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



221 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $1,813 65 

Subscriptions and donations . 727 00 

Income from investments . . 2,935 34 

Miscellaneous . . . . 134 86 

Total current receipts . . $5,610 85 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,188 40 



$7,799 25 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages , . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs 
Telephone 
Dry goods 
Medicines 
Miscellaneous 

Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$2,197 91 

1,623 02 

417 50 

83 79 
66 46 

62 87 

27 77 

227 58 

$4,706 90 

461 08 

2,631 27 



$7,799 25 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$11,500; value of investments, $65,876.25. 



LOWELL DISPENSARY, 18 Shattuck St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1836.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Charles H. Hobson, President; Edward B. Carney, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 

To furnish medicines and other needful articles to the sick 
poor of this city (does not maintain dispensary). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 



Dr. 
Income from investments 
Miscellaneous 



$144 00 
139 55 



$283 55 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 
Miscellaneous .... 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand .... 



$13 12 

60 
125 83 

$139 55 
144 00 

$283 55 



Value of investments, $4,341.15. 



LOWELL GENERAL HOSPITAL, Varnum Ave., Lowell. (Incorporated 

1891.) 

Repqrt for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Arthur G. Pollard, President; William T. Sheppard, Clerk; 
John F. Sawyer, Treasurer; Miss Harriet E. Holden, Super- 
intendent. 

The treatment of persons who may need medical and surgical 
attendance during temporary sickness or injury. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 51 (including 25 pupil 
nurses). 



222 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,383; number 
of free patients, 147; total number of hospital days during year, 
20,442; number of free days, 4,128. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . 
Voluntary contributions . 
Interest, ' dividends and rentals 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



$21,858 05 

6,025 42 

16,840 21 

338 54 


$45,062 22 
2,618 73 


$47,680 95 



Cr. 

Expenses of operation 
Special and permanent repairs 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital expenses . 
Cash on hand . 



$40,446 99 

4,884 51 

268 39 

$45,599 89 
2,081 06 



$47,680 95 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$117,450; value of investments, $357,206.21. 



LOWELL GUILD OF LOWELL, 17 Dutton St., Lowell. (Incorporated 

1911.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. James G. Hill, President; Miss Mary G. Lamson, Secre- 
tary; Edward B. Carney, Treasurer; Miss Clara E. Holland, 
Superintendent. 

District nursing and milk station work. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 8. 

Number aided during year, 1,005, viz., 705 paying, 179 partly 
paying, 121 free; number of families aided, 79. 



Metropolitan 

Company 
Regular patients 
Milk station . 
Dues 
Other income . 



Dr. 
Life Insurance 



$2,436 00 

1,340 17 

559 13 

322 02 

4,138 24 



$8,795 56 



Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 3,451 06 



$12,246 62 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies . . . . 

Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re 

pairs .... 
Laundry 

Carfares .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand . . 



$5,316 23 

277 00 

1,060 19 

72 75 

59 98 

12 91 

393 85 

143 01 



$7,335 92 
4,910 70 

$12,246 62 



THE LOWELL HUMANE SOCIETY, 238 Central St., Lowell. (Incor- 
porated 1889.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Robert F. Marden, President; Mrs. Frank E. Dunbar, Secre- 
tary; Edward E. Sawyer, Treasurer; Charles F. Richardson, 
Agent. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



223 



Humane work, especially for children and animals. 
Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $236 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,500 00 

Income from investments . . 1,182 77 

Miscellaneous . . . . 63 00 

Total current receipts . . $3,981 77 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 2,217 22 



$6,198 99 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,801 50 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 20 93 

Rent 360 00 

Heat, light and power . . 52 76 

Telephone . . . . 91 80 

Lowell Day Nursery . . . 91 14 

Electric cat cage . . . 150 00 

Miscellaneous .... 244 27 

Total current expenses . . $3,812 40 

Cash on hand . . . . 2,386 59 



$6,198 99 



Value of investments, $27,521.55. 



MINISTRY-AT-LARGE IN LOWELL, MASS., 150 Middlesex St., Lowell. 

(Incorporated 1879.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Dudley L. Page, President; Henry H. Harris, Secretary; Har- 
vey B. Greene, Treasurer; Rev. George C. Wright, Superin- 
tendent. 

Charity, education, benevolence and religion. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 1. 

Number aided during year, 2,359; number of families aided, 
472. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $459 38 

Income from investments . . 4,225 34 

Total current receipts . . $4,684 72 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 39 31 



$4,724 03 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs .... 
Charity .... 



Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,347 00 
110 00 

17 00 
3,194 80 



$4,668 80 
55 23 

$4,724 03 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$10,000; value of investments, $62,524.80. 



OLD LADIES' HOME, 520 Fletcher St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1867.) 

Report for year ending October 11, 1916. 

Mrs. Caroline A. Richardson, President; Mrs. Edwin T. Shaw, 
Secretary; James E. Gibson, Treasurer; Miss Martha E. Mills, 
Matron. 



224 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



Home for single Protestant women, at least sixty-five years of 
age, residents of Lowell for five years. Admission, $200, and 
conveyance of property to home. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 10. 

Number aided during year, 40. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 

Subscriptions and donations 

Bequests 

Income from investments . 

Miscellaneous . 

Total current receipts . 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year ..... 



$858 00 
2,091 50 
3,565 11 
5,360 24 
200 00 

. $12,074 85 

242 71 



$12,317 56 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . . . $2,783 43 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies ..... 15 00 

Provisions and supplies . . 3,779 51 

Heat, light and power . . 1,851 65 

Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs 301 68 

Total current expenses . . $8,731 27 

Cash on hand .... 3,586 29 

$12,317 56 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$50,000; value of investments, $112,936.52. 



L'ORPHELINAT FRANCO-AMERICAIN, corner Pawtucket and School 
Sts., Lowell. (Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending October 1, 1916. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; J. H. Guillet, 
Secretary; Rev. J. A. Bolduc, O. M. I., Treasurer; Rev. Sister 
St. Honore, Superior. 

The care of poor orphans, motherless or fatherless boys and 
girls, from three to twelve years of age. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 36. 

Number aided during year, 281, viz., 157 paying, 98 partly 
paying, 26 free. 



Dr. 
Subscriptions and donations 
Board of inmates 
Rentals .... 



Total current receipts 



. $4,810 82 

. 18,015 05 

489 00 

.' $23,314 87 



Cash on hand at beginning of 
year 



871 09 



$24,185 96 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 

Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies .... 

Provisions and supplies 

Heat, light and power 

Furnishings and incidental r< 
pairs .... 

Interest .... 

Taxes, water and telephone 

Reduction of debt 

Miscellaneous . 



Total current 
Cash on hand . 



$2,934 65 

328 11 
8,547 98 
2,667 97 

2,628 71 
1,750 00 
644 61 
1,900 00 
1,100 25 



$22,502 28 
1,683 68 

$24,185 96 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$145,000; amount of mortgage on same, $35,000. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. . 225 



ROMAN CATHOLIC ARCHBISHOP OF BOSTON (ST. PETER'S ORPHAN 
ASYLUM), Stevens St., Lowell. (Incorporated 1897.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rt. Rev. Mgr. William O'Brien, President; Rev. Charles J. 
Galligan, Secretary and Treasurer; Sister M. Francis, Super- 
intendent. 

Home for orphan and indigent children (boys and girls). 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 202, viz., 63 paying, 110 partly 
paying, 29 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries . . . $230 98 

Subscriptions and donations . 7,222 59 



Total current receipts . . $7,453 57 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 26 17 



$7,479 74 



Cr. 
Salaries and wages . . . $1,676 00 
Printing, postage and office sup- 
plies 32 75 

Provisions and supplies . . 4,445 14 

Heat, light and power . . 1,023 45 

Miscellaneous . 280 70 



Total current expenses . . $7,458 04 

Cash on hand .... 21 70 



$7,479 74 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$75,000. 



ST. JOHN'S HOSPITAL, Bartlett and Fayette Sts., Lowell. (Incorporated 

1867.) 

Report for year ending November 30, 1916. 

Sister Mary Clare, President, Treasurer and Superintendent; 
Sister Scholastica, Secretary. 

General hospital for the sick and injured, irrespective of creed, 
color, age, nationality or residence. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 56 (including 24 pupil 
nurses). 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 1,527; number 
of free patients, 187; total number of hospital days during year, 
17,127; number of free days, 1,387; total number of visits in 
out-patient department during year, 5,645. 



226 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. 



[P. D. 17. 



Dr. 
Patients' paj-menta . 
Payments by city, town or State 
Voluntary contributions 
Miscellaneous . 

Total hospital receipts . 
Dispensary receipts . 

Total receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of 
year .... 



S26.74S 24 

2,864 00 

3,783 30 

6 76 


$33,402 
1,383 


30 
28 


534,785 

1,379 


58 
53 


$36,165 


11 



Cr. 

Professional care of patients . $2,845 15 
Department expenses . . 3,373 61 
General house and property ex- 
penses .... 23,275 80 
Miscellaneous . . . . 95 70 



Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$29,590 26 
6,574 85 



$36,165 11 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
SS0.000; amount of mortgage on same, 88,000. 

ST. PATRICK'S HOME OF LOWELL, Cross St., Lowell. (Incorporated 

1896.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

His Eminence Cardinal O'Connell, President; Thomas J. 
Enright, Secretary; Rt. Rev. William O'Brien, Treasurer; Sister 
M. Euphrasia, Superintendent. 

Home for young girls and old ladies, without distinction of 
creed, color or nationality. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 14. 

Number aided during year, 281, viz., 156 paying, 29 partly 
paying, 96 free; families aided, 3. 



Dr. 
From beneficiaries . . . $10,657 36 

Dividend on deposit in Traders' 

National Bank . . . 404 00 



Total current receipts . . $11,061 36 

Cash on hand at beginning of 

year 1,703 50 



$12,764 86 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Provisions and supplies 
Heat, light and power 
Furnishings and incidental re- 
pairs ..... 
Miscellaneous . . .. 

Total current expenses . 
Cash on hand .... 



$1,687 00 
5,952 37 
1,320 72 

669 75 
500 72 

$10,130 56 
2,634 30 

$12,764 86 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
850,500. 



Ludlow 

LUDLOW HOSPITAL SOCIETY 



Chestnut PL, Ludlow. 
1914.) 



(Incorporated 



Report for year ending April 30, 1916. 

George A. Birnie, President; William G. Davis, Secretary and 
Treasurer; Miss Louise W. Bolt, Matron. 
Hospital treatment for acute diseases. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



227 



Number of paid officers or employees, 9. 

Total number of hospital patients during year, 221; total 
number of hospital days during year, 3,310; total number of 
visits in out-patient department during year, 2,073. 



Dr. 

Patients' payments . . . $3,348 20 

Payments by city, town or State 173 55 

Voluntary contributions . . 1,200 00 

Interest, dividends and rentals . 10 06 

Membership fees . . . 75 00 

Carnival 911 53 

Insurance company for care of 

accident cases . . . 480 00 

Miscellaneous . . . . 329 75 

Total receipts . . . $6,528 09 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 520 65 



$7,048 74 



Cr. 
Professional care of patients 
Department expenses 
New equipment 

Total expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$2,695 52 

3,767 81 

127 25 

$6,590 58 

458 16 



$7,048 74 



Lynn. 

AID SOCIETY OP THE LYNN DAY NURSERY, 67 Blossom St., Lynn. 
(Incorporated 1909.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Mrs. George P. Faunce, President; Mrs. Lawrence E. Brown, 
Secretary; Miss Harriet B. Harmon, Treasurer; Miss Lucie 
Gillette, Head Worker. 

The care of children under school age whose parents need 
such assistance, and such other social work as may develop there- 
from. Nursery closed and nursery children cared for in families. 

Number of paid employees, 4 (including 2 part time). 

Number aided during year, 124, viz., 3 paying, 5 partly paying, 
116 free. 



Dr. 

From beneficiaries 
Subscriptions and donations 
Income from investments . 
From May breakfast . 
From Christmas account 
Insurance adjustment 

Total current receipts 
Cash on hand at beginning of year 



$240 78 

2,114 47 

132 33 

280 95 

4 00 

2 55 


$2,775 08 
173 05 


$2,948 13 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages 

Printing, postage and office sup 

plies 
Provisions and supplies 
Rent 
Light 

Care of children 
Telephone 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Cash on hand . 



$1,808 39 


40 79 


476 57 


289 00 


19 32 


226 88 


29 54 


39 69 


$2,930 18 


17 95 


$2,948 13 



Value of investments, $5,415.98. 



228 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17. 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES OF LYNN, Room 216, Security Trust Build- 
ing, Lynn. (Incorporated 1894.) 

Report for year ending December 31, 1915. 

Rev. Frederic W. Perkins, President; Mrs. C. C. Sheldon, 
Clerk; Frank E. Bruce, Treasurer; Miss Helen Osgood, General 
Secretary. 

To promote charitable co-operation, secure knowledge of the 
condition and needs of the applicants for relief, procure employ- 
ment or assistance, prevent begging and spread of pauperism, 
maintain stamp-saving society and employment bureau. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 4. 

Number of families aided, 1,164. 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $8,530 53 

Income from investments . . 490 00 

Total current receipts . . $9,020 53 

Loans ...... 1,250 00 



Cash, on hand at beginning of 
year 



106 90 



$10,377 43 



Cr. 

Salaries and wages . 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies . ' . 

Relief .... 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses . 
Income invested 
Loans .... 
Cash on hand . 



$3,111 48 

896 24 

4,858 45 

23 57 



$8,889 74 
198 00 
793 06 
496 63 

$10,377 43 



Value of investments, $10,221.39. 



BOYS' CLUB OF LYNN, 169 Liberty St., Lynn. (Incorporated 1904.) 

Report for year ending September 30, 1916. 

George R. Beardsell, President; Mrs. Charles A. Collins, 
Secretary; William R-. C. Stephenson, Treasurer; Mr. and Mrs. 
E. N. Northrop, Superintendent and Matron. 

To promote among boys and young men in Lynn and vicinity 
temperance, morality and right living, by the establishment and 
maintenance of places for reading rooms, libraries, social meetings 
and otherwise. 

Number of paid officers or employees, 11. 

Number aided during year, 891. 



Part II.] CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS. 



229 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $1,128 98 

Annuities and bequests to income 2,000 00 

Income from investments . . 1,026 95 

Charity ball .... 2,688 49 

Miscellaneous . . . . 35 00 



Total current receipts . . $6,879 42 

Loans to income . . . 327 95 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 4 10 



$7,211 47 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 


$2,467 66 


Printing, postage and office sup- 




plies ..... 


153 40 


Provisions and supplies 


220 18 


Heat, light and power 


315 71 


Furnishings and incidental re- 




pairs ..... 


309 86 


Miscellaneous . 


172 62 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand 



$3,639 43 

3,531 92 

40 12 

$7,211 47 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$7,500; value of investments, $22,545. 



COLUMBUS GUILD OF LYNN, 90 Market St., Lynn. (Incorporated 

1912.) 

Report for year ending May 31, 1916. 

Mrs. Catharine E. Hines, President; Mrs. Mary E. Baker, 
Secretary; Miss Catharine B. Sheehan, Treasurer. 

Relief of destitute Catholic families. 

Number aided during year, 500; number of families aided, 
100. 



Dr. 

Membership fees and guest tickets $480 00 

Donations to building fund . 57 25 

Entertainments, ball, etc. . . 1,170 79 

Cake sale, whist parties . . 280 45 

Donations to relief work . . 113 25 

Interest 10 28 

Total current receipts . . $2,112 02 

Bequest to building fund . . 100 00 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 148 55 



$2,360 57 



Cr. 
Printing, postage and office sup 

plies .... 
Provisions, groceries and supplies 
Shoes and rubbers 
Clothing . 
Fuel 

Children's board 
Miscellaneous . 

Total current expenses 
Building fund 
Cash on hand . 



$50 45 
299 50 
187 77 
98 95 
43 86 
22 00 
73 23 



$775 76 

1,257 10 

327 71 

$2,360 57 



Value of investments, $10,006.95. 



ELIZA J. HAHN HOME FOR AGED COUPLES, 159 Washington St., 
Lynn. (Incorporated 1895.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

Frederic S. Pevear, President; William S. Burrill, Secretary; 
Frank E. Falkins, Treasurer; Florence M. Robertson, Matron. 
Home for aged couples. 
Number of paid employees, 2. 
Number aided during year, 12. 



230 



STATE BOARD OF CHARITY. [P. D. 17 



Dr. 

Subscriptions and donations . $30 00 

Annuities and bequests to income 59 83 

Income from investments . . 5,221 52 

Admission fees .... 508 00 

Insurance . . . . 9 00 

Total current receipts . . $5,828 35 

Cash on hand at beginning of year 1,779 40 



$7,607 75 



Cr. 



Salaries and wages 






$1,013 60 


Printing, postage 


and office 


sup- 




plies 






2 25 


Provisions and supplies 




1,540 64 


Rent 






808 26 


Furnishings and 


incidental 


re- 




pairs 






646 30 


Taxes 






660 96 


Water 






41 00 


Insurance 






112 16 


Legal expense 






11 05 


Miscellaneous . 






333 79 



Total current expenses 
Income invested 
Cash on hand . 



$5,170 01 

1,500 15 

937 59 

$7,607 75 



Value of real estate owned and occupied for corporate purposes, 
$13,620; value of investments, $68,876.82. 



LYNN HOME FOR AGED MEN, corner Forest and Grove Sts., Lynn. 

(Incorporated 1890.) 

Report for year ending March 31, 1916. 

James P. Martin, President; William S. Burrill, Secretary; 
Eugene B. Fraser, Treasurer; Mrs. M. L. Philbrook, Matron. 

Home for men in needy circumstances, not less than sixty-five 
years of age, residents of